Author Topic: Can anyone identify this?  (Read 470 times)

Johndoh

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Can anyone identify this?
« on: November 23, 2019, 03:24:55 PM »
I bought this old consaw it wont start, good spark and good compression I think it needs a carburettor. It's supposed to be a Husqvarna. Hoping one of you guys can identify it. thanks

photos are on dropbox link below

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/ah6v5if3fogof0y/AACBWqOOPlwlBbgf3lA7kMbka?dl=0
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Willw

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Re: Can anyone identify this?
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2019, 05:01:39 PM »
Looks like a Dolmar 309 or similar

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8k4Df3wYjGA
Daily driver '97 GMC W4 tipper on WVO/Kerosene mix.
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Johndoh

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Re: Can anyone identify this?
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2019, 05:08:44 PM »
Looks like a Dolmar 309 or similar

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8k4Df3wYjGA

Fast response and on the money, thank you very much!
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Willw

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Re: Can anyone identify this?
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2019, 05:15:52 PM »
Possibly a Dolmar 343, I am not familiar with these so do your comparisons.
https://www.propertyroom.com/l/dolmar-343-cut-off-saw/10940613
Daily driver '97 GMC W4 tipper on WVO/Kerosene mix.
6/1 clone standby generator.
Too many projects.

Willw

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Re: Can anyone identify this?
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2019, 05:30:19 PM »
Apparently the 309 and 343 might use the same carb, but check that the one you have is the same brand and part number as the kit.
Often times we get away with only changing the rubber metering diaphragm and adjusting the mixture screws; for which you possibly need a special tool.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/RK-27HS-CARBURETOR-REPAIR-KIT-DOLMAR-116-120-133-143-309-343-TILLOTSON-CARB-DR94/262211578884?hash=item3d0d072c04:g:Xr8AAOSw3KFWgBdS
Daily driver '97 GMC W4 tipper on WVO/Kerosene mix.
6/1 clone standby generator.
Too many projects.

Johndoh

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Re: Can anyone identify this?
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2019, 05:37:26 PM »
I had a quick look at the price of a carburettor it's double what I paid for the saw for a genuine part. I could replace the rubber parts it is cheap enough, thnks for the link. I dont know if its a good brand or run of the mill?
It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness

mikenash

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Re: Can anyone identify this?
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2019, 06:27:15 PM »
People like to play with the carb adjustments when the saw won't run or won't rev cleanly or won't rev properly - it seldom turns out well - often you inherit a saw that has been so tinkered-with that it won't run even with good spark & compression

Based on my experience, here are some thoughts

(1)  Empty all the old gas out of the tank, put in a wee bit of new clean gas and shake it around to give it a flush then tip that out too

(2) Get a bit of bent wire and fish out the fuel filter and blow it clean with compressed air then fill the tank with fresh 2-stroke mix - maybe 25:1 or 32:1 with that old saw?  If it should be 40:1 a bit extra won't hurt short-term.  Use good quality 2-stroke oil such as Husqvarna or Motul - something that is designed for chainsaws not lawnmowers and that says "suitable for 2% or 50:1 mix" on the label

(3) Remove the aircleaner (it'll need a good clean before it goes back on), open the choke and tip half a teaspoon of gas down the carb.  Close the choke, turn it on and pull a few times.  It should splutter, start, run briefly and then stall.  Try it a couple times.  If that doesn't work, probably tinkering with the carb won't fix it

If that does work, then . . .

(4)  Carb settings:  There will be two screws probably side-by-side on one side of the carb.  High speed mixture and low speed mixture.  Also somewhere there'll be an idle speed device - probably as a throttle stop?  With a bit of luck on the plastic housing there will be two screwdriver holes marked maybe "H" and "L" (high and low) or similar?  It'll be obvious that you need a small flat-bladed screwdriver

Blow the whole area clean with compressed air and screw both screws in gently until they stop.  Then screw them out again one and a quarter turns (probably one and an eighth is gonna be closer to ideal but one and a quarter will get you started)

At those settings the saw should start and run and rev (but probably not rev very cleanly) and it might idle of the throttle stop is OK

If that stuff works OK you should google "chainsaw carb tuning" or similar to get it just right

The aircleaner needs to be spot on clean and in good shape too

Good luck

Willw

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Re: Can anyone identify this?
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2019, 08:47:51 PM »


Dolmar, a German company, has been around since 1927 and owned by Makita since 1991. Dolmar chain saws are comparable to Stihl, another well-rated and very popular German brand.

I recently repaired a Dolmar PS5100 chain saw and the engine certainly ran well when I was finished with it. When he came to collect it, I told the owner that it is my new favorite chainsaw.
A very easy-starting and clean-revving saw.

If I was you I would also pull off the muffler and have a look at the piston and cylinder for damage. Check the exhaust port and spark arrestor screen for carbon build-up while you have the muffler off as well. Also look at the piston through the exhaust port; there could be undetected scarring despite you saying it has good compression.
You don't want to start spending only to later realize the engine is on it's way out.
Daily driver '97 GMC W4 tipper on WVO/Kerosene mix.
6/1 clone standby generator.
Too many projects.

Johndoh

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Re: Can anyone identify this?
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2019, 08:53:15 PM »
Well guys I tried the clean fuel etc the day I got it, nothing except a wet plug when fuel was dripped into the carburettor. On a clean plug with no fuel into the carburettor it stayed bone dry. Thanks for the info on it Will always good to learn a little bit. I'm not going to spend any money on it with the air filter where it is, someone will want it! It can be their trouble after that I think it's old and tired but it was something to play with for a while.
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cobbadog

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Re: Can anyone identify this?
« Reply #9 on: December 10, 2019, 03:49:47 AM »
The good advise that mikenash gave is spot on. Only minor difference I do is to wind the mixture screws out 1 1/2 turns. If you have had no joy something that I have found with engines with high speed carbies is that no one runs them dry when finished with. This ends up gumming up the insides of the carby and in particular the filter and tiny galleries inside. Without a rebuild kit you might be able to fix it by soaking the carby base and not the diaphrams in paint thinners for a couple of days then get out the air blower from the compressor and blow it clean. Be careful when you are near the gauze filter as to not blow it out or if you do don't bend it and make sure you can catch it when pr if it flies out.
I have done many of these engines on whipper snippers, blowers and saws and only had one not come back to life and run properly. and because I knew how good and little use it had had in its life I did buy a new carby but it was not that expensive, around AU$30.00. Now, with my high speed engines I use them then empty the fuel tank and re start it and run it dry and have had no problems ever doing this.
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