Lister Engine Forum

Slow Speed Diesel Engines => Other Slow Speed Diesels => Topic started by: cobbadog on April 29, 2020, 07:45:29 AM

Title: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on April 29, 2020, 07:45:29 AM
I am about halfway into the rebuild of this McDonald 2.5HP crude oil / diesel engine. It left the factory in Victoria on 18th May 1945 so it is coming up for its 75 birthday soon. It was donated to me, well a pair of them were, in the hope that one day I would bite the bullet and get one running, that time has come. It uses a Hyvid / Brons fuel injection system which is a tricky bugger on a good day and of which I know next to nothing about as yet. It took close to 4 days of hard yakka to get the flywheels off as the Gib key heads broke off easily and then it was a case of welding a bolt to it and a slide hammer and the other had to be drilled out and then collapsed. So far I have been at this for around a month and a half found the reason for it being pushed into a corner as the roller for the cam seized up and then wore that cam down and that stopped opening the valves enough to make power. I have had the engine for a minimum of 5 -6 years looking for the damaged or missing parts and the biggest issue was the broken injector which I managed to find one.
Other missing parts but promising just recently are an oil primer for pushing oil down through the water hopper to the piston, rings and gudgeon pin. A cap for the crank case lid which I think I can make and a fuel tank again will make. I've ordered a new set of rings, 6 in total for this engine and have been making new gaskets including the head gasket as well.
I will post a couple of pics of this monster, small in size but bloody heavy when assembles as the 2 engines in the box trailer rated at 750kg flattened the springs.
These pics show both engines waiting to be looked at,drilling the Gib key and finally getting one out and the absolute mess inside the gears.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on April 29, 2020, 07:47:50 AM
Finally today is the unique piston, conrod and big end bearing set up. As you can see you can adjust the compression ration by adding or subtracting the shims. Then a pic of the worn cam gear.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: glort on April 29, 2020, 09:17:50 AM

I have seen and admired these at shows.
Very clever with the adjustable compression.  Obviously they knew that better compression worked to better light off heavier oils. This thing should run great on veg with the comp bumped up.

Never had any idea they were that heavy.  Must have consumed a lot of material in their manufacture and been buggers to transport in their day.

Be keen to see a vid of this when it's up and running.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: AdeV on April 29, 2020, 09:40:39 AM
If it really will run on crude oil, I believe the big oil co's can't give it away at the moment!
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: dax021 on April 29, 2020, 09:46:26 AM
Well done Cobba, thanks for starting this thread.  I shall be following with interest.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on April 29, 2020, 12:37:03 PM
Thanks for the feed back guys. Everything on this engine is heavy and when you go to pick something up you have to be certain that you have a good hold of it. Even the side cover over the gears is solid cast steel and not cast iron so it is that but extra in weight. So far the only light parts are the ones I don't have. All the oil pressure lines were brass tubing as well as the oil primer line but that and one of the high pressure oil lines (all of 7 psi) are now 5/16" copper tube.
Made the ehad gasket today as well. The gasket is a simple ring shaped gasket 1mm thick and fits into a recess in the head and then the top of the bore fits into the recess to seal it off along with 5 "O" rings around the new cooling tubes I fitted into place at the top of the bore. When I can I will put up random pics of the nightmare I started with but we are now slowly getting an understanding that I don't like coming second and this engine will run once again.
My absolute biggest test is yet to come, all of the linkages for the head and injector.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 01, 2020, 06:50:04 AM
Back at the beginning of doing this job I first had to get the engine of choice around to where I was going to work on it. So I winched it onto the carry all of the David Brown 30C Cropmaster, in the background is Lorry our main transport when going to Rallies with our caravan towed behind it. Then there is the good injector that will need stripping and cleaning. The flat belt pulley came off like a dream even though the 3 bolts were badly rusted away and each a different size socket was required to undo them.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 01, 2020, 06:52:28 AM
This is the oil pick up from the bottom of the sump. The original screen was almost non existent so I found some stainless steel 'termi-mesh' used for pest control on houses and soldered it in place. It looks rough but it wont let go.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: glort on May 01, 2020, 07:25:06 AM

Noice tractor Cobba!

