Lister Engine Forum

Alternative fuels => Other Fuels => Topic started by: n2toh on December 26, 2005, 06:03:54 PM

Title: Heated fat?
Post by: n2toh on December 26, 2005, 06:03:54 PM
has anyone used heated fat to fuel a Lister type?
Title: Re: Heated fat?
Post by: kpgv on December 27, 2005, 07:37:04 AM
I'm interested in burning "WVO" (waste "vegetable" oil) too, like from MickeyD's, which surely has some "fat" in it.
The deal is that the "fuel injection" system will REQUIRE you to HEAT whatever kind of "oil" you propose to burn to a point that the VISCOSITY "works" within the flow and pumping  parameters as designed for regular pump "fossil diesel".
I'm interested to hear more about your "heated fat" idea, and maybe your proposed sources. My success in this endeavour is predicated on free, or VERY low cost "waste" oil.
Where I live, the cost of "grid" power converts to $.80/gal fuel cost to break "even"; The PLUM for me is the "co-gen" hot water to heat the shop, and maybe house hot water too...

Kevin
Title: Re: Heated fat?
Post by: n2toh on December 27, 2005, 01:04:29 PM
I'm interested in burning "WVO" (waste "vegetable" oil) too, like from MickeyD's, which surely has some "fat" in it.
The deal is that the "fuel injection" system will REQUIRE you to HEAT whatever kind of "oil" you propose to burn to a point that the VISCOSITY "works" within the flow and pumpingĀ  parameters as designed for regular pump "fossil diesel".
I'm interested to hear more about your "heated fat" idea, and maybe your proposed sources. My success in this endeavour is predicated on free, or VERY low cost "waste" oil.
Where I live, the cost of "grid" power converts to $.80/gal fuel cost to break "even"; The PLUM for me is the "co-gen" hot water to heat the shop, and maybe house hot water too...

Kevin

I to use WVO in my VW Passat, but wanted to know if anyone has been using fat like if they worked for a butcher or something.
Title: Re: Heated fat?
Post by: hotater on December 27, 2005, 03:59:20 PM
Maybe the real question is--- IS there a difference between corn/peanut/canola oil and lard.  I don't think there is.  Fat is oil is fuel.  Both have non-fuel components and burn better if hot.  The bio diesel process takes out the non-fuel parts but the oils can be used as is if the engine is started and stopped on mineral fuel.

One of my hunting partners owns and operates a large meat packing company.  He has large vats of pig scraps being rendered into lard 24/7.  One of his workers brought a whole salmon to work one night and wrapped the fish in chicken wire and dropped it in the rendering vat to cook it.  The fish smell ruined 1000 gallons of lard. (and cost him his job.)  ;)
  *Many* fast food places uses lard or a mixture of animal and veggie fat to cook chicken, french fries, and donuts.  I think our "WVO" may be pig parts also.
Title: Jet B
Post by: Mr X on January 07, 2006, 02:03:57 AM
For a number of years I have been hording contaminated jet b helicopter fuel. I heat my house with it. I have to mix it 50/50 with diesel or jet a . I use the old style space heater with a carburator. Enough on that my question is dose any one have experiance with burning jet a or b in their roid . Im sure oil added for lubricity is a must but at what ratio
Title: Re: Jet B
Post by: n2toh on January 07, 2006, 05:47:39 AM
For a number of years I have been hording contaminated jet b helicopter fuel. I heat my house with it. I have to mix it 50/50 with diesel or jet a . I use the old style space heater with a carburator. Enough on that my question is dose any one have experiance with burning jet a or b in their roid . Im sure oil added for lubricity is a must but at what ratio

