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Billy:
Anyone ever heard of "Powder Welding"? This uses a nickel powder, and a special oxy-acetlylene torch, and seems ideal for effecting low temperature repairs on cast iron. Heard of the process from a friend of mine who worked for many years in a railway engeering workshop, where they used the process for rebuilding worn train wheels.

Bill

rcavictim:
The modern large commercial wind turbines that have towers made from thick rolled steel sheets are powder welded.

dkwflight:
Hi You guys are talking about different things. The oxy torch powder is in short a special torch that moves the buildup powder through the torch flame which is used to keep a melt puddle going on the surface that needs build up or a hard surface.
There is a version thauses a plasma torch to generate the heat. This is a better method for applying materials to a surface because a greater heat is used resulting in better fusion of the applied metal to the surface.
The welding method used on large assemblys is a wire welder moved by a trolly at a uniform speed to get uniform results. The flux is applied by a funnel to keep a pile around the weld puddle. one of the advantages is the flash is hidden in the pile of flux.
Dennis

rcavictim:

--- Quote from: dkwflight on August 20, 2006, 06:25:49 PM ---
The welding method used on large assemblys is a wire welder moved by a trolly at a uniform speed to get uniform results. The flux is applied by a funnel to keep a pile around the weld puddle. one of the advantages is the flash is hidden in the pile of flux.
Dennis

--- End quote ---

A company with access to some serious coin put up forty five, 1.5 MW wind turbines close to me last summer and I inspected one of them close up in person while it was still laying on the ground.  I was guessing the wall thickness was maybe 1-1/4 to 1-1/2 inches thick steel plate rolled in a tapering cylinder and the joint welds were absolutely perfect seams maybe 7/8 inch wide and slightly convex beyond the surface of the joined plate.  The company website had a description of the manufacturing process and it told that the towers were rolled and powder welded.  I think it would take me a year to weld one of those seams with my own equipment and I`d have to mortgage my home to pay for the energy and all the stick electrode.  The resultant weld would look like crap and would have more flux entrapped within it than Carters has pills.  :(

Billy:
The method I have been told about is termed "Micro fusion welding" and apparently is very suitable for repair of cast iron parts, and is done with an oxy actylene type torch.

Bill

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