Are you sure the termi mesh won't be too fine?  Spose the thing won't get a lot of running and will get a lot of oil changes so probably won't have to worry about any sludge on the screen. Also looks a good size surface area. Almost an oil filter in itself.  :0)

I have been thinking of making a carry all for the little 3 Point I recently made for my little Tractor.  I can well see the advantage of just a small platform for lifting and carrying things. Wouldn't put much over 120 Kg on mine but that's still handy. I'm already slowing down and anything much over 60kg is getting to be bit of an effort to carry round the place.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 01, 2020, 01:12:54 PM
Thanks Glort, I put around a total of 2 years into the D.B and last run was about 6 months of being in a rush. Even this engine when loaded is a counterweight for the steering. When we go to a Rally I usually put the carry all onto which ever tractor is going and an engine on that and a couple of mowers around the truck tray.
I had no choice but to finally replace all the timber on the deck of the carry all as the original had rotted completely. It is 25mm thick hardwood. If I build another one I would use the usual T piece set up for the 3pl pins and use channel iron and some checker plate.
I have done a trial on the engine oil I use in Lorry which is what I will run in this and the oil runs straight through as fast as I can pour it and ambient temps so I dont expect any issues there. Engine also runs at a huge 7psi oil pressure as it only pumps oil to both crank shaft babbit bushes. All other parts are splash fed like the big end and the bottom of the bore and gudgeon pin once running. The gears that drive the oil pump, cam and governor are fed oil by picking it up using the gears and it winds its way up to the top then drips over the roller that follows the cam and operates the push rod to the valve.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 02, 2020, 07:03:36 AM
This is one of the offending gibb keys. Welded a bolt to the gibb key with the head cut off so to use the thread with a nut, then tried using the slide hammer with little result so next was a piece of pipe and try to tighten the nut up. All the time using this oversized "C" burner for the LPG. After the key was out the 3 leg puller was loaded up to pull the flywheel off.
The second pic is of the gibb key that broke off flush with the flywheel and then required many holes to be drilled  through the key to remove as much metal as possible. I actually got a 3/16" hole down the centre and almost full depth when it snapped off. Next was to circle that using 1/8" bit and got four holes and again one snapped off. I kept stepping the small holes up in size until it was either touch the flywheel or the crank shaft then used a home made slotting chisel to dig out the key.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: dax021 on May 02, 2020, 11:34:59 AM
Good one for your perseverence in getting that wheel off.  I would have lost my patience after it broke off like that and taken an 8 lb hammer to the thing
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 02, 2020, 12:33:48 PM
lol, that was just one side, the other one was just as bad but with it's own unique problems. I was about to give up on the first one as my back was hurting after being bent over the mongrel for about an hour straight pulling back on the big new slide hammer I bought especially for this job. I thought one more pull and I felt something let go and it did, The gibb key started to come out.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 09, 2020, 06:48:04 AM
I did like the flame that came out the bottom but when I turned it arse up and really got into it with the heat it went off like a flame thrower. By the time I got the camera out it had backed off to being this sedate little display. Once it had burnt out I continued to get serious with the heat and then I found the lump of crap that fell out. Once cooled I sat it on top to take the pic.
The pic at the bottom is the tool I made up to grab hold of the needle that is stuck inside the body. I have been soaking it for a few days in thinners to try to soften the crap up inside but so far no joy.
This injector has a second stage to it that is off at the moment to give me access to this section. The cap is hel on with a screw that is rock solid and the impact driver is not looking at it so far, just twisting the slot only.

Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 09, 2020, 06:49:33 AM
This is the tool, not me for posting the wrong pic.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: mikenash on May 09, 2020, 10:35:15 AM
I wonder - since the wheels are cast & the crank is heavy - what would happen if you tried to gas-out a snapped-off gib key?  Apart from it shooting molten crap out at you every time you gave it a puff of oxygen?
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 10, 2020, 06:55:15 AM
G'Day Mike, thanks for your interest and question but I have long passed that point and becasue I have been so slack in posting here the story is a light year behind. I have the engine totally stripped down with only the injector to sort out and spare parts to arrive.
In answer to your question I am not sure as I never did buy my plasma cutter and have no oxy set up either. Best guess is that this being cast steel it would blow part of the crankshaft away and possibly part of the flywheel.
The removal of the flywheels took around a total of days worth of hard slog but I won. You can see the sludge that was inside the engine by looking in the side cover and this was nothing compared to what was in the sump.
Rings are being made in N.Z. and will be made and sent as soon as they go back to work. Oil primer pump has been found and will be sent by the end of this month.  Cam gear will be ready to pick up very soon as you will see the wear on the lobe in the pic below.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: mikenash on May 10, 2020, 07:52:03 AM
Cool.  Good progress.  I wonder if it's the same folks who made an oversized ring for me after a "whoops" at the machinists lol
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 16, 2020, 06:33:25 AM
Hi Mike I found a bloke 2 hours south of me that has a wide selection of rings and valves and soon is expanding into piston repairs, interesting.
So at least my rings are being made and along with a huge order of other rings they will then be sent to Oz and then mine will arrive soon after that.
To day I decided while waiting for the electrolysis to hopefully work on the injectors bottom needle I started to make a new pin for the rocker arm to pivot on and add a better oil hole for lube by cutting a groove in the shaft and boring an oil hole halfway down the pin and then cross drilling it. I also reground the end of the rocker arm where it meets the valve stem. Next is the pivoting ball, this will explain itself in the future pics but I may need to make another push rod from the cam follower through the pivot ball to the rocker arm. You will notice the old brazing repair from long ago but this one is better than the other one I have to choose from so this is it.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 17, 2020, 05:35:34 AM
Played around with the linkages today cleaning up the parts and making a special collar to hold the fork from another linkage that operates the injector. I think it is all ready to go together when more parts arrive and try to work out how to adjust it all. Fortunately if I get stuck I now have a good contact who has one of these in running order so I can annoy him with all the questions.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 17, 2020, 05:54:59 AM
While still waiting on the electrolysis to do its thing I played around with some ideas or experiments, why not I say!
First was to see what happens when you use a MIG welder on cast steel, well it looks as if it welds. I will give it a flogging soon to see what it takes to fracture. Some of the valve stems were badly worn on the ends so again what happens when you weld these up with a MIG.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: mikenash on May 17, 2020, 06:41:57 PM
interesting re MIG and cast steel.  I will watch with interest.  Cheers
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 18, 2020, 07:03:32 AM
Many others have been down this track using a MIG on cast steel not iron as there is a difference. Most say it is no problems but still work with  some pre heat and a slow cool and do short runs.
So as I am waiting for parts and my head keeps jumping from one job to another this was play time for today. Straight from the "why not" department and it will come in handy later on for the air cleaner that I have to make. Never tried doing this before and for a first attempt it is ok so this will be it, rough n ready. Tried a few ways to get the little punch to work and in the end I simply cut the sheet metal with the 1mm cutting disc then introduced the punch while holding the sheet metal in place with some flat bar iron and clamps.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: LowGear on May 18, 2020, 01:17:13 PM
Wow!
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 22, 2020, 07:12:29 AM
To continue with the "have a go ya mug" attitude and after being inspired by Ian Rowsal of Custom Garage I decide to have a go at this today. Found a couple of pieces of timber and cut the shape out then made a sheet metal sandwich and used a hammer to dress the edge over to make the lid. It surprised me that it worked so this is my new lid and tomorrow I will attach it to the louvre sided section I made the other day.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 23, 2020, 06:34:14 AM
Rough enough is good enough for this old engine. I made the centre mounting shaft then soldered the top onto the cylinder and this is how it ended up.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: dax021 on May 23, 2020, 11:12:24 AM
So, please excuse my ignorance, but what is that?  A air filter housing?
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 23, 2020, 12:20:20 PM
Yes that is exactly what it will be. I'm not planning in putting any filter inside at the moment but if I have to I will use some stainless steel scourers inside and put some mesh over the hole in the middle. It is similar to an original style filter with the louvres but initially I was just playing around while waiting for parts and this is the end result.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: dax021 on May 24, 2020, 09:13:49 AM
Brilliant.  I would never even thought about making such a thing, and you make it look easy.  Great work.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 24, 2020, 12:37:25 PM
Thsnk you for your kind words. The style is similar to the original but another Aussie pointed out that originally the louvres faced inwards not out. I can live with that and I don't mind being different.
I watch a show on TV named Full Custom Garage and usa show and IAn Rowsall who builds up cars and trucks and buggies did a similar thing to make a fuel tank. This is waht inspired me to have ago as he too made it look simple. To be honest it is a simple thing to do all you need is a couple of pieces of timber cut to shape and clamped together, then the right gauge sheet metal to dress over the edge.
The same can be said about the louvres although Ian went to a shop that had the right machine to do the job but I thought why not try to see if I can doo something similar. Believe me my first attempt was a failure, it did not cut the straight edge and just folded the test piece in half. So I cheated and made the cut using my angle grinder with the 1mm thick cut off disc in it. The rest is as you see it. Mind you again it was clamped for each time I went to make the louvre.
I am now considering making the fuel tank only a bit larger using the same proceedure. It will need to hold around 3 litres of fuel which should be enough for a full days work under load which will mean a full weekend of fun at a Rally when it all comes back on line. Still waiting for some critical parts to arrive, a ring set of 5 compression rings and one oil ring. A pair of new valve blanks so we can make them fit, the cam gear repair being carried out by a welder and the oil primer cup for the pre start up. Once these things are in place it should not take long to put it back together again.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 27, 2020, 06:41:19 AM
Cleaned up the outside of a paint thinners tin to use as the fuel tank. I think it is about 1 litre bigger than standard so it is a long range fuel cell now. I have strengthened the bottom where the tap will go in and made up the mounting brackets to the hopper.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: glort on May 27, 2020, 09:26:27 AM

