Author Topic: Centrifuges Really Work  (Read 288 times)

snowman18

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Centrifuges Really Work
« on: November 09, 2019, 03:23:37 AM »
This was a small experimental centrifuge that I made to recover precious metals from computer chips, when I started this project knew absolutely nothing of how they worked.

I've used a DC motor with a speed controller the bowl is made from a solid piece of polypropylene which is mounted direct onto the motors shaft.

You can see the gold in the concentrates last image.

My next centrifuge will be used to clean waste cooking oil, I'll be using a spindle from a discarded lawn mower deck but these are cheap enough to purchase new

The tan colored material in the first bowel picture is the precious metals, then when these were extracted copper showed up.












saba

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Re: Centrifuges Really Work
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2019, 12:29:36 PM »
Interesting to follow,

Once I had ideas about trying to use a clothes dryer/spinner. They are out of fashion and you can pick them up for cheap. Should give some G's and they should keep the mess in the enclosure.

regards bernhard

glort

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Re: Centrifuges Really Work
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2019, 02:56:49 PM »

The one thing I don't favour with fuges for cleaning oil is they don't dry it.  While many people don't bother drying oil, having run vehicles and engines on it 17 Years this month, I believe it is absolutely essential for trouble free use of veg oil.  Unlike Diesel, Veg is Hygroscopic and dissolved water cannot be settled or spun out.  To dry the oil requires a separate operation that makes settling ( which spinning in a fuge is only accelerated) and then drying just as easy as spinning it up.

I tested my settled and filtered oil in a fuge many years ago. The amount of sediment the fuge got out was basically irrelevant and as the chemist that owned the fuge said, the individual particles were so small they would most likely pass through a filter and certainly a fuel injector so were of no consequence. I use 1 or 5 Um water filters and can put through at least 2500L .  I can put through more but after that much I just change them as a matter of precaution.

Mate and I tried building fuges a couple of times out of an old washing machine and some other bits and pieces and gave up on the idea.  The use of a mower deck spindle is a good one as you need something that is REALLY  strong and something that is very well balanced. If you have built a fuge yourself, that is a credit to you as it's not an easy thing to get right despite how simple they appear. There are a LOT of forces at play in those things.
Our washing machine attempt was going well till it got  a wobble with about 10L of ooil in it and went from spinning smoothly to exploding in every sense of the word in less than a second. I'll bet my mate is still cleaning polermiresed oil off his tools to this day. Also bet that not one single thing that was there in that shed has the slightest hint of corrosion.

I would suggest incorporating a drying mechanism into your fuge design.  I use a bubbling system in a tank that recirculates and can dry and filter 200L of oil in as little as 30 Min.  That's normally in summer, winter may take an hour or 3 depending on if I add heat and the humidity and how long the oil has settled.

Once it comes out the processor I know it's cleaner than pump diesel and every bit as water free.
I would also suggest having your oil dry enough to pass a hot pan test as a minimum before putting it into a fuel tank.

snowman18

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Re: Centrifuges Really Work
« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2019, 06:02:54 PM »
glort high speed centrifuges are capable of separating isotopes from gaseous mixtures, this is how they enrich uranium.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gas_centrifuge

How many G forces was your centrifuge producing, where you running cold oil or did you first heat the oil to improve its viscosity, which would encourage the water to drop out.

The deep fryer operates at temperatures well above the point of evaporating water which is evident when a basket of potatoes chips i first submerged into the hot oil.

The sizzle and bubbling only cease once the top layer of the chip has been cauterized sealing the remaining moisture inside.

Oil is lighter than water, increase the speed of your centrifuge and warm the oil before feeding it into the centrifuge the water has no choice other than to be liberated.

Also have you installed a water separator into your engine fuel system.

Bubbling air through your oil is no guarantee your going to end up drying the oil, air itself has a lot of moisture content.

I have a refrigerated air dryer from a retired dentist similar to the one below. Instead of passing air through the chill plate I'll be passing water used from my still condenser.







« Last Edit: November 09, 2019, 06:11:58 PM by snowman18 »

snowman18

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Re: Centrifuges Really Work
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2019, 12:43:23 AM »
Most modern washing machine motors these days are 3 phase running off an inverter incorporated into an onboard module.

The use of a 3 phase motor eliminates the need for a transmission, the motor receives commands from the inverter module for speed and direction of rotation.

