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Author Topic: Engines At Work Video  (Read 6386 times)

Dail R H

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Engines At Work Video
« on: April 26, 2009, 02:37:04 PM »
   Hope I can do this right,found a video on another forun . Showes guys sawing lumber using what looks like a changfa ,wit links to several listers worjing also. Here goes........
   www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,37143.0.html
   Let's see if this works


Ratman

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Re: Engines At Work Video
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2009, 07:43:37 PM »
HSE here in the UK would have a field day on this one.  ;D ;D
I like to think the older I get the wiser I become, but I'm not so sure.

Dail R H

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Re: Engines At Work Video
« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2009, 12:23:46 AM »
   I woulda thought this woulda caused more discussion than this.

rl71459

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Re: Engines At Work Video
« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2009, 01:15:34 AM »
Makes me glad I dont work their!  Hopefully they retained their fingers and limb's :o

Dail R H

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Re: Engines At Work Video
« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2009, 04:02:35 PM »
   We need to remember that this is a third world operation,these guys are lucky to have what little equipment they have. Saftey equipment is probably a luxury they can't afford. The engine is a bit small for the saw ,notice the steam rising from the cooling barrel. He had several more videoes linked,a couple of listers. One of them was in cold cliate,had antifreeze circulating in a washtub for cooling.

Stan

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Re: Engines At Work Video
« Reply #6 on: April 29, 2009, 09:20:08 PM »
I think I've posted this before, but as a young kid (maybe 10 yrs old?) I spent many an hour standing beside a 30" or so, saw blade which was being turned by a large tractor driven belt.  It was my job to grab hold of the firewood being cut as it was being cut and turn and throw it on a pile beside me.  My dad would place the large (4" ?) branches on the tilt table and push them into the saw blade and I'd grab the end being cut.  The wood was for a stove and was only 12" or so long so my hands were pretty close to that totally uncovered blade.

I still have both hands, and all my fingers!  It sure teaches you to focus on what you are doing though, unlike many kids today that can't exist without earphones from an ipod in their ear while simultaneously texting on their cell phones, while walking down the street.

I can still vividly remember the sound that saw blade made just whirring around through the air
Stan

WGB

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Re: Engines At Work Video
« Reply #7 on: April 29, 2009, 11:14:53 PM »
So what was that engine?
7 Tanzanian power?

lowspeedlife

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Re: Engines At Work Video
« Reply #8 on: April 30, 2009, 01:07:31 AM »
Great video but i never did find the links to the listers at work. What was i missing?

   Scott R.
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omega 20/2 listeroid

DaveW

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Re: Engines At Work Video
« Reply #9 on: April 30, 2009, 07:10:35 PM »
    Stan -

       Back 50 years or so ago they were called buzz saws.  In the middle 60's the boys in the family ganged together and added central air and heat to the homestead and made the thing less needful.  My youngest brother grabbed it up and still uses it now and again to buzz mesquite for his woodshop.  Nothing like a wood fire and a pot of coffee on a cool fall day - though sometimes not much work gets done.
       
        It is now waiting for a new tralier and cradle.  I've used it without the cradle, but we are all too old now to lift and slide the logs.

        Anytime it gets fired up, a small crowd gathers, the sound brings back memories for many.



Dail R H

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Re: Engines At Work Video
« Reply #10 on: May 01, 2009, 01:11:21 AM »
   When I viewed it on the forestry forum,the links showed up under ,or on the right side. There were a coupla sawmill types ,and several Listers with pumps and buzz saws.
   I only have 4 , but then,I'm in the sawmill  type bizness

 

Stan

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Re: Engines At Work Video
« Reply #11 on: May 04, 2009, 03:50:13 AM »
Dave, that's a fancy one.  Ours was run by a 6" (or so) flat belt driven by the tractor.  It'd buck and jump around as the old tractor farted and backfired.  It kept us all on our toes though.  You'd never turn your back on one when it was running.  It makes me nervous today just thinking about it, but back then everybody did it.  My dad always said the key was to keep the blade sharp sharp sharp.  He was a great supporter of the old saying "a dull tool can bite you harder than a good sharp one, and way more often".  When you think about the force required to use a dull tool, it makes sense. 

We should all remember that when we are trying to use metric or imperial wrenches on Lister BS bolts and nuts!  Nothing will break a knuckle faster than a nut that suddenly thinks it should be round when you are torquing it.

Stan

mactoollover2005

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Re: Engines At Work Video
« Reply #12 on: May 04, 2009, 05:42:35 PM »
I used to use a buzz saw in the mid 70,s. Had a 6" belt attached to the tractor and the buzz saw sat in front of the tractor. used to pull the table forward and place the log on the table and then push the table back on to the blade which was around 36"to 42" ,made a lot of firewood that way.worst part was keeping the blade sharp since a lot of the wood had a fair bit of sand in the bark. memories,lol.
Derek
Still working on finding a lister gennie.
Derek

rpg52

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Re: Engines At Work Video
« Reply #13 on: May 06, 2009, 11:27:55 PM »
I have a buzz saw, waiting to be assembled, with a Wisconsin AHH in the wings to run it.  Like others I helped with one in the 60's, didn't lose any limbs, but still remember the swish of air across my fingers when I got too close once.  Mine has a table on tracks - hope to use it to cut up slabs for firewood, but have to finish my sawmill first.  Plan to have a chute sloped down hill to carry away the cut pieces - to avoid the issue of anyone getting too close to that blade.  Dangerous, but probably not more so than the average Lister without guards around those spinning flywheels.
Ray
PS Listeroid 6/1, 5 kW ST, Detroit Diesel 3-71, Belsaw sawmill, 12 kW ST head, '71 GMC 3/4 T, '79 GMC 1T, '59 IH T-340

Dail R H

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Re: Engines At Work Video
« Reply #14 on: May 07, 2009, 03:08:45 AM »
   Went and got a belt pulley attachment for the tractor on monday,should have one running this week,,,, weather peritting.