Author Topic: Engine cooling  (Read 20117 times)

38ac

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Re: Engine cooling
« Reply #15 on: October 17, 2012, 02:54:15 PM »
Anybody care to recommend a thermal switch for the fan?  I sort of am at that stage in my project.

Quinn

About all the cars these days have a temp sensor that could be used the problem is the threads are often something you wont easily find a tap for and they are often set for temps too hot for my liking. I have gotten a couple of them from Jegs since they are right around the corner from the office. If I did the link right they should come up there are several temp ranges.   http://www.jegs.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/KeywordSearchCmd?storeId=10001&catalogId=10002&langId=-1&Ntk=all&Jnar=0&Ne=1%2B2%2B3%2B13%2B1147708&searchTerm=fan+swith

You cant run the fan directly from the sensor, you will need a small relay to handle the amps. 
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TPXX

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Re: Engine cooling
« Reply #16 on: October 17, 2012, 03:13:05 PM »
OK I see the temp control switches but it brings to question, what is the proper operating temp for our engines? I have to get the thermostats for my 12/2 as well as know when to have the fan kick in. I guess the fan should come on at a slightly higher temp than the thermostats themselves.

38ac

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Re: Engine cooling
« Reply #17 on: October 17, 2012, 03:39:27 PM »
I like the ones that cut in at 190. Some say there is gain from running hotter but I am not a fan of running that.
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Quinnf

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Re: Engine cooling
« Reply #18 on: October 17, 2012, 05:38:35 PM »
Just found the motherload of all temperature snap switches on eBay.  Cheap from China with free shipping.  Any temperature you want.  I want to sense temperature at the radiator water inilet, so want some sort of clamp-on, or something I can modify that doesn't require a threaded fitting.  A snap switch is simple, reliable and cheap.  Trying to keep electronics to a minimum.  I went for a 90C switch.

quinn
Ashwamegh 6/1, PowerSolutions 6/1 "Kit" engine, and a Changfa R175a that looks like a Yanmar I once knew

Tom

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Re: Engine cooling
« Reply #19 on: October 17, 2012, 06:59:25 PM »
I used one of these for my coolant pump, will work for a fan too. http://www.senasys.com/shop/products-page/500-inch-radius-pipe-mount/2570f211/

Tom
2004 Ashwamegh 6/1 #217 - ST5 just over 3k hours.

BruceM

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Re: Engine cooling
« Reply #20 on: October 17, 2012, 08:25:01 PM »
That's a gem, Tom.

t19

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Re: Engine cooling
« Reply #21 on: October 17, 2012, 10:51:46 PM »
Sweet looking switch... would work great for my fan
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bandmiller2

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Re: Engine cooling
« Reply #22 on: October 20, 2012, 01:11:34 AM »
Would probibly be good form to have a backup say a 180 degree and a 190 degree,redundency is good on any backup power installation. Frank C.
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ronmar

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Re: Engine cooling
« Reply #23 on: October 20, 2012, 04:14:24 AM »
Yep, and with inexpensive snap switches, redundancy is easy, either two of the same in parallel on the same circuit, or with computer fans, you can have them come on in stages...  Most snap switches are designed for switching AC current. But again with computer fans, you switch the AC feeding small DC supplies powering the fans, and you use the AC already provided by the generator, no need for a separate alternator...

As for runnig temp, diesels like being run hot.  It aids in fuel atomization/more complete combustion and the engine runs more efficiently.   I would reccomend a 190F - 195F thermostat.
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Mucke

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Re: Engine cooling
« Reply #24 on: October 20, 2012, 02:20:26 PM »
hallo all,

I used the air the very flywheel generates ,
Just build a housing around it and lead the air up to the radiator.
Must fit around the shaft on engine sice and leave 20 cm open in the center of the wheel outside.
Plenty air !

Rolf

Ah, by the way :
Anybody has the torque value for the studs of a 12/1 handy?

Thanks

LowGear

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Re: Engine cooling
« Reply #25 on: October 20, 2012, 07:56:16 PM »
Aloha ronmar,

Quote
with computer fans, you can have them come on in stages...  Most snap switches are designed for switching AC current. But again with computer fans, you switch the AC feeding small DC supplies powering the fans, and you use the AC already provided by the generator, no need for a separate alternator...

This world has so many toads and so few frog princes - Thank you.  This is a step up on my near fatal attraction for computer fans.  Hmmmmm, I've got a bunch of those wall socket DC (Watch-Out some be AC) power supplies.  This weekend's Mr. Science project.  9 to 15 volts should be close enough.  Was anyone else thinking speed control?

Casey
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Witte BD Generator
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fabricator

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Re: Engine cooling
« Reply #26 on: October 21, 2012, 01:35:52 AM »
Let's not get all carried away here folks, remember these things in a previous incarnation ran for thousands and thousands of hours with no fan or radiator, I put the 24 volt fan on mine with the radiator mounted outside and it rarely comes on, even in the summer, my radiator is a big four core unit out of a Chevy camper van.
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Quinnf

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Re: Engine cooling
« Reply #27 on: October 22, 2012, 03:44:32 PM »
Depends on the installation.  Some of us used smaller radiators for one reason or another, which require some sort of fan, even if it's just a computer muffin fan.  I have a Geo Metro radiator mounted to two studs on the inside of the groj wall.  Breathing through the stud cavity, I might be able to get it to draw by bending up some sheet metal, but the engine's running a genny anyway, and anytime the engine's running there's beaucoup (a technical term) power to run a muffin fan or three.   

Ashwamegh 6/1, PowerSolutions 6/1 "Kit" engine, and a Changfa R175a that looks like a Yanmar I once knew

Tom

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Re: Engine cooling
« Reply #28 on: October 22, 2012, 06:07:59 PM »
Another thought, the generator has a fan in it that will be turning anyway. Why not mount the generator high and use that airflow ducted through a radiator???
Tom
2004 Ashwamegh 6/1 #217 - ST5 just over 3k hours.

LowGear

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Re: Engine cooling
« Reply #29 on: October 22, 2012, 06:42:57 PM »
Have we discussed the venturi effect air flow systems from the exhaust.  The looked pretty interesting in previous threads.

Casey
NPR Tipper/Dump Truck
Kubota BX 2230
Witte BD Generator
SunnyBoy 6000 + SolarWorld 245