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Messages - ajaffa1

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1
Hi 32 coupe, thanks for the backup, I`m pretty sure this an oil pressure or oil level issue. Hoping it`s oil level, oil pressure issues can be expensive to rectify.

Bob

2
General Discussion / Re: Shop busy work
« on: February 05, 2023, 09:01:30 PM »
Hi Butch, I`m the same, I hate sitting around doing nothing. Fortunately there is enough work to do here to keep my fingers busy for years.
We also heat the house with wood but burn a lot less than you because Australian hardwood is so heavy and dense. You can`t split it with an axe so a log splitter is essential.
I have a crazy plan to build a wet back boiler to burn WVO, linked to underfloor heating it should save me a lot of work cutting wood. It will have to wait till I have some spare time.  :laugh:

Bob

3
I can`t tell from the photo but I think that is the fuel control solenoid which open/closes the racks on the fuel injector pumps. It is clearly working because it opens the racks allowing you to start the unit. Why it would then close the rack shutting down the genny 15 seconds later is a bit of a mystery. Some solenoids have two coils in them, both coils are needed to open the rack but only one is needed to hold it open there is a small internal switch/relay to switch off one coil. That relay/switch may be failing.

Much more likely is a fault in the control panel. Does this unit have a low oil pressure sensor? It could be that oil level is too low and oil pressure drops causing the shut down. Some units also have a low oil level sensor which would do the same thing.

Bob

4
Engines / Re: SR3 Rebuild
« on: February 05, 2023, 10:35:17 AM »
Further to my earlier post, I have had a bit of time to think while walking my dog. Some camshafts have a deliberate waisting to ensure that they break in a safe area. I don`t remember seeing such a waisting when I rebuilt the ST2 but it doesn`t mean it wasn`t there. So any seizure of any of the rocker assemblies could cause a camshaft breakage. Please check all of the rocker assemblies. On the ST there are oil feed pipes to al of the rocker assemblies, I assume the same applies to SR engines, these have a very small bore but they also have a steel wire in them to further reduce oil flow to the rocker assemblies, check they are clear and without corrosion.
My major concern is that this was fitted in a boat, water, oil and bad servicing will inevitably end in disaster. If the problem was with the oil pump then something has been picked up and seized the oil pump. Check the condition of the screen on the pick up pipe. Mine was brass mesh, wouldn`t be surprised if the accountants changed that to steel mesh to save money on later model engines, water ingress would cause the mesh to corrode quickly in a marine application, allowing ingress of detritus and corroded mesh screen.
My best guess is that someone set the tappet clearance incorrectly and the pistons have kissed the valves. check the condition of the valves and look for dents in the top of the aluminium pistons.
One more possibility is if your engine has a fuel lift pump, this is also driven off the camshaft, if the gasket between the pump and the engine block is too thin it will cause undue stress on the camshaft.

Bob



5
Engines / Re: SR3 Rebuild
« on: February 05, 2023, 08:02:38 AM »
Hi Vern, wow that is definitely a broken camshaft. I am surprised it didn`t do more internal damage to the engine. On my ST2 the oil pump was driven off the nearest cam lobe to the governor mechanism, it is a simple piston pump accessed from a large threaded screw in the bottom of the engine. Check it out, if some piece of detritus got into it it could have seized causing the camshaft breakage, also check out the valves, guides and rocker mechanism associated with the breakage.
If you can`t find timing marks, it should be possible to time the engine by finding TDC on each cylinder and doing the math to work out how many degrees before TDC spill should happen. A protractor and a black marker pen should get you very close.

Bob

6
General Discussion / Re: Shop busy work
« on: February 04, 2023, 08:47:51 PM »
Hi Butch, nice work as always, looks like you are planning to supply fire wood to half the US population!  :laugh:
Supply issues are worldwide, Lister parts are becoming harder to source in Australia, they are also becoming dearer. The Old Timer website shows a lot of parts as out of stock.

Bob

7
Engines / Re: Rebuilding ST1
« on: February 04, 2023, 08:34:51 PM »
Hi Farmer, I think the crankshaft should be OK, unless you are going to be relying on this engine as your primary mover. The crank could easily be reground, bearing shells come in under sizes of 10, 20, 30 & 40 thousandths of an inch. What condition is the little end bush in? Not a difficult/expensive replacement, some need reaming to size after fitting.
Diesel engines are a little different to petrol engines, when running them in it is essential to have a sizeable load on the engine or the bores will become glazed and you will not get good compression.
The plunger mechanism is exactly what it looks like: a syringe. You fill the reservoir with engine oil and push the plunger down, this oil then sits on top of the piston increasing the compression ratio for easier cold starting.
Starting these is relatively simple, especially with an electric start. Check the injector pump rack is fully open, bleed the fuel system at each point, there are little bleed screws on the fuel filter and etc. Work your way from the fuel tank to the injector pump, once you have fuel flowing from the top of the injector pump fit the high pressure pipe, do not do up the nut at the top where it fits onto the fuel injector, leave it slightly loose. Crank the engine over until you get fuel squirting out around the loose nut, now do it up. Crank the engine over a few times and it should start.