dono about jet fuel in a roid but I knew a guy who bruned jet fuel in his VW diesel, he said it didn't run as good as #2 because of the higher distillates in the mix.
Title: Re: Heated fat?
Post by: SHIPCHIEF on January 14, 2006, 06:11:33 AM
http://journeytoforever.org/biodiesel_yield.html
this refers to yeild from various veggie oils. It starts in Kg per Hectar crop yeild, but it also identifies the major oil crops, and the cetane number, as well as other fuel properties of each. It's a good starting point.
Unrefined veggie oil has glyserine and other constituents that are harmful to diesel engines. Some engines tolerate them better than others. Listeroids with precombustion chambers seem more tolerant, although the sellers of GM90 engines may want to comment as well. Some modern engines pack up for good after running for as little as 20 hours on pure palm oil.
Valve and ring problems are common, and more frequent service teardowns for cleaning would be expected. On the other hand, operating expenses would be a whole order of magnatude lower if it works!
Third world scientists are vitally aware of the benefits of running engines directly on fresh squeezed oil. Research on which engines run best, as well as which oil types etc will work is an on-going afair.
Our Listeroids could be at the forefront of a second technological revolution ;D
Title: Re: Heated fat?
Post by: Stan on January 14, 2006, 05:11:41 PM
I"ve seen some comments to the effect that carbonizing might be a problem with bio fuels.  I hope everyone is aware that the original Lister manual states quite plainly that it must be torn down every 1000 hours to scrape the carbon off the piston top and head, as well as cleaning the jet.
Stan
Title: Re: Heated fat?
Post by: Procrustes on January 24, 2006, 04:38:41 AM
Would it be wrong to obtain fuel from liposuction clinics?
Title: Re: Heated fat?
Post by: Joe on January 24, 2006, 01:31:37 PM
I read somewhere that a a group was putting together a project to go on a bus trip to promot a healthy life style or some such and the bus was to be powered by their own bodyfat retrieved from liposuction...

Joe

Title: Re: Heated fat?
Post by: Procrustes on January 24, 2006, 04:21:07 PM
I hope the exhaust doesn't smell as bad as I'm guessing it does.
Title: Re: Heated fat?
Post by: kpgv on January 24, 2006, 04:57:34 PM
Might be a way to test the "You are what you eat" theory ;)
Title: Re: Heated fat?
Post by: n2toh on January 24, 2006, 06:30:20 PM
I don't think human fat would smell any worse than the pork and turkey fat I've burned
Title: Re: Heated fat?
Post by: Thomas on January 24, 2006, 07:31:35 PM
If you have never smeled human fat hope you never do!   Thomas
Title: Re: Heated fat?
Post by: kyradawg on January 24, 2006, 08:53:15 PM


Peace&Love :D, Darren
Title: Re: Heated fat?
Post by: solarguy on March 02, 2006, 05:09:49 PM
The big difference between animal fat fuel (or hydrogenated veggie oil, aka shortening) and liquid vegetable oil fuel, is viscosity.  Once you heat the product to 180F, the viscosity is fine.  Keep in mind it has to be approx. that temp AT the injection pump and injector.

Biodiesel chemically changes the fat/oil into a different product that has a room temperature viscosity that is much closer to petro diesel and requires no heating or additives at above freezing temperatures, at least for most feedstocks.  That would be the lower risk, higher cost per gallon solution.  In my neck of the woods, input cost for warm weather biodiesel is about 0.60 per gallon if you get the oil for free.

Good luck and have fun!

troy

Title: Re: Heated fat?
Post by: akghound on April 25, 2006, 08:49:56 PM
I have used WVO Waste Vegetable Oil in my Listeroid for over a year now. It is important to heat it up enough to get it working properly, as suggested 180* (at least). As for using animal fat, I don't know. I'm sure there is plenty of energy in it and if heated enough it would most likely burn in our engines.
Ken Gardner
Title: Re: Heated fat?
Post by: rcavictim on July 25, 2006, 02:26:20 PM
Would it be wrong to obtain fuel from liposuction clinics?


With the increasing cost of energy and the continuing breakdown of moral conduct I had a morbid thought that perhaps in the future we may see a new trend develop.  Drive-by liposuction attacks.

Evidence of an attack viictim often found dead in a ditch is skin that curiously is too big for the body.