Author Topic: Ok, Here's a biggy.  (Read 3548 times)

rmchambers

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 505
    • View Profile
Ok, Here's a biggy.
« on: January 03, 2007, 02:47:32 PM »
Not sure if it would fit in the basement though.

http://www.ultimatestupidity.com/pics/1/diesel/

mobile_bob

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2940
    • View Profile
Re: Ok, Here's a biggy.
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2007, 05:20:49 PM »
boy thats enuf to run all the ST heads in china :)

hopefully they are better in qc than the indians,
would hate to have to work out fits and finishes on that monster
but i bet it be awesome to hear it on start up though

bob g
otherpower.com, microcogen.info, practicalmachinist.com
(useful forums), utterpower.com for all sorts of diy info

swedgemon

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 28
    • View Profile
Re: Ok, Here's a biggy.
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2007, 12:16:58 PM »
About 20 years ago in Belvidere, NJ, USA, the Hoffman-LaRoche company installed a stationary Sulzer, smaller, but similar to this one.  It was a 10-cyl, 27,000+ HP unit, turning 120 rpm.  It had a 3-ft bore and 6-ft stroke.  They had serious cylinder-wear problems because the cooling system was part of the plant cooling water system instead of being dedicated to just that engine and they had fuel cleanliness problems for a while until they figured out how to properly run the DeLaval centrifuges that were "cleaning" the #6 fuel oil.  There were 3 huge Brown-Bovari turbochargers (6-foot diameter) up on the top deck and one could stand on a cylinder head and feel the combustion taking place under your feet.  The fuel injection pumps were the size of a Cat D-8K engine and the fuel injector nozzles were about 6" diameter and 30" long.

Probably the most interesting aspect of this engine was torqueing the cylinder head nuts.  The cylinder head was set in place by overhead crane and the cylinder nuts were run down hand-tight.  Then a large spider-looking unit was lowered over the whole cylinder head...over each cylinder stud (with the hand-tight nut in place) was a coupler nut, which was run down over the cylinder stud threads sticking up through the head nut.  When all of the coupler nuts were in place a Port-a-Power hydraulic unit was fired up and hydraulic tension applied to all the cylinder studs simultaneously, stretching the cylinder studs a proper amount.  The head nuts were then run down hand-tight, hydraulic tension on the Port-a-Power was dropped, the coupler nuts unscrewed and the torqueing unit was lifted to the next cylinder...whole process took about 5 minutes.

This engine is gone now, a victim of the NJ DER and bad PR...there was a stack-monitoring unit, hard-wired into the NJ DER in Trenton...the folks in Trenton would look at their meters and if anything looked bad, would write another citation.  Eventually this became a bad PR point with the local folks in Belvidere and H-LaR scrapped the engine.  This engine, combined with a heat-recovery boiler and various other heat-recovery devices, was running at around 90-95 % efficiency. 

I was working for an oil company at the time, suppling lube oil for the crankcase and cylinder oil. To inspect the cylinder walls and look at the piston rings, one would open a hatch on one end of the exhaust manifold and climb inside the manifold with the engine barring controller (to slowly bar the engine over with an electric motor).  If doing a quick inspection (with no cool-down time, as was needed for entering the exhaust manifold), one would open a hatch at the bottom of a cylinder intake box and climb up the intake box (wearing a rain-suit becuase of all the black cylinder oil) to inspect rings and cylinder condition.

Swedgemon
GM-90 6/1

rmchambers

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 505
    • View Profile
Re: Ok, Here's a biggy.
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2007, 01:14:57 PM »
That's pretty cool.   "If you want me I'll be sitting on the intake valve of the number 3 cylinder eating my lunch"

swedgemon

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 28
    • View Profile
Re: Ok, Here's a biggy.
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2007, 09:37:28 PM »
Hello RM,

This is a 2-cycle engine...the one described in the website is a 2-cycle, with an exhaust valve in the top of the cylinder head.  The engine that was at H-LaR was a typical 2-cycle...no intake valves and no exhaust valves.  Below the photos of the pistons and the piston crosshead rod it describes all the spikes coming out of the piston carrier as "oil-spray" nozzles.  On the engine at H-LaR the piston cooling was done by water...there were telescopic tubes running next to the crosshead rod, carrying water to and from the underside of the piston for cooling.

You are right, however...you could sit on a cylinder head and eat lunch...bit noisy with the turbochargers screaming just behind you and a major vibration 2 times per second, but then we own Listers, so maybe we might consider that to be "normal".

Best regards,
Swedgemon
GM-90  6/1