If your neighbor had set a broken washing machine to the curb in all probability it has a faulty inverter, the motor should be salvaged for projects like building a centrifuge.

An inexpensive VFD ( variable frequency drive ) is all that is needed to run that motor and they will spin up to 20,000 rpm. Om the video below Raw Power near the beginning of the video says the bowel is operating at 6,000 rpm.

For a bowel the size of the Raw power centrifuge the manufacture is still within the safe limits. But I would not attempt to pull more G force fro that bowel.

Here's a link to calculate g forces generated re diameter and rpm's applied.
http://www.endmemo.com/bio/grpm.php


VFD powering up a repurposed smart drive motor.
https://youtu.be/yaIUp9ZzjYU

Raw Power Centrifuge
https://youtu.be/yaIUp9ZzjYU
« Last Edit: November 10, 2019, 12:46:54 AM by snowman18 »

glort

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Re: Centrifuges Really Work
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2019, 12:49:14 AM »
glort high speed centrifuges are capable of separating isotopes from gaseous mixtures, this is how they enrich uranium.

Yes, but that's not something you would build yourself or would be able to afford for drying oil.


Quote
How many G forces was your centrifuge producing, where you running cold oil or did you first heat the oil to improve its viscosity, which would encourage the water to drop out.

Our centrifuges produced about z G's before self destructing.   :(  Commercial fuges people have used both the bowl and the jet type do NOT get dissolved water out of oil.  There is a big difference between water droplets and dissolved water.  Dissolved water particles are very small and the molecular weight is too close to water to seperate by non specialised fuges. Not basing this on my experience with them as much as going on other peoples attempts I have been reading for 15 years plus. Some real smart people have taken this on and never had success UNLESS, they invest considerable energy in heating the oil to drive the water off by evaporation.

Quote
The deep fryer operates at temperatures well above the point of evaporating water which is evident when a basket of potatoes chips i first submerged into the hot oil.

Yep, that's what everyone thinks until they they get oil that is wet and learn there are other forces at work. TBH, I forget what they are now, learned and forgot about it a long time ago as it was irrelevant.  The frying process even though it typicaly operates at double the boiling point of water does NOT eliminate all the moisture from the oil.  Yeah, I know it sounds illogical but it's a well known thing in veg circles not something I made up.

Quote
The sizzle and bubbling only cease once the top layer of the chip has been cauterized sealing the remaining moisture inside.

That is not what happens.  The moisture continues to escape through the cells of the food while it is being cooked.  If all the water was eliminated you would have something as dry as a brick.  If the food was sealed, the increasing temperature and steam pressure inside the food would cause it to rupture.

Quote
Oil is lighter than water, increase the speed of your centrifuge and warm the oil before feeding it into the centrifuge the water has no choice other than to be liberated.

Again, this -may- be possible on some specialised industrial Fuge but it's not going to happen on a home made bowl fuge before it explodes.  Again, many smart people around the world have tried it and no one got dry oil that would pass a simple Hot pan test which is the basic standard of dry oil just by spinning alone.

 Not talking about droplets, talking about DISSOLVED water which must be eliminated to prevent a range of problems.

Quote
Also have you installed a water separator into your engine fuel system.
 

Completely and utterly useless against DISSOLVED water.  If one is putting oil wet enough to have drop out in their tank, they are very soon going to be one of these people whom complain Veg does not work and caused them problems when the people who prepare the oil right will do it for years without issue.  The ONLY separator / filter that is effective against dissolved water is the water block type Filters. Forget who makes them now, Racor Maybe? But they are very expensive ( and bulky)  and if you run undried oil through them they will block up fast as is their job.

Quote
Bubbling air through your oil is no guarantee your going to end up drying the oil, air itself has a lot of moisture content.

Maybe no guarantee but if you do it right and check it, definitely works and effective.  Have the vids demonstrating it.  Yes, air does have moisture but unless you are dying on very humid days which a smart person pays attention to and avoids, the humidity in the air is still low enough to dry the dissolved water out of the oil to the required standard.  I have also channelled combustion air from a burner though the processor and that really rips the moisture out.   

Quote
I have a refrigerated air dryer from a retired dentist similar to the one below. Instead of passing air through the chill plate I'll be passing water used from my still condenser.