Don't forget to put a tiny hole in the lid or leave it loose when running, those tins are air tight.  They are also pretty thin so if left sealed, the pump may have enough pull to crush them down under Vacuum.

I wonder if the Clarendon show will be on this year or the local one to me at Menangle in October?
Even though we have only had 100 Deaths in the whole country and the majority of them can be traced to 2 Distinct sources, seems to me everyone is going completely overboard with all this.

I was up with Dad last week in Taree and apart from a few frock shops closing early in the centre, looked like everything was the same.  The checkout chick in the supermarket certainly shared my belief that it was all over the top now.
Dad didn't want to go to the supermarket but was happy to come everywhere else with me and look at a new Tractor, buy a new MIG welder and Check out new toys at the garden equipment place.

Like me, when you don't know anyone that knows any one that knows anyone that got it and with 3000 cases in 25m people, the odds of getting anything are on par with winning lotto.  As I don't see that ever happening, I can be pretty confident of avoiding the china flu.

I'll be up there again next week knocking off more odd jobs and Cutting wood, might have to drop in and have a look at all these toys of yours.... If you aren't scared I'll kill you with the Pox that is!  :0)
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 28, 2020, 07:15:25 AM
Hi Glort,
This system is a gravity system and has no pumps at all, it is so weird that I haven't completely worked it out yet. Yes I will need to drill a small hole in the lid before I paint it silver in colour.
Clarendon Classic 2020 was cancelled about a fortnight back as has the Rusty Iron Rally and the Cranky Handle Rally and The Yesteryear Truck Show, so many others that it looks as if the next rally wont be on until next year.
As for paying a visit that would be nice but we are head down tail up with work so we can hook the van up to head off in the beginning of July.
Was it a brand new MIG or a new replacement 2nd hand? I bought mine new off fleabay and have been so happy with it and any and all bad results are due to operator error. Slowly I am working that part out.
Could we please defer the visit until a bit later please, but it would be good to catch up.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: glort on May 28, 2020, 08:42:57 AM

No Worries, Hope you have a good Trip.

I forgot this is not a " Normal" Type engine. Gravity feed with no air would stop it quick. I'm always amazed at the price fuel tanks go for, both specific and universal types.

