Puppeteer

Author Topic: gasket for the 6/1 - which side up?  (Read 1130 times)

tyssniffen

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 126
    • View Profile
Re: gasket for the 6/1 - which side up?
« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2020, 04:50:15 PM »
Quote

There's no good reason not to use a little gasket sealant around the waterways, just make sure you go the right side of the bolts...

Of course, if one had a 12/2, one could do the experiment by installing the gaskets opposite ways up on each cylinder, and trying it out. Should anyone wish to ship me a 12/2, I will sacrifice the time to do the experiment, in the interests of science, obviously :)


the next time I have a 12/2 all boxed up and no where to go, I'll send it your way.   

Are you saying - giving me permission - to use extra make-a-gasket sort of material around the holes, IN ADDITION to the copper spray stuff on the copper gasket?
6/1 with 2 tank for WVO.  pushing power into off-grid house battery bank, in winter.

glort

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3392
    • View Profile
Re: gasket for the 6/1 - which side up?
« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2020, 08:54:27 PM »

The problem with gasket sealer is... people.  They use way too much and block water and oil passages.
All one needs is a very thin smear. You are trying to block tiny little irregularities,  not 1" holes. 
I was using some yesterday and I also let the stuff Cook off a good bit before mating the surfaces. This lets it harden up a bit instead of just oozing everywhere. I also put the surfaces together and wait some more before tightening them down.

I would use 1 or the other, Probably the copper spray.
I would definitely NOT use both.

Hugh Conway

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 424
    • View Profile
Re: gasket for the 6/1 - which side up?
« Reply #17 on: February 28, 2020, 09:17:54 PM »
Re: the "sandwich" gaskets........thin copper, a paper filler, another thin copper, as the Indian listeroid gaskets.
Back in the earlier days of this forum, it was suggested to soak the gasket in a liquid floor wax with silicone. the paper like material soaks up the silicone, making it waterproof. Otherwise coolant eventually wicks through the paper. Let the gasket dry out dry before installing.
Works for me. I have used the composite gaskets too. They seemed to work great on my Dursley, but the somewhat different listeroid head does not give good results. In fact, GasketNation recommended their Lister head gaskets be used only on original Listers, or clones that are copies of the original head bold pattern.
Cheers
Hugh
JKson 6/1  (Utterpower PMG ) Off-grid
Lister 6/1 Start-O-Matic engine......running with PMG
1978 Royal Enfield (glutton for punishment by Indian iron)
1963 BMW R-27 project

AdeV

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 584
    • View Profile
Re: gasket for the 6/1 - which side up?
« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2020, 11:24:46 PM »

the next time I have a 12/2 all boxed up and no where to go, I'll send it your way.   


Works for me!


Are you saying - giving me permission - to use extra make-a-gasket sort of material around the holes, IN ADDITION to the copper spray stuff on the copper gasket?


Like Glort says, use a thin smear of the stuff. Also, only use something like blue Hylomar - don't use a silicone based sealant. That gasket is going to see some heat, the silicone will break down at high temperatures.

I don't know anything about the copper spray, so again will defer to Glort's advice on that.

The purpose of the sealant is to block up any capillaries which might allow water to seep out once the gasket is tightened up. Dead smooth block and head faces would mean you didn't need it, but a little smear won't hurt. A 1/4" bead will do more harm than good.
Cheers!
Ade.
--------------
1x Lister CS Start-o-Matic (complete, runs)
0x Lister JP4 :( - Sold to go in a canal boat.

glort

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3392
    • View Profile
Re: gasket for the 6/1 - which side up?
« Reply #19 on: February 29, 2020, 11:51:22 AM »

I don't know anything about the copper spray, so again will defer to Glort's advice on that.

Copper based products seem to work well.  The copper spray does work very well at sealing head gaskets and other things. I also know of a head gasket and radiator sealant that is copper based and it's the only one every mechanic I know thinks actualy works.  It's $70 a Bottle here but as much as I don't believe in Miracles in a Bottle, this stuff does work. More as fix for leaking head gaskets than holed radiators but it works very well on anything seeping like where the core and the header tanks are coming apart or weeping hoses that don't seem to be able to be clamped tight enough.


Quote
Dead smooth block and head faces would mean you didn't need it, but a little smear won't hurt. A 1/4" bead will do more harm than good.

Years ago I used to hot up a lot of 2 stroke engines.  The particular engines I worked on had a fair lip on the head I used to shave down about 8mm which improved compression dramatically being a perfect hemi type head.  I used to do the initial material removal by rubbing the aluminium head on some rough concrete in the workshop but then progressed to rough cutting with an angle grinder ( I did say rough!  :0) ) and then face them  down on a bit of chipboard with some wet and dry glued to it.

As ridiculous as it sounds, I could, with the care I took, get those heads so flat they did not need a gasket at all. The way they were running  the head stud stretch could be a problem as could over heating and softening the head.  I lifted a head a few times and replaced them with another and having no gaskets with me, I ran them like that with no issues.  In the end gave up on the gaskets and used a hole punch to create the head stud holes in photo paper which was heavier than normal writing paper but nothing like cardboard and would just poke a hole in the centre where the bore was.

Once the engine started up the paper was soon burned out and the gasket worked perfect.  Would have never believed I could get a surface so flat myself with such a crude method till I did it so many times.  The crank cases  were 2 part and all they ever got was a smear of PVC pipe sealant and never had any trouble with them either not that they were holding back Cylinder pressure.

I never had any problems with head sealing ( Cylinder was steel so never gave any problems or wharped) other than through pushing the engines to about 6X the power outputs they made in stock form and raising compression to levels the things should just not have worked at. .