Refrigeration and vacuum have been  used and are very effective but also very energy intensive. I have seen some setups that pump some serious energy into drying and filtering when it's just no necessary. Comes back to the old thing that many seem to believe that unless something is complicated, expensive, energy intensive and has a lot of built in failure points, it can't possibly work.  If you have the gear and it's not a lot to run, that would work well but again, that's not the fuge alone drying the oil, it's an extra process.

I would strongly suggest you look up what a hot pan test is and when you have spun up your oil, test it and see how much water you have. Unless you are exceptionally lucky, you WILL have water in  any used oil you get. In 17 years I have got oil ONCE that would pass a HPT without drying it.
I would say pretty conservatively I have got over 100K L  in the time I have been playing with veg.

When you get it really dry, you can add 3-4 drops of water to a cup of oil, mix it up and still pass the HTP.

glort

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Re: Centrifuges Really Work
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2019, 01:11:32 AM »

An inexpensive VFD ( variable frequency drive ) is all that is needed to run that motor and they will spin up to 20,000 rpm. Om the video below Raw Power near the beginning of the video says the bowel is operating at 6,000 rpm.

For a bowel the size of the Raw power centrifuge the manufacture is still within the safe limits. But I would not attempt to pull more G force fro that bowel.

I would not attempt or advise anyone to try to spin a Motor let alone a bowl that wasn't xrayed and tested to 20K rpm.  No normal motor would stand that without a good chance of it coming apart like a hand grenade at those speeds.
I'd sure as hell not try anything home made at 6000 Rpm either.  I'm no safety sook but there is a point where self preservation kicks in.
It's not just about the integrity of the bowl itself, if it has a Kg or more of oil and crud sitting in it, that just increases the torsional stresses and strains.

Looking at that fuge site was certainly a trip down memory lane. I remember when those things first came out.
Then just like now, While they do a good job, I can still do the same and in some ways better job with a setup costing $150 rather than the better part  of $2k.

Yes, the fuge will get the oil cleaner, don't deny that BUT, it's cleaned to a point where it doesen't matter.  Onboard filters are Typicaly 10 UM. Some rare ones are 7 UM.  I clean my oil with a 1 or a 5 UM filter.  They cost me $8 and have for years. I change them out to be safe so the pumps I use don't collapse them if they do block after I have put 2500L through them.
If you clean your oil to .5 Um with a fuge, it makes no difference.  It's like filling a bucket from another bucket or a water truck.  Once you have your 10L, the rest is just a waste of time and effort.

Typicaly I change my onboard fuel filters every second oil change which is 6 Months.  Even though I get them used, they are still never blocked at that time but again, I do it as a precaution not that I haven't changed a load of them by the side of the road over the years when I was still learning.
I know a lot of people crap on about them lasting a year or more but I really don't care.  It's illogical to spend $1500 to extend the life of a 10 or even $20 fuel filter which you would never come near getting back. Save the investment on a fuge and put it into fuel filters and water filters for the processor and you'll be miles better off.

The other aspect is you WILL get contamination in the tank anyway no matter how clean it and the oil starts out.  The return oil going through the hot injector pump will polymerise, you will get dust and dirt coming in through breathers, chemical and metal reactions, soft hose degradation going into the fuel and so on.
If you are filtering your oil cleaner than comes out the pump to start with, that's enough.

It's also why making sure the oil IS dry is more important rather than cleaning the oil to a pointless degree.

snowman18

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Re: Centrifuges Really Work
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2019, 02:34:49 AM »
glort high speed centrifuges are capable of separating isotopes from gaseous mixtures, this is how they enrich uranium.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gas_centrifuge

 

Yes, but that's not something you would build yourself or would be able to afford for drying oil.


Quote
How many G forces was your centrifuge producing, where you running cold oil or did you first heat the oil to improve its viscosity, which would encourage the water to drop out.

Our centrifuges produced about z G's before self destructing.   :(  Commercial fuges people have used both the bowl and the jet type do NOT get dissolved water out of oil.  There is a big difference between water droplets and dissolved water.  Dissolved water particles are very small and the molecular weight is too close to water to seperate by non specialised fuges. Not basing this on my experience with them as much as going on other peoples attempts I have been reading for 15 years plus. Some real smart people have taken this on and never had success UNLESS, they invest considerable energy in heating the oil to drive the water off by evaporation.

Quote
The deep fryer operates at temperatures well above the point of evaporating water which is evident when a basket of potatoes chips i first submerged into the hot oil.