Bummer about the rallies being cancelled. I'm really over this China flu and all the Bullshit with it now. It's being turned into some sort of Public control agenda and scare tactic which has all gone way over the top. I was shit scared of this at first because I believe there is a VERY good chance I would not survive it with my afflictions but i'm literally betting my life on the fact the chances of getting it are the same as winning lotto. I'm doing everything I can as normal as the restrictions allow which pretty much mean not eating out and little else different.

I think this has all been way over blown but I also think it's not going to let up any time soon.
I'm disappointed to hear the rallies are all off. I missed the local one last year, Obviously the one for this month was shit canned and it seems the October one will be too.  I like the Clarendon one although it's a very Melancholy thing going there. I like the event but the venue has very painful memories.  I wasn't up to going last year but was going to put my big girl pants on this time round. I hope they still fit next year.

Bought Dad a New Unimig.  They are Italian and a mate has a MIG/ TIG and I have a plasma made by them. The service from the importer is fantastic in my experience. Had some problems with the Plasma Which I think were due to shitty Tips and rung them and their service guy, an Italian bloke could not have more helpful. I could not have been more helpful if I was dealing with Myself! Told me to Drop in any time as they aren't far from me and I gave him a call to see if it was convinent, yep any time and the guy welcomed me like a long lost mate and went over the thing with a fine tooth comb while I was there. Changed the tips, Cut a heap with the thing which was perfect, changed the tip/ electrode again and said there you go. No Charge! Couldn't do better than that.  Funny thing was I had bought genuine tips and he said there were a lot of them that were crap and the chinese no names were generally better. Bought them and had no problem.  Unbelievable!

Dad had his eye on one of their machines before Christmas. When I diagnosed the board was kaput and rang Mig O Mag, the guy there who was also helpful as could be, said they still made them and they would be $130 which I thought was OK.  Dad Obviously really wanted a new, lighter compact machine with more bells and Whistles so we went in to look at the one he saw before. That was a run out special and the replacement was a Tad over 900 and was TIG as well which dad didn't even know what that was despite being a Qualified welder  back in the '60's.  Was all stick and oxy back then of course.

I told the guy TIG was nothing he was interested in nor was all the other crap of a trolley, helmet etc which came as a package which he already has. The machine was a Trade quality one and I said to the guy he's 82, It's not like the thing needs to last 20 Years and he's probably still on the same roll of wire in the old machine as he had 5 Years ago. The guy got a bit defensive about the better machine was 15A and said don't think about filing the pin down, it will Void your warranty.  I looked  and said that's the Plebs way. The shed is all wired in 2.5 as it has to be, that's good for 20A, there is 15A of solar on the circuit back feeding it so there is no voltage drop, quite the opposite, I'd just put in a 15A point and that would be it.  Guy said Oh, yeah, not many people would know how to do that.
Hmm, whatever.

He had a new old stock machine and said If You want to pay cash I can do you this one for $400. It's a 185 A Stick/ MIG Machine so all Dad would need so I couldn't get the money ( lucky I had some cash) out my pocket fast enough.
Dad has the Shakes now so welding will be a challenge or he'll be able to weld better than he ever could, not sure which or I'll be doing it all for him.  He was plenty happy to get the thing that price and the guy threw in a bunch of Tips as well which was a bonus.
I set it up for him before I left.  I don't know he'll be able to re thread the wire if he gets a jam with his Fingers. His eyesight is better than mine since he had his cataracts done last year but sometimes he can't hold a cup that more than half full without getting it on the roof or walls.  It's not parkinsons, it's called essential tremors and not a lot that can be done he could deal with. The main treatment means he couldn't drive and the day that happens will be the week before he gives up and kicks the bucket.

I didn't get a chance to do much with the thing other than load the wire and Dial it in and sticky tape the settings and switches in place so he can't accidently bump them.  I really don't know what he's going to need to weld with the thing but he likes to have things in case so if it gives him peace of mind, it's money well spent at his age.  I told him Just use the stick and I'll bring mine up if he really needs something but that idea didn't suit so now he's happy and content.

