Author Topic: Cogen would this work?  (Read 11022 times)

kpgv

  • Guest
Re: Cogen would this work?
« Reply #15 on: January 16, 2006, 03:14:58 AM »
Hi All,
I have a (probably really dumb :-[) question:
(I would like to have a fairly high draw electric load to apply, and for the sake of "Domestic Tranquility" ;D, I want to find a way for my little "project" ::) to contribute to the "house".)
Can a regular 40 gal. hot water heater be "re-wired" so as to reduce the watt load ???.
Mostly, they seem to be 4500w @240v which is way too much for a 6/1.
What if  I disconnect the upper element, and jumper the lower thermostat and feed just one side (the lower element) controlled by the upper thermostat ???. Will this scenario cut the kw draw in half ???( a more manageable 2250w load).

Kevin


rgroves

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 141
    • View Profile
    • Flint Hills Diesel
Re: Cogen would this work?
« Reply #16 on: January 16, 2006, 04:24:48 AM »
While you could reduce the power consumption that way, you would also increase the recovery time for the water heater.  If you have a household that uses a lot of hot water, the last person to take a (cold) shower might not appreciate your project's contribution.

On the other hand, if your water heater never gets behind the demand curve, having a lower power draw could make it within the reach of your 6/1. 

Just don't expect the family to change its hot water usage, at least without grumbling about it.

My approach, which is probably overkill, is that I bought a Bock oil-fired water heater which will take the place of my electric.  It will also make radiant hot water heat possible in my house.  And (this is where it gets a little over the top)  I will make at least a portion of my oil for that heater by pressing canola into vegetable oil with my oilseed press, then converting it to crude biodiesel.  Water heaters aren't as finicky as engines about the quality of the fuel.  Of course I'll also be able to power my generator with veggie oil too.

Hi All,
I have a (probably really dumb :-[) question:
(I would like to have a fairly high draw electric load to apply, and for the sake of "Domestic Tranquility" ;D, I want to find a way for my little "project" ::) to contribute to the "house".)
Can a regular 40 gal. hot water heater be "re-wired" so as to reduce the watt load ???.
Mostly, they seem to be 4500w @240v which is way too much for a 6/1.
What if  I disconnect the upper element, and jumper the lower thermostat and feed just one side (the lower element) controlled by the upper thermostat ???. Will this scenario cut the kw draw in half ???( a more manageable 2250w load).

Kevin


A country boy can survive - Hank Williams Jr.

RobD

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Re: Cogen would this work?
« Reply #17 on: January 17, 2006, 02:37:46 AM »
KPGV,
         I recently replaced the water heater in my house so I have the information on the sizes on heater available at Home Depot readily at hand. From the chart it looks like the water heaters have two elements, top and bottom as you state, however each element is 4500W. This would make the total draw if the heater 9000W. Of course there are other element options of 3800W and 5500W respectively.

One possible solution would be to install some "Point Of Use" water heaters. These are 1440W or 2000W and are 120V single phase. The largest of these is 20 Gallons.

RobD

Andre Blanchard

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 373
    • View Profile
Re: Cogen would this work?
« Reply #18 on: February 01, 2006, 11:16:44 PM »
A 4500 watt 240 volt element will be 1125 watt if run on 120 volts.

_________
Andre' B.
______________
Andre' B

n2toh

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 147
    • View Profile
Re: Cogen would this work?
« Reply #19 on: February 02, 2006, 09:46:44 AM »
Does your state require solar/wind/hydro for net-metering? or can you sell listeroid power to the grid?
About 60 years is all it takes to make science fiction a reality.

Ironworks

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 178
    • View Profile
Re: Cogen would this work?
« Reply #20 on: February 02, 2006, 12:46:17 PM »
Hello,

I have found an electric radiant floor heating micro boiler which would be nice to use as a heat source but the draw back is it takes 12 kw's.  It might work for those of you that have larger gen sets.  It's tankless looks like they use it for pex tubing type radiant floor heat.   I wonder if it draws 12 kw's everytime it turns on or if the load is lighter once the system levels out?  Mayber if there are smaller units you could put one in each room and time them so they dont all kick on at once.

n2toh

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 147
    • View Profile
Re: Cogen would this work?
« Reply #21 on: February 03, 2006, 01:32:39 AM »
if your doing radiant floor heating don't they make electric heaters that can be put in the floor? To avoid the water.
About 60 years is all it takes to make science fiction a reality.

Ironworks

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 178
    • View Profile
Re: Cogen would this work?
« Reply #22 on: February 03, 2006, 02:55:11 AM »
yes but i thought those were just for small areas like bathrooms....I'm not all that knowledgeable about them