Author Topic: CS 6/1 repair?  (Read 19088 times)

Procrustes

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 332
    • View Profile
Re: CS 6/1 repair?
« Reply #30 on: August 21, 2006, 07:37:46 AM »
That email address is linked to a business, and is commonly used by any of the 4 people connected to the business in regard to posting on the net, membership of various forums etc.

One of your three co-workers might be Chris Stevens but you're not sure, evidently not having made the acquaintance of all three of the others.  Moreover you and your co-workers find it convenient to share an email address for social purposes, rather than registering four addresses.  Your lies are so lifeless that I half wonder if you don't wish to be called out.

FYI "Guy Fawkes" or John Bunt I am told is a workshy single man from Exeter in the UK, who last year alleged that being trolled on an obscure Usenet forum, had resulted in his becoming impotent;  in response to which he took legal action against 3 ISP's and 3 individuals, which  as you can probably guess from the content of his posts on here ended in abject failure, and unpaid legal bills of $71,617!

Personally though I have little interest in ridiculous idiots like Mr Bunt, but had posted here solely looking for help with my engine which as soon as I have repaired the cylinder and got it looking good, is something I want to take around UK shows and rallies along with my small collection of classic motorcycles.

Yours is one of the lowest reputations I've encountered on the internet.  Repugnant is your name.  Again, I have to wonder if you don't wallow in this, because you sound smarter than your lies.

rpg52

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 387
    • View Profile
Re: CS 6/1 repair?
« Reply #31 on: August 21, 2006, 11:57:38 PM »
Billy,

Initially you had questions about repairing your cracked Lister CS


     "Just found this forum, and wonder if anyone can advise if its possible to repair a cracked cylinder block on Lister CS 6/1? Been told by an engineer I know that it may be possible to braze this, but wonder if there is any other way to do it as I have no access to brazing equipment."


Then, it seems you really already know all there is to know about repairing cast iron.


     "Apparently the "repair" carried out by Guy Fawkes, may well have been 100% sucessful if it had been in a low stress situation, ideally under compression loading. However the fact that its not, and bearing in mind the area of welded material between the cast iron and mild steel MIG weld is going to be glass hard Martensite, then its almost certain that the repair is going to fail pretty quickly.

     The proper way to effect a repair such as this would be with braze, or ideally powder welding. A friend of mine who is now an engineer in the UK nuclear industry, has provided me with this information, and to tell you the truth after having a quick read through some of the stuff on Guy Fawkes web site, it seems to me he doesnt really know what he is talking about."


So, my question(s) for you, (since you really don't seem particularly interested in answers anyway) is, when can we see a photo of your original Lister, with its' cracked head?  What year was it made?  How long have you owned it?  What are your plans for it?  Is it a SOM or a standard 6/1?  What foundation is it on? Run it on diesel or WVO?  Are you real or are you wasting everyones' time because you have a bone to pick with a fellow countryman who happens to post here?  A real Lister owner would love to tell us all about the engine(s) that are the subject of this Forum.  All that other stuff, I for one can do without.  Thanks,
Ray
PS Listeroid 6/1, 5 kW ST, Detroit Diesel 3-71, Belsaw sawmill, 12 kW ST head, '71 GMC 3/4 T, '79 GMC 1T, '59 IH T-340

bbbuddy

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
Re: CS 6/1 repair?
« Reply #32 on: August 24, 2006, 06:10:35 PM »
Billy,

Initially you had questions about repairing your cracked Lister CS
==========

   So, my question(s) for you, (since you really don't seem particularly interested in answers anyway) is, when can we see a photo of your original Lister, with its' cracked head?  What year was it made?  How long have you owned it?  What are your plans for it?  Is it a SOM or a standard 6/1?  What foundation is it on? Run it on diesel or WVO?  Are you real or are you wasting everyones' time because you have a bone to pick with a fellow countryman who happens to post here?  A real Lister owner would love to tell us all about the engine(s) that are the subject of this Forum.  All that other stuff, I for one can do without.  Thanks,
Ray

Way to go Ray!   :D

t19

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1424
  • Tanks and Lister... Heavy Metal
    • View Profile
Re: CS 6/1 repair?
« Reply #33 on: August 25, 2006, 12:12:53 AM »
Ray, don't confuse the man with reality.
There is plenty of room for all of Gods creatures... right next to the mashed potatoes...

billrok

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
    • View Profile
Re: CS 6/1 repair?
« Reply #34 on: August 25, 2006, 12:33:25 AM »
Your block can be repaired.  It doesn't matter where the crack is.  Check out: http://www.andersonofrosholt.com/4436.html Their work is incredible.  I think I'll just have my Listeroid dropped shipped directly to him and have him completely go thru it before I even take it home.  Then for sure I'll have an engine to last at least my lifetime.  No worries on a cracked block.   :D

listerdiesel

  • Guest
Re: CS 6/1 repair?
« Reply #35 on: September 16, 2006, 05:42:10 PM »
Just found this forum, and wonder if anyone can advise if its possible to repair a cracked cylinder block on Lister CS 6/1? Been told by an engineer I know that it may be possible to braze this, but wonder if there is any other way to do it as I have no access to brazing equipment.

TIA

Bill

As most CS original blocks frost crack in the same place, there are a number of options open to you.

1) Push/tap the crack together and try and flatten the area generally back to what it should be, then get it welded professionally bu someone with a pre-heat furnace and the correct rods.

2) Cut out the cracked area and drill/tap holes in the surrounding metal  to take a plate, if you are lucky enough, one of the side cover plates often fits over the area nicely, or you can make a larger plate up which can be made to look 'original'. The shell of the block is not very thick, so smaller threads are better in some respects.

3) Use one of the proprietary filler materials to fill the crack.

Peter

t19

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1424
  • Tanks and Lister... Heavy Metal
    • View Profile
Re: CS 6/1 repair?
« Reply #36 on: September 17, 2006, 03:11:55 AM »
First off though, always use anifreeze, even if you don't live in the Great White North!!
There is plenty of room for all of Gods creatures... right next to the mashed potatoes...

listerdiesel

  • Guest
Re: CS 6/1 repair?
« Reply #37 on: September 22, 2006, 05:14:47 AM »
First off though, always use anifreeze, even if you don't live in the Great White North!!

It's worth using antifreeze all the time as it has rust inhibitor in it, very useful if you want to leave water in the engine at all times. Using plain water will encourage rusting at the air/water interface and accelerate decay inside the block and head.

Peter