Good luck.

Bob

8
Generators / Re: Small Permanent Magnet Generator
« on: February 03, 2023, 07:18:05 AM »
Hi Veggie, you need a transformer to convert 220 volt ac to around 30 volt AC ( the frequency does not matter), you then need a large rectifier to convert it to DC and a bunch of capacitors to smooth the pulsed DC into something that your invertor will accept, might also be worth fitting a large ferric core coil to further reduce the fluctuations. At 1000 watts and 30 volt you will be pulling a bit more than 33 amps out of the transformer so It needs to be a big one to handle the load.

Bob

9
Engines / Re: SR3 Rebuild
« on: February 02, 2023, 08:58:32 PM »
The timing marks are stamped into the outside face of the flywheel. They can`t be seen because of the bell housing that surrounds it, there should be a small viewing hole in the front of the bell housing. If I remember rightly there are marks for TDC and injector pump spill.

Bob

10
Everything else / Re: Greetings from Tasmania
« on: February 02, 2023, 08:45:40 PM »
Hi Mike, yes noise is an issue and very hard to do anything about with an air cooled unit that can`t be fully enclosed. The last one I did was a Kubota Lowboy generator, I built it a rectangular concrete enclosure with louvred doors on all four sides. I had to fit stainless steel fly mesh to the inside of each door to keep out vermin and the wretched mud wasps. It worked very well and was remarkably quiet, I`m thinking to do something very similar for this, probably with an in the ground exhaust system. It will go behind the new shed in between the two 5000 gallon water tanks, which should help muffle the sound.
I`m going to hook up one of the 240 volt outlets to the house as a back up for blackouts and the 3 phase to the shed so I can run industrial machinery. Now all I need to do is buy me a milling machine. Not many available in Tasmania: One in Hobart with a stuffed drive motor ($900 for a rewind) and another going for auction next week. I think I might put in a bid at the auction.
The good news is my electrician friend will be back in Tasmania next week so we can start wiring the new shed.

Bob

11
Engines / Re: SR3 Rebuild
« on: February 02, 2023, 07:16:00 AM »
Welcome to the forum Orion, first question: was this an SR3 or an SR3W (water cooled)? Second question, when a cam shaft breaks it usually does irreversible damage, what where the bits you found in the sump, did you replace the camshaft, the bushes what about the cam followers, did someone line bore the new bushes? Not an easy task for a non mechanic.
Assuming you have had all the above done correctly did you number the injector pumps and the shims that sit beneath them? If not you are going to have to spill time each injector pump to ensure it injects fuel into it`s cylinder at the right time. Then you can think about linking the injectors together and bleeding the fuel injectors.

One hell of a project you have taken on, hat off to you Sir!

Bob

12
Everything else / Re: Greetings from Tasmania
« on: February 02, 2023, 05:56:57 AM »
A few more pics

13
Everything else / Re: Greetings from Tasmania
« on: February 02, 2023, 05:54:35 AM »
More pics

14
Everything else / Re: Greetings from Tasmania
« on: February 02, 2023, 05:52:53 AM »
Hi Mike and everybody else, I went and collected my new diesel generator today. Its mounted on a trailer and was built for the State Emergency Service. It has three 240 volt 10 amp outlets and one 3phase 20 amp outlet, so I`m guessing at about 25KVA. I am very happy because I was told it was a Perkins diesel engine when in fact it is a Petter air cooled engine with electric start and etc. The trailer was first registered in 1997 so the generator would be 1996? The hours meter shows 93 hours and 10 minutes!
I don`t have time to do anything with this right now but plan to build a permanent brick enclosure to house it.
A few pics attached.

Bob

15
Engines / Re: Rebuilding ST1
« on: February 02, 2023, 05:08:36 AM »
Hi Farmer, I think the crank will be fine unless it already had a lot of wear in it, bearing shells break down without oil much faster than crankshafts. Did the engine seize? If it did the chances are that it was the aluminium piston seizing in the bore. The camshaft has brass/bronze bushes and should be ok, as should the governor mechanism.
I would take a good look at the condition of the small oil pump, it is situated under a plug in the bottom of the engine and driven off a lobe on the camshaft. It is a simple piston pump and could easily be damaged by lack of lubrication. No point in rebuilding an engine that will restart it`s life with low oil pressure.

Bob

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