Author Topic: Interesting science experiment  (Read 7214 times)

jens

  • Guest
Interesting science experiment
« on: May 09, 2008, 03:29:20 AM »
removed
« Last Edit: December 26, 2009, 09:18:13 AM by jens »

listeroidsusa1

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 285
    • View Profile
Re: Interesting science experiment
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2008, 01:49:42 AM »
You might be surprised to find out that regular diesel fuel will also precipitate a layer of gunk if you let a quantity sit for a while.

adhall

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 236
    • View Profile
Re: Interesting science experiment
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2008, 01:56:36 AM »
Jens,

Here's a question for you: Was the bucket open to the air during that time period?

If so, I wonder if some sort of chemical reaction could be happening. It would be interesting to see what happens with a closed container.

Best regards,
Andy Hall
JKSon 6/1, 5 kW ST Head, 1992 Dodge RAM Cummins 5.9L Turbodiesel, 2001 VW TDI 1.9L Turbodiesel, 2006 Jeep CRD Turbodiesel, Yanmar FX22D Diesel Tractor

Doug

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3386
  • Why don't pictures ever work for me?
    • View Profile
    • Doug's Petteroid Stuff
Re: Interesting science experiment
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2008, 02:40:25 AM »
I bought an Onan CCK 5 generating set about 20 years ago from an old fellow at a yard sale.

He said it ran fine but had not been used in years.....

The oil was clean and clear and I thought maybe it had been serviced before storage. In fact it had sat so long the oil dropped all the dirt.

Ran great after good set I was I still had
It's a Good Life, If You Don't Weaken

cujet

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 862
  • Lister power rules!
    • View Profile
    • www.cujet.com
Re: Interesting science experiment
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2008, 02:54:17 AM »
Jens,

I have an Alfa Laval centrifuge. I will pull out water, but it will not clarify oil. The sludge you speak of is something that gravity must do, over time. One would think that 30,000G's would do the trick, but it won't. There is something much more complex going on than just simple "heavy stuff goes to the bottom". I think it is more likely that certain elements attract and form larger, heavier compounds that settle over time. Just how much heavy stuff does an engine make anyway? I don't think it is all that much.
People who count on their fingers should maintain a discreet silence

cujet

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 862
  • Lister power rules!
    • View Profile
    • www.cujet.com
Re: Interesting science experiment
« Reply #5 on: May 25, 2008, 12:53:58 PM »
I have run 5 gallon pails of waste motor oil through the Alfa Laval overnight. You would think there would be a layer of gunk on the inside of the centrifuge. There is not. Sure, some obviously heavy stuff and metals were stuck there. But the oil remained as dirty as before. And the centrifuge remained fairly clean.

It simply does not work well. I cannot afford to run 5 gallons of oil for day's on end, in the hopes that it will clean up. I suspect it won't, in fact, I suspect the compounds remain in suspension due to the constant agitation.
People who count on their fingers should maintain a discreet silence

MeanListerGreen

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 305
    • View Profile
Re: Interesting science experiment
« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2008, 02:48:53 PM »
Oils designed for diesel engines are designed to suspend soot particles, so that oil is probably going to be more difficult to clean then oil from a gas engine.....no?
MLG Gib Key Pullers

Doug

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3386
  • Why don't pictures ever work for me?
    • View Profile
    • Doug's Petteroid Stuff
Re: Interesting science experiment
« Reply #7 on: May 27, 2008, 02:47:06 AM »
They are all designed to suspend particals.

Thats what detergents do, some oils are just better at it then others lol.
It's a Good Life, If You Don't Weaken