I'm going to bring the old machine down and see if I can fix it. It's made like they used to not like they make them now. Great heavy transformer, old school Rectifiers, HUUUGE Caps and what electronics there is look like it was all hand soldered way before surface mount and double side boards were even dreamt of. I'm pretty sure all the board does is control the wire feed speed. I'm going to see if I can just replace the board with a PWM controller and if not, a Mate in Qld told me he's been doing a bunch of these boards for some mining and engineering cos up there and reckons he won't have any problem with it. I'm sure he won't.  I'll have a look and see if he can give me some pointers. There isn't much on it anyway so it's probably just a cap or a rectifier or something simple.

If I can get it going I Might sell it.  I just bought a new one myself otherwise I'd have held out. Dad was going to scrap it because he hates selling stuff and dealing with the inevitable wankers who think things should be better than new or expect the price they want to haggle to includes delivery 100 Km away. I'll sell it for him and give him the money... which he'll probably refuse but I can put it to something else for him.

I'm Going to try and get up there at least every 3-4 weeks now so hopefully plenty of opportunities to catch up later.
Where you plan on going and how long you got off?
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: glort on May 28, 2020, 11:41:53 AM

Just looking on Fleabay. There are an assortment of metal Tanks for Go Karts that may be suitable for stationary engines.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 28, 2020, 01:01:39 PM
Sounds like a good deal on the MIG. Like you say it gives him pleasure that he knows he has it there when he needs it and I too am like that. I have been looking at a plasma cutter but not in a hurry but one day. Are you running gas or gasless on the MIG? I started gasless but I was not doing so well then using the Bunnings gas I bought a gauge and tried it and away I went. I still have the gasless wire and now I have a better understanding on how to use it I may try gasless again. I also know about swapping the polarity around between gas and gasless and I think it was operator error not machine or gas or not that was the issue.
As for catching up we should have settled a bit by end of August early September now that the rallies are done. We still have a few more van trips to do after this one in July as we need to go back to Canberra and this has to be timed with the running of the large steam beam engine at Golburn and we have to cross the border into enemy territory once Anna opens the border to see the little wog great grand son. SO, yes we will catch up just not sure when but soon I hope.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 29, 2020, 07:37:31 AM
Cam gear is home and I started to linish it to shape.
I can't believe the trouble I had posting this here but is good it made it on.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 30, 2020, 06:44:19 AM
The next bit of dribble for today after work gave me just enough time to linish the cam profile but I found a couple of spots that need to be built up higher. The guy who welded this must have known as he mentioned that if I needed any part built up just bring it back, so it will go back to him next week.
Then I fitted both Speedi-Sleeves to the crankshaft. This took all of 5 minutes. I picked up a piece of exhaust pipe that was the correct ID to fit over the sleeve and a couple of light taps to get both sleeves into the correct position.
Not much play time today but at least something got done.
Title: Re: McDonald Imperial Super Diesel Crude Oil Engine
Post by: cobbadog on May 31, 2020, 06:40:41 AM
Well I went back to the job of removing the fuel cup from the injector body. Had no luck with electrolysis only that it is super clean on the outside. So there was no way that the small grub screw would undo even using an impact socket with the screw driver bit in it so I drilled it out of the way. After reading about so many different ways to achieve what I am trying to do today I went down the road of heating and quenching. Using what Dad used to cal a size C lpg burner I started to gently heat the cup and then quench it in water. I did this a couple of times and the last time I gave it full throttle and got the cup to the dullest of cherry red and then quenched it again. Then I left it sitting in water until next time where I will once again look closer at how much I have drilled out and if any more needs to be removed then will go back to the serious heating again. All the time I have been very gently tapping the cup to see if it shows any signs of moving. This tapping is dangerous as this is how the other cup was broken off the injector body, not because of tapping it directly but by using a lever to lift the body out of the head and the slightest movement sideways breaks the cup off. In the instruction book this is made very clear and that when you remove a stubborn injector it is a case of removing the head and prising the cup up.
So this is my SpacEx clean burn launch today.