Author Topic: Dismantling Lister D Governor mechanism  (Read 218 times)

ajcooper4

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Dismantling Lister D Governor mechanism
« on: May 14, 2021, 01:51:38 PM »
Could someone help this newbie please?

I have now decided to dismantle the governor mechanism to enable me to better clean and paint around the bottom of the cylinder block on my Lister D.

I have a couple of exploded diagrams but they're hazy to say the least.  Does anyone have any diagrams or, even better, advice on how to do this please?

ajcooper4

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Update!
« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2021, 05:27:46 PM »
I decided to persevere one split pin and nut and bolt at a time!

End result I have removed the linkage and the governor cover.  In my view it looks fine and once cleaned up and a fresh gasket applied I feel it's fine to leave this alone and dismantle no further.  Any advice would be most welcome.




scott p

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Re: Dismantling Lister D Governor mechanism
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2021, 03:23:28 AM »
I have no experience with that type of engine but I would be suspicious of those governor springs. Being mismatched like that doesn't seem right. Look at your exploded diagrams

cobbadog

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Re: Dismantling Lister D Governor mechanism
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2021, 06:36:28 AM »
I have no experience in this governor either but it is similar to others I have played with. Always the most important thing to do is to take a pic at every stage of dismantling this makes it easy to assemble. Hopefully you have not moved the adjustment of the linkage set up as it would have been close to being correct.
I would be a bit suspicious of the mismatched spring too but it just might run as they are. Not sure what part of the planet you are in but I would find a local parts supplier or a pair of new springs similar to what you have and fit them. Often I find replacement springs at the local hardware here, I measure the overall length and the thickness of the spring and count the coils too. Springs are cheap to buy so consider replacing them.
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ajcooper4

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Re: Dismantling Lister D Governor mechanism
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2021, 02:08:34 PM »
I thought a little update might be interesting to members - and I have a question also!

First, apparently, having done some research and talked to much older people who have worked on the Lister D the governor springs are actually supposed to be different sizes.  One spring controls the idling speed and the other the maximum.  Anyway, the weights move out freely so all seems well internally.

Second thing is my question.  Part of my restoration is to give my 'D' a reasonable paint job.  To do this I really need to remove the governor assembly but wonder if it will come off independent of the housing which the magneto sits on.  I can't see why not but I am reluctant to start pulling away if this isn't possible.  I can't find much on line to give a clear answer.

Many thanks in anticipation of any support or guidance that can be offered.

cobbadog

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Re: Dismantling Lister D Governor mechanism
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2021, 06:42:01 AM »
Not completely sure what your asking about the governor but if it is about stripping the governor assembly for painting then yes it can be done just take lots of pics and as a part comes off lay it down in order so you have a record as to how and what order it goes back together.
Never knew that about the springs either. It is good to learn new things each day but my problem is remembering them.
What do you plan to do as far as the painting?  Bare metal then depending on the paint an under coat/ primer then top coat/s. Remember that there are parts of the engine that get hot bloody hot like an exhaust manifold and some heads so a suitable paint should be chosen. I have sprayed a few different toys from tractors, mowers and stationary engines. I have used colours suitably matched to original colour from engine enamels to using 2pac paint. With the 2pack I did use an primer that was the same brand paint as the the 2pac. I have learnt over the years to pic the paint and buy it as a system undercoat/primer then top coat even their thinners if required. By doing this you will have far less chances of a problem. I have read a few times that people used a primer/undercoat of one brand and a different brand top coat and had all sorts of issues from rejection to crinkling.
Engine enamel did a great job on the engine of the David Brown Cropmaster tractor and then used 2pac on the rest of the tractor. Not one person has picked up on the slight colour difference. I used engine enamel on an air cooled mower and it is fine on the barrel but a failure on the head as it got too hot for the rating on the paint. There are extreme high temp engine enamels but I have not used them and a brother in law bought a can of that extreme high temp stuff to spray his headers on a V8 restoration but the car is not assembled as yet so not tested that result.
Like so many things, preparation is the key to a good finish as well as weather. We get a lot of humidity during mid to late Spring and onto Summer so don't spray in those conditions as humidity bubbles will appear in a while down the track.
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ajcooper4

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Re: Dismantling Lister D Governor mechanism
« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2021, 02:35:31 PM »
I wondered if forum members may like an update?  Governor now repainted - I like hand painting as I don't want it to look like a new engine - and repositioned on the engine.  Not keen on the card gaskets provided by Stationary Engine Parts - thin and don't fit well.

Picture attached - during some thread 'chasing'!

cobbadog

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Re: Dismantling Lister D Governor mechanism
« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2021, 07:01:42 AM »
Its looking good, and yes members always like to see any progress as they happen if if they are problems in progress. You are doing your restorastion exactly the way you want it to look and good on you for doing so.
Keep us informed as you go.
Withy gaskets I always take note of the thickness of what came off and I buy gasket paper in metre square sheets and cut my own.
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