Author Topic: Ashwemagh 6/1 inspection  (Read 11047 times)

Reno Speedster

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Re: Ashwemagh 6/1 inspection
« Reply #15 on: December 06, 2005, 03:18:55 AM »
Well, I went a little nuts today, I took the head over  to my machine shop and had them hot tank it (to get rid of all the junk under the paint), check the valves and deck it.  The origional surface was actually pretty dinged up and I saw signs of some water leaks when I took the ehad off.  All of the above is no doubt over kill but what the hey, I'll know its right.  Plus I get to paint the head when it comes back so I can have my very own listeroid "testa rosa"!  The new sleeve and rings came today as well.  The sleeve has some rust on it but not in the bore and its very light so it should clean up fine.  I'll shift the sleeve some time this week or next.  I'm doing some work on the building out on the ranch and getting the concrete poured for the generator shed (probably on Friday).  The floor is 11 inches thick where the generator is going, I hope its thick enough!  I'll post some new photos when I get the chance.

Morgan

quinnf

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Re: Ashwemagh 6/1 inspection
« Reply #16 on: December 07, 2005, 04:27:01 AM »
Morgan, so it's to be Ferrari red, then?  Red's a good traditional color on a flywheel engine, if the pics on Smokstak.com are any guide, but perhaps not as traditional as dark green for a British engine. 

Let us know how the hot tanking worked.  If I get bored (pun?) some day I'm thinking I might take mine apart again and really spend the time to make it gleam.  Spray auto enamel and all. 

It'd be great if you could get a pic of the arrangement of the o-rings and the sleeve and cylinder.  I'm curious how they set it up.  Most sleeves I've seen are press-fit.  These aren't.

Quinn

Reno Speedster

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Re: Ashwemagh 6/1 inspection
« Reply #17 on: December 10, 2005, 03:08:51 AM »
Quinn:
   I'll take some pictures when I get it all apart but from what I can see of the sleeve George sent me and the partially disassembled sleve and cylinder block, it looks exactly like the drawings if the assembly in the Ashwamegh manual which came with the engine.   Its proving a little tough to get the sleeve out (a little surface rust as you might expect) but it should come out with a little extra effort.  Take a look at my page (  http://web1.greatbasin.net/~reno-speedster/  )  for some photos of the new engine slab I poured today.  Its got 3.5 yards of fiber reinforced, areated, accelerated concrete with 1/2 in rebar on 2 foot centers in a 5x10 building.  The floor is only 11 inches thick.  Gee I hope its strong enough!  (actually the ground is so rocky where I am that its cheaper to pay for the concrete than the chiropractor!).   I have been accused by some of being a practitioner of over kill.    Anyway, its a purpose built design to hold the 6/1 and a gen head with a little room for tool storage and a place to put my air compressor.  Not very big but it has 3 doors (2 of which give access to both side of the lister for service).  I hope it works as well as the design looks.  Hard to know until its all done and running.


Morgan

quinnf

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Re: Ashwemagh 6/1 inspection
« Reply #18 on: December 10, 2005, 04:11:52 AM »
Morgan,

Looks great.  I see you also got a cricket bat.  Mine is hanging on the wall of my office.  The secreatary occasionallly borrows it and lays it on her desktop  when she's having a bad day.  Sort of like a rattlesnake's rattle.  Dog made off with the ball and I never saw it again. 

There's something rather fetching about a big slab of freshly-poured concrete that can only be made more alluring by bolting a green Listeroid to it! 

I tried to e-mail you earlier but it bounced off your e-mail.  Mebbe my spastic finger.  Anyway, what's with digging in the wireless station dump?  That sounds interesting.  Not many people travel all the way to Alaska to dig in trash.  I take it that's related to your dissertation?

The fiber reinforced concrete is a very appropriate material for that kind of load and vibration.  Did the fibers interfere with the finishing, eg. sticking up out of the slab?  I understand you don't have to put welded wire mesh in it to keep it from hairline cracking.  It'll be interesting to read how much ground-pounding you report with that heavy slab on rocky ground.  If that's a problem maybe mount the engine on pads made from pieces of truck tire tread to absorb some of the concussion.

Quinn


quinnf

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Re: Ashwemagh 6/1 inspection
« Reply #19 on: December 10, 2005, 05:37:49 AM »
Morgan, if the sleeve is hanging up, you might see if you can get some glycerine or liquid dishwashing soap to slide down the seam between the sleeve and the cylinder casting.  Once you get the O-ring to pop out of the recess it's settled in, it should slide out with no problem.  Lay a couple of 2x4s on a hard surface and set the cylinder down on them, inverted so the 2x4s are supporting the casting and not on the top of the cylinder sleeve.  Should be able to step on the skirt of the sleeve and get it to slide out.  If not, mebbe get creative with a hydraulic floor jack and a frame rail of your pickup truck. . . you DO have a pickup truck, don't you?   ;)

As loosy-goosy as my sleeve was in the cylinder, it's gotta be easy to remove.

Persevere! 

Quinn

Reno Speedster

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Re: Ashwemagh 6/1 inspection
« Reply #20 on: December 10, 2005, 06:08:27 AM »
Quinn:
   I'm planning on hanging the cricket bat over the lister in the shed, just in case I feel the urge to play.  Actually I was taught how to play cricket by an old professor who used to play for Queensland.  In normal life I am an historical archaeologist specializing in military sites.  I have been excavating the first comunications system into Alaska ( built by the US Army Signal Corps in 1900) for the last four summers.  I am finishing my Ph.D. and teaching at the University of Nevada, Reno (hence the "how I am wasiting my time instead of writeing my dissertation" tag line on the site)  The shot of me in the log cabin and in the canoe were taken on the Yukon River last summer.  You can tell that they were taken in Alaska because my slug gun is never out of my reach up there.  Very big bears in Alaska!

I am planning on putting a rubber pad under the engine and would be interested in hearing what people have used for this.  I don't have alot of choice but to put things on solid rock.  One there is alot of it on my place and two what isn't rock is old (10,000 years +/-) lake bed which isn't too stable when it gets wet. 

Fiber reinforcement is the way to go with concrete.  Its basically small pieces (about an inch long) of very fine monofiliment.  You can defeinately see it when you are handeling the mud but I have had no trouble with it when finishing.  Some of the heavier stuff can stick out and look like your slab is growing hair but it can be singed off once the slab is dry.  The fiber gives the concrete a great deal of strength and in some applications can allow you not to use steel (though I always do as you can see in the pictures). 

I have the sleeve and the casting soaking in some wd 40 (not the best stuff but not very harmful to rubber)  I think a little jigging and a properly fitted driver will get it out no problem.  I've just been busy as you can see!

And yes, of course I have a truck...and  69 International Scout.  Try the personal message function on the site.  I didn't know it existed but I got one from "hotater" so I know it works.

Take care.


Morgan