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Author Topic: What's best to use for mountings?  (Read 439 times)

glort

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What's best to use for mountings?
« on: June 28, 2019, 08:38:48 AM »

I want to make a base to mount my Rt125 Kubota and a 12Kw 3 phase motor to.
The engine is 120 Kg and 12 Hp ( bit smaller than a 1195 from what I can tell) and the motor is a portly 170 Kg.

I'm thinking to do them as a fixed setup because I cant see how I would ever  keep the things from walking them selves through the shed wall and anything else in their way if they were mobile. Might be OK if I got some hubs and put it all on car tyres but tha'ts going to make it big and still dam heavy to move..... If I will ever want to.

I am wondering if I would be better to go to a wooden or steel Mounting?
I have some 3x 3.5" hardwood up the back and I could go to some sleepers if that weren't sufficient. I'm thinking I could secure them with the engines with some L brackets to the garage floor.  The engine and motor would have to be coachbolted to the timber but I'm worried about the longevity of keeping it all tight.  I'm more inclined to go with the the 5x3.5" rectangular Tube I also have. I am concerned about the noise with that but was thinking I could put a strip of rubber between it and the concrete and dynabolt it down easily by bevelling the ends with the plasma Cutter.
the other thing I'm thinking is I could  mount the motor direct to the steel just by bolting it Although the far bolts from the end will be a trick  to get done up and then for the engine I could just weld some Unistrut to the rail and use that to tension the belt.  I have used a car screw Jack before to get the tension then just do the bolts up tight and could also secure  with a bolt through a piece of steel welded to the rail(s).

I had the roid on timber and bolted that to the concrete but I could never keep it tight. The roid is a jackhammer but the Kubota while it will stay put on a rubber mat, it certainly has some good hammering as well. I'm not sure if the considerable inertia of the Motors rotor and when it is at load will smooth things out or make them worse with the power pulses of the single Cyl engine.

Interested in some opinions and experiences and suggestions as what may be the best way to go here with mounting this setup.

ajaffa1

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Re: What's best to use for mountings?
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2019, 12:13:56 AM »
If you have a local sawmill ask them to mill you a couple of 8"x 6" hardwood slabs around four foot long. Lay them side by side with a suitable gap and use the 3 x 3 you have as bracing between them, mount the engine/generator on these. It won`t go anywhere. Some Aussie hardwoods are so heavy they don`t even float!

Bob

BruceM

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Re: What's best to use for mountings?
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2019, 12:33:54 AM »
I think you've got the options well in hand, Glort.  Steel with some rubber isolation or wood, depends on what's available.  My neighbor's propane CS is on a modest wood base, bolted to the slab.  It's a copy of my "temporary" wood base. My base got a new coat of paint a few months ago, still looks great.  Only 2- 4x6's with 2x6 cross planking, all Gorilla glued and screwed. Foot traffic on the base for compressor belt removal/install and oil change service was the cause for new paint. Behr premium plus housepaint is proving to be oil and antifreeze resistant, so far.


glort

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Re: What's best to use for mountings?
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2019, 05:49:16 AM »
If you have a local sawmill ask them to mill you a couple of 8"x 6" hardwood slabs around four foot long.

I was thinking of this very thing Bob.
Cut some timber from Dads place and take it to the mill down the road.  I thought just slabbing it on 2 sides and leaving the raw edge on the others would look good although the bark would probably come off when it Dried and shrank. I was also thinking if I put it together while Green it would Dry and lock up together real tight. Would be a nice keepsake in years to come knowing where it came from.

I did think of the oil changes  Bruce but the Kubota engine has the oil drain on the side of the engine which shows a bit of forethought. I was going to look at extending that with a bit of pipe and a tap which I could attach some hose to and add a bit of pressure through the dipstick hole to blow the oil out.

My idea was to lacquer the wood to preserve the look of the timber but I think this would be a catch 22.  I'd need to lacquer it before it got stained with any oil and would probably have to let it dry first which could take a year.  I'm not much of a wood worker or very knowledgeable with it so was wondering if I could not lacquer the bottom face and it would eventually dry out that way?

Other option would be to Kiln Dry it.  I could put a couple of 44 gallon drums together for an oven and put a burner at low heat under them for a couple of days and watch the temp to dry it that way.

I have pondered Boiling timber in oil as well.  I was wondering if it would dry the timber and the oil would soak in to preserve it.  Also wondered about this for Firewood.  If you boiled the timber a good while and then let it cool in the oil would the timber absorb the oil and increase it's energy when Burned?

BruceM

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Re: What's best to use for mountings?
« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2019, 06:21:36 AM »
An finish on very green lumber will be history as far as I know.  Log oil or white mineral oil (baby oil sans vit E) will hold up out of the weather pretty well.  Latex house paint would work, if it was moderately dry as it breathes moisture and at least the Behr premium plus seems to laugh at oil and radiator fluid. 

Draining oil via gravity is something I don't do any more. Too much mess. I've a topsider fan, of the homebrew variety using an old propane tank and a vac/pressure gauge. I dispense it via pressurizing the tank to a 5 gallon hydraulic oil bucket with small cap in the lid, which I can take to the dump and pour out in their huge collection tank. 




glort

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Re: What's best to use for mountings?
« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2019, 06:35:05 AM »

I take it topsider is Vacing out the oil?
I have read that this does not get all the oil out but even so, I don't see that as a big problem.  Put in some diesel and suck that out as a flush and all good.
Done that a few times On diesel vehicles after letting the sump have a soak and I have seen some decent gunk come out the first times I did it. 
No reason you couldn't put the wash through a fuel filter and blend it in the fuel so it's not wasted.

The air filter recently fell off my compressor and I noticed the intake port is threaded to 3/4. I was going to put a T there with some taps so I can use it to vac tanks out as well as a compressor.

Maybe a steel base with timber inserts for the engine to actually sit on would be the way to go for this engine and do the wood for the Lister.... when I get it.
I'll try to remember to take some pics of the Roid tomorrow so I can advertise that.

BruceM

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Re: What's best to use for mountings?
« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2019, 04:22:43 PM »
I use an old Harbor Freight compressed air venturi to suck a vacuum on my extraction bottle. I use a 1/4" ID air hose to slip on only brass hose barb.  Fast and cheap. A rubber tipped air blow nozzle lets me pressurize for dispensing via the same brass fitting.  The real Topsider has a piston and is hand pumped for vacuum or pressure. They seem to be nice units that people review well, but I'm cheap and had an old 3 gallon propane bottle without the float valve so couldn't be used anymore.

Draining doesn't get all the oil out either, by a long shot, so I don't worry about flushing. In the Listeroid I remove the large door to change the cotton rags in my gravity-bypass filter, (aka "sock in a box") with every oil change, so am able to suck it down to the last drop by the drain plug through the large access door and then usually wipe out the sump as well. For all other equipment, I just suck it down to the bottom of the sump, including my MB 300D.