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hwew

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« on: December 13, 2005, 05:23:38 PM »
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« Last Edit: September 27, 2009, 08:37:56 AM by hwew »

rpg52

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Re: SATYAJEET" SLOW SPEED GM-90 SERIES ENGINES.
« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2005, 05:42:17 PM »
I'm certainly no expert, but I understand that these engines run at a higher rpm (= higher wear rate), and contain a number of "non-standard" parts, so replacement parts may only be obtained from the manufacturer.  The aluminum pistons are a particular concern.  Having said that, I've heard that they run well and seem to have fewer quality problems than some others.  Your call, it depends on their use I suppose.
Ray
PS Listeroid 6/1, 5 kW ST, Detroit Diesel 3-71, Belsaw sawmill, 12 kW ST head, '71 GMC 3/4 T, '79 GMC 1T, '59 IH T-340

swedgemon

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Re: SATYAJEET" SLOW SPEED GM-90 SERIES ENGINES.
« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2005, 11:41:25 PM »
hwew,
About a month ago I bought a GM-90 6-1 from Mike Montieth in Rutherfordton, NC.  I am happy with it, although it is now all apart with the block out at the local auto parts place for "cooking and blasting".  When I pulled the two covers off, I found some bentonite grit in the bottom of the case.  When I got it apart there were several pockets of grit in the corners of webs, although they were painted over and would have likely never washed loose.  There was quite a bit of casting scale inside the cylinder cooling passages and the head cooling ports had some globs of bentonite hanging around (easy to knock loose with a small hammer and punch).  A water pump comes with these engines and if you use the pump without cleaning the cooling passages, the grit will eat the brass pump impeller right quickly.
The cam tappets looked good, the fuel rack was not painted over, the valves seat well in the head, there was no cylinder scoring, the engine was packed and crated well and Mike is a good guy...
I made up a gib key puller, based on the puller that Mike showed me...his uses a 1" Acme screw for applying pressure, while mine uses a 4-ton Harbor Freight Port-a-Power...after I get the engine back together I'll take some photos of the puller and post them.  The 4-ton cylinder was not quite strong enough to break the gib key loose, but a quick tap with a long, thin cold chisel between the puller and the flywheel hub got it started and the puller took it the rest of the way with no deformation on the key.
Swedgemon
Somewhere in Kentucky