Yep, that's what everyone thinks until they they get oil that is wet and learn there are other forces at work. TBH, I forget what they are now, learned and forgot about it a long time ago as it was irrelevant.  The frying process even though it typicaly operates at double the boiling point of water does NOT eliminate all the moisture from the oil.  Yeah, I know it sounds illogical but it's a well known thing in veg circles not something I made up.

Quote
The sizzle and bubbling only cease once the top layer of the chip has been cauterized sealing the remaining moisture inside.

That is not what happens.  The moisture continues to escape through the cells of the food while it is being cooked.  If all the water was eliminated you would have something as dry as a brick.  If the food was sealed, the increasing temperature and steam pressure inside the food would cause it to rupture.

Quote
Oil is lighter than water, increase the speed of your centrifuge and warm the oil before feeding it into the centrifuge the water has no choice other than to be liberated.

Again, this -may- be possible on some specialised industrial Fuge but it's not going to happen on a home made bowl fuge before it explodes.  Again, many smart people around the world have tried it and no one got dry oil that would pass a simple Hot pan test which is the basic standard of dry oil just by spinning alone.

 Not talking about droplets, talking about DISSOLVED water which must be eliminated to prevent a range of problems.

Quote
Also have you installed a water separator into your engine fuel system.
 

Completely and utterly useless against DISSOLVED water.  If one is putting oil wet enough to have drop out in their tank, they are very soon going to be one of these people whom complain Veg does not work and caused them problems when the people who prepare the oil right will do it for years without issue.  The ONLY separator / filter that is effective against dissolved water is the water block type Filters. Forget who makes them now, Racor Maybe? But they are very expensive ( and bulky)  and if you run undried oil through them they will block up fast as is their job.

Quote
Bubbling air through your oil is no guarantee your going to end up drying the oil, air itself has a lot of moisture content.

Maybe no guarantee but if you do it right and check it, definitely works and effective.  Have the vids demonstrating it.  Yes, air does have moisture but unless you are dying on very humid days which a smart person pays attention to and avoids, the humidity in the air is still low enough to dry the dissolved water out of the oil to the required standard.  I have also channelled combustion air from a burner though the processor and that really rips the moisture out.   

Quote
I have a refrigerated air dryer from a retired dentist similar to the one below. Instead of passing air through the chill plate I'll be passing water used from my still condenser.

Refrigeration and vacuum have been  used and are very effective but also very energy intensive. I have seen some setups that pump some serious energy into drying and filtering when it's just no necessary. Comes back to the old thing that many seem to believe that unless something is complicated, expensive, energy intensive and has a lot of built in failure points, it can't possibly work.  If you have the gear and it's not a lot to run, that would work well but again, that's not the fuge alone drying the oil, it's an extra process.

I would strongly suggest you look up what a hot pan test is and when you have spun up your oil, test it and see how much water you have. Unless you are exceptionally lucky, you WILL have water in  any used oil you get. In 17 years I have got oil ONCE that would pass a HPT without drying it.
I would say pretty conservatively I have got over 100K L  in the time I have been playing with veg.

When you get it really dry, you can add 3-4 drops of water to a cup of oil, mix it up and still pass the HTP.

snowman18

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Re: Centrifuges Really Work
« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2019, 04:59:29 AM »
glort I"m doubtful bubbling air through WVO is going to remove the moisture, then on the other hand I agree with you on that the centrifuge will not removed any moisture which has become emulsified into the oil.

A very long time ago I used to collect waste engine oil that I sold to a refinery to use as feed stock, from each tank load I brought in a lab technician would grab a sample.

A measured amount from the sample was heated in a flask with the moisture re-condensed into a graduated column. From this they were able to calculate the percentage of water in my load.

The refinery deducted that percentage of water from the payout.

I have since done a bit of research regarding the ph of waste cooking oil, here is what I have learned.

The pH of neat vegetable oil varied between 7.38 and 8.63 and of WCO between 5.13 and 6.61

The used oil is acidic, water is one of the worlds best solvents.

I'm going to set up an experiment over the next couple of days and I'm hoping that my video camera will catch and show the results.

The experiment using a liter of waste cooking oil placed into a glass beaker, two stainless steel plates submerged into the oil with a small DC current passed through the oil.

What I'm expecting or hoping to see on camera is off gassing ( bubbles ) as the moisture molecules are being turned into its two components hydrogen and oxygen via electrolysis.

