Author Topic: Another Rescue Engine  (Read 26915 times)

LowGear

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Re: Another Rescue Engine
« Reply #15 on: June 11, 2010, 06:47:52 PM »
rleonard,

Great thread and really good photos.

Thanks
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Re: Another Rescue Engine
« Reply #16 on: June 13, 2010, 04:41:46 AM »
Do you think the crank could be welded and remachined and re keyed
I have a 12/2  Runs like a swiss watch!
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rleonard

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Re: Another Rescue Engine
« Reply #17 on: June 13, 2010, 01:53:58 PM »
The crankshaft is of no value to me.  If someone wants to take on the project of a repair, you can have it.  Probably 2 inches would have to be cut out because the crack is diagonal.

Bob
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contaucreek

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Re: Another Rescue Engine
« Reply #18 on: June 13, 2010, 02:40:21 PM »
I was thinking about that broken crank. Could it have the broken end cut off then faced true then be drilled and tapped for an aux pulley. Obviously the pully/crank should be machined with a step for centering but it could provide light duty power for something. Left hand thread required too  ;D
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rleonard

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Re: Another Rescue Engine
« Reply #19 on: June 13, 2010, 04:48:14 PM »
Hi Paul,
The crack is right at the end of the bearing.  In between the bearing and the flywheel.  Now that it is out, I'll snap another picture of it.  Anything can be repaired with time and money.  If I had to repair this, I would look at replacing the shaft all the way back to the crank throw.  Cut the shaft off at the throw, machine a press fit for a new shaft, push it in and weld both sides, anneal, cut a new key-way.

Bob
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rleonard

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Re: Another Rescue Engine
« Reply #20 on: June 14, 2010, 02:30:38 AM »
I has to try some added lighting and different angles to show the break clearly.  45 degree failure usually indicates a torsional fatigue issue.  Regardless it could be repaired but I'd take it back to the throw and replace the entire section.









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rleonard

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Re: Another Rescue Engine
« Reply #21 on: June 18, 2010, 03:25:36 AM »
My rod bearings that I was waiting for came in today.  That enabled some progress, albeit slow and tedious.  Setting piston to head clearance was the first job.  That took me a good part of the afternoon and I got it on the second pass.  Now I could set the heads on, snug up the manifolds to straighten the cylinders, and draw down the head.  Valve train was next and the new injectors installed. 

The flywheels are stripped of several coats of paint.  I have to go over them with the wire brush before I mount them on the crankshaft.  I hope to have that done tomorrow.  Then comes the fuel system and governor linkage overhaul. 

Bob



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contaucreek

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Re: Another Rescue Engine
« Reply #22 on: June 18, 2010, 11:23:09 AM »
Coming together nice !
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rleonard

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Re: Another Rescue Engine
« Reply #23 on: June 19, 2010, 03:26:50 AM »
Flywheels on today and started in on the fuel system.  The filter and lines are all clean and in place.  Made the bracket for the small fuel tank.  I pipe in provisions for a remote tank hookup.  Until this engine gets a permanent home, the small Petter tank will do.  Oil is in, the troughs are full and the oil pump is primed and pumping.

Looks odd with the 25 inch diameter heavy flywheels on.  They are HEAVY!!  I have to use the engine hoist or forklift to budge them.

Bob







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rleonard

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Re: Another Rescue Engine
« Reply #24 on: June 19, 2010, 11:56:03 PM »
Faster - Better - Cheaper  You can have any two, but not all three


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Re: Another Rescue Engine
« Reply #26 on: June 20, 2010, 01:09:33 AM »
Good job bob ;D ;D ;D ;D

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Re: Another Rescue Engine
« Reply #27 on: June 20, 2010, 04:54:34 AM »
Bob...Those are the same flywheels that come on the 6/1's with the "electric" flywheels.  Part of the reason why the SOM's are so heavy.
Stan

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Re: Another Rescue Engine
« Reply #28 on: June 20, 2010, 07:55:37 AM »
Nice job!

However, I'm curious about one thing:

Aren't the alloy pistons lighter than their iron counterparts?

Won't the balance be off since the crank presumably has counter weights calculated for iron pistons?

Thoughts?

Again, nice work.

Steve

rleonard

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Re: Another Rescue Engine
« Reply #29 on: June 20, 2010, 12:41:56 PM »
How the flywheels came to be on this engine is a bit of a puzzle.  The serial numbers on the wheels do not match the engine tag, so it did not leave the factory this way.  They are a set of wheels for a twin because the "factory" stamp for the #2 cylinder injection timing mark is there.  The keyways were damaged at one time and the wheels were fitted for Browning tapered bushings.  IIRC the wheels were machined by an Amish machine shop in Pennsylvania. 

My friend George overhauled this engine shortly before the crankshaft problem.  After the crank failed, some other engine was installed and this was probably a trade in.  He knew that it was in good shape and was keeping it for his personal collection.  Sadly I lost him about a year ago and further history on the engine went with him.

Several local Amish wood shops had Lister twins driving line shafts that ran various equipment.   There were complaints that the uneven firing of the twins caused issues with the equipment and the finishes of the wood.  The heavy flywheels may have been an effort to address this. 

Most shops have now gone to more powerful, multi cylinder engines with hydraulic, pneumatic, electrical, or mechanical drive systems.

Regarding the pistons, Singles up to 6 and twins up to 12 HP came with cast iron pistons.  When speeds were increased to 850 RPM for higher output, alloy pistons were fitted to reduce reciprocating mass, stress on the rod, bearings, etc.  I do not know exactly why this engine was fitted with alloy pistons at rebuild.  Perhaps it was what was available or in stock.  They are standard size and like new, as were the chrome rings and cylinder bores.

Although there is a mass difference between the iron and alloy pistons, at slow speeds the effect on balance is dampened by the mass of the engine.  It seems pretty smooth to me!

Bob
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