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Author Topic: WVO specifications  (Read 7421 times)

Farmboy

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WVO specifications
« on: August 24, 2008, 06:00:52 AM »
I'm wondering if there are any firm guidelines for WVO or SVO use as fuel. I would imagine this has come up before but I haven't found it yet and thought someone might have a link to some research data.

Another good source that comes to mind would be specifications from an engine manufacturer.
Has anyone kept a maintenance log while using WVO?

I have seen quite a range in what is considered acceptable and I'm hoping to nail it down.

Chad

Farmboy

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Re: WVO specifications
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2008, 09:10:17 PM »
Rats, but thanks just the same Jens. A definitive answer is always nice but preventing a pointless search is a pretty close second.
I had reached roughly the same conclusion so far so I'm glad to avoid a long trip just to end up right back where I am.

How about a recommended size for the final filter?

Chad


captfred

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Re: WVO specifications
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2008, 10:18:56 PM »
The engine we're rebuilding - after 9 months of extended heavy loaded operation running 100% unheated wvo - shows serious fuel system problems - the glycerol, or whatever it is, gums up the injectors and pumps, also carbons up pistons, valves etc. (nothing new here).

From day one I've run mine on a duel fuel setup - start and shutdown on diesel, when up to temp switch over to 90% wvo/ 10% diesel -  I depend on the engine daily for suplimentary power but still consider this setup an experiment to see if this system is viable in the longterm (with consideration to maintenance, including parts repair/replacement etc)  Have to wait and see how it looks during the 1000 hour decarbon maintenance

With a 12/2 consuming  1/2 us gal (1.9L) per hour and diesel over $5.50 per gal - long term operation running dino diesel isn't a financial option for me, I really need  free fuel source - wvo/wmo whatever- to keep this a daily operation instead of a once in a blue moon backup generator

Cheers, Fred

rcavictim

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CAUTION regarding used ATF
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2008, 01:42:03 AM »
Re the deposits and gumming - I don't yet know how to test it but automatic transmission fluid is supposed to work well as a cleaner. I am thinking of maybe throwing in a gallon of that every now and then to clear out the system. I am hoping to source it from the local transmission shops.

Jens

Jens,

New ATF ought to be fine but beware that used ATF has very fine abrasive silt in suspension from the bands and clutches in transmissions.  Even after pulling it through a 10 micron hydraulic followed by a 2 micron Cat fuel filter this stuff quickly cokes up the injectors in my VW diesel even if I only mix 20% of the used and filtered ATF with new clean diesel fuel.  I spent a LOT of time playing around with this problem and have decided that used ATF is something to stay away from unless you can vacuum distill or properly filter it.  I do not have a centrifuge to try.  I'm sure that the abrasive fines also cause premature wear on the IP and injector components as well.

That said, because I have enough of the stuff to be worthwhile using I am in the process of making a custom filter that will press the used ATF through 8 feet of Fuller's Earth and kitty litter in a 6" diameter PVC pipe.  This stuff should come out of that filter with even the pink dye removed.  I started the filter two years ago and then got distracted with other projects about halfway through.  Once I can direct my attention away from my current big wind turbine project I need to get this filter unit finished.

Apparently the US Government has an entire department working on this problem.  Ever hear of the Bureau of Automatic Transmission Fluid?  aka BATF?   ;)
-DIY 1.5L NA VW diesel genset - 9 kW 3-phase. Co-gen, dualĀ  fuel
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captfred

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Re: WVO specifications
« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2008, 05:02:52 AM »
Hey Jens,

The friend with the rebuild tried a multitude of exotic fuel mixes - really liked the wvo/rug and the wmo/rug (really fouled up the centrifuge with gunk though).  After looking at the inards of an injector pump run on this stuff as a single source, I'm still inclined, for now, to continue with the duel fuel so that diesel sits in the pump, lines and injectors when the engine is idle.

For testing purposes I'll continue with the fuel mix I'm running with up to 1000 hours (if I get that far ;D) then try a wvo/rug mix after that.  Like you said the rug has some distinct advantages - and it's cheaper too.

Cheers, Fred

Farmboy

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Re: WVO specifications
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2008, 06:54:04 AM »
Thanks guys, this is all helpful information.

The basics, as I am seeing them, would be:

no moisture
pH neutral
filtered to <10 u
reduce the viscosity, with heat or additives, to ensure atomization and to bring the fuel closer to its flashpoint.

How these are achieved is another whole can of worms (hey, do you think worms are a good fuel additive?)

I realize that some find no need to preheat or thin WVO or perhaps even to filter to less than 10 u but I suspect no one is opposed to the notions on principle.

It occurs to me that attaching a filter from the diesel truck engine of my choice beats chasing my tail looking for a specification that may not exist. If the filter plugs (too soon) then I need to improve my process and if it never plugs it is cheap insurance.

Just tonight I got my nose into a copy of the Diesel Engineering Handbook (1969) and as I understand the recommendations for fuel are that steady, high loads and low engine speeds are important as fuel viscosity increases. Sounds like a Listeroid. The author describes the same results you mentioned for failing to heed sound advice.

As far as the side points on various additives go I find those valuable because I never know what will be available to thin the WVO. At the moment it has been my good fortune to be given 100-120 gallons of heating oil. So is it a case of thinning the WVO with HHO or adding lubricity to the HHO with WVO? I guess it depends on which is going to be in best supply.

If anyone would like to mention any important basics I have missed I would welcome it.

Chad