If I'm not able to visually see any off gassing, I'll tape a plastic bag over the top of the beaker to catch the gas's - just keep open flames at bay.



snowman18

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Re: Centrifuges Really Work
« Reply #9 on: November 10, 2019, 06:01:06 AM »
glort shortly after plugging in the power supply when a shine a light into the dark colored oil I can see bubbles coming off the electrodes.

The oil is cold and fairly thick hopefully the bag tapped over the top of the gallon jar has a story to tell us in the morning.

I'm using titanium electrodes but stainless steel strips will work just as sell for this purpose. The power supply came from an old ATM but you can use an old PC power supply, some you have to bride a couple of wires to get them to power up.

I'll run this experiment one more time, do a hot plate sizzle test before and after.

In the meantime we wait for the results.



« Last Edit: November 10, 2019, 06:15:26 AM by snowman18 »

snowman18

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Re: Centrifuges Really Work
« Reply #10 on: November 10, 2019, 06:07:11 AM »
From another unrelated experiment that resulted in some neat nickle crystals electroplated onto a stainless steel sheet.




mike90045

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Re: Centrifuges Really Work
« Reply #11 on: November 10, 2019, 06:29:48 AM »
Collecting the gas with a bag & rubber band, you have a perfect explosive mix of H & O2  The tiniest spark and your bag will vanish with a loud BOOM.
 (gas mix also known as Browns Gas, for the mark it leaves in your underwear)

snowman18

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Re: Centrifuges Really Work
« Reply #12 on: November 10, 2019, 07:14:27 AM »
Collecting the gas with a bag & rubber band, you have a perfect explosive mix of H & O2  The tiniest spark and your bag will vanish with a loud BOOM.
 (gas mix also known as Browns Gas, for the mark it leaves in your underwear)

Isn't chemistry great,

The gas is trapped in the oil, it has turned cloudy.



« Last Edit: November 10, 2019, 07:18:34 AM by snowman18 »

glort

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Re: Centrifuges Really Work
« Reply #13 on: November 10, 2019, 09:26:22 AM »

The pH of neat vegetable oil varied between 7.38 and 8.63 and of WCO between 5.13 and 6.61

Pure oil cannot have a PH because only water can.  That is one reason to dry the oil, to remove any acidity or alkalinity.
I have not found new oil to have moisture a Hot pan test can detect so I don't know where this information came from or how it was deduced unless they are talking some microscopic amount of water that would be far below the threshold of any concern for engine fuel use.

I have found a combination of heat and Bubbling work best for drying oil. Sometimes I add heat with a burner, mainly in winter and when it's not so cold I let the heat from the circ pump which gets imparted to the oil do the job. As long as you have the oil warmer than the ambient air the process works quite efficiently.

I am extremely cautious about boiling oil. Again there are principals at work I do not understand but are well aware of their presence.
I have a couple of times seen eruptions in oil that was being heated to dry it and had  one particular near miss that motivated me never to do that again.
I believe what happened was the water coalesced in the bottom of the drum which was being heated over a fire. I also believe the weight on the water from the oil above pressurised the oil slightly but enough to raise it's boiling point. The temps and pressures involved go against my understanding of science but a first hand demonstration of the effect makes that quite irrelevant. When the water went past that boiling point, it flashed to steam  which is about a 1000X expansion and sent a Column of oil straight up.  I would guess about 150L out of that 200L drum was outside the drum at the peak of the eruption and I was within 2 ft of it sitting there watching the fire up till that point, very relaxed. 

Very luckily for me the great majority of the oil which was smoking hot so about 200oC went straight back down into the drum and I got minimally splashed. The bottom of the drum was severely distorted  from the eruption and the frame it was sitting on exerted enough of a thump down into the  concrete it was sitting on for my wife to come up and ask what I had done to make the house shake that was 25M away.  Not an experience I'll ever forget nor wish to repeat except in a clear acre with me a good 30M away.

This was not the first time I had seen this, happened numerous times when drying oil for Bio production with a friend but it certainly was the most powerful and shorts filling example of the action.  I have dried VERY little oil like that since and won't use larger than a 25L Drum with constant stirring.

Boiling oil is a very poor way to dry it efficiency wise but not really a factor when you have loads of crappy oil you don't want to put through the vehicle or a ton of Kindly donated but incorrect to use engine oil.  It's also not something you can set up and walk away from like you can my normal processor.

This is a dodgy Vid I did some time ago on my processor which filters and dries the oil at the same time. Been using this setup a long time now and while I am always keen to find a better mousetrap, especially when someone else has done the hard yards and worked it out but so far, I have not been able to find one that is near as simple or cost effective.

ATM I am building a scaled up version from a 1000L IBC tank for a local company that runs a fleet of trucks and machinery.  I will be putting in an electric heater and thermostat to take the oil to about 40oC  to help drive off the moisture.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQL5ff9ICUs

snowman18

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Re: Centrifuges Really Work
« Reply #14 on: November 10, 2019, 03:56:04 PM »

The pH of neat vegetable oil varied between 7.38 and 8.63 and of WCO between 5.13 and 6.61

Pure oil cannot have a PH because only water can.  That is one reason to dry the oil, to remove any acidity or alkalinity.
I have not found new oil to have moisture a Hot pan test can detect so I don't know where this information came from or how it was deduced unless they are talking some microscopic amount of water that would be far below the threshold of any concern for engine fuel use.

I have found a combination of heat and Bubbling work best for drying oil. Sometimes I add heat with a burner, mainly in winter and when it's not so cold I let the heat from the circ pump which gets imparted to the oil do the job. As long as you have the oil warmer than the ambient air the process works quite efficiently.

I am extremely cautious about boiling oil. Again there are principals at work I do not understand but are well aware of their presence.
I have a couple of times seen eruptions in oil that was being heated to dry it and had  one particular near miss that motivated me never to do that again.
I believe what happened was the water coalesced in the bottom of the drum which was being heated over a fire. I also believe the weight on the water from the oil above pressurised the oil slightly but enough to raise it's boiling point. The temps and pressures involved go against my understanding of science but a first hand demonstration of the effect makes that quite irrelevant. When the water went past that boiling point, it flashed to steam  which is about a 1000X expansion and sent a Column of oil straight up.  I would guess about 150L out of that 200L drum was outside the drum at the peak of the eruption and I was within 2 ft of it sitting there watching the fire up till that point, very relaxed. 

Very luckily for me the great majority of the oil which was smoking hot so about 200oC went straight back down into the drum and I got minimally splashed. The bottom of the drum was severely distorted  from the eruption and the frame it was sitting on exerted enough of a thump down into the  concrete it was sitting on for my wife to come up and ask what I had done to make the house shake that was 25M away.  Not an experience I'll ever forget nor wish to repeat except in a clear acre with me a good 30M away.

This was not the first time I had seen this, happened numerous times when drying oil for Bio production with a friend but it certainly was the most powerful and shorts filling example of the action.  I have dried VERY little oil like that since and won't use larger than a 25L Drum with constant stirring.

Boiling oil is a very poor way to dry it efficiency wise but not really a factor when you have loads of crappy oil you don't want to put through the vehicle or a ton of Kindly donated but incorrect to use engine oil.  It's also not something you can set up and walk away from like you can my normal processor.

This is a dodgy Vid I did some time ago on my processor which filters and dries the oil at the same time. Been using this setup a long time now and while I am always keen to find a better mousetrap, especially when someone else has done the hard yards and worked it out but so far, I have not been able to find one that is near as simple or cost effective.

ATM I am building a scaled up version from a 1000L IBC tank for a local company that runs a fleet of trucks and machinery.  I will be putting in an electric heater and thermostat to take the oil to about 40oC  to help drive off the moisture.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQL5ff9ICUs

glort you disappoint me with this statement,

Pure oil cannot have a PH because only water can

The fact that used cooking oil becomes acidic was all I needed to know that the combination of oil and emulsified moisture would conduct a dc current.

The dc current liberates the emulsified moisture as hydrogen and oxygen which I have this far proven with the used oil used for the experiment having changed to a cloudy mixture.

The oil from the experiment is now infused with gas bubbles of hydrogen and oxygen, the oil is sitting on my shop in sub freezing temperatures outdoors.

The cold oil has trapped the microscopic gas bubbles which is causing the oil to be cloudy.

Hang in there glort we're going to learn something new here.

The information on ph was a quote from this article.

Viscosity Characteristics of Waste Cooking Oil with Ultrasonic Energy Irradiation
https://www.e-sciencecentral.org/articles/SC000015241

« Last Edit: November 10, 2019, 04:22:22 PM by snowman18 »