Author Topic: Compressor oil grade  (Read 502 times)

Johndoh

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Compressor oil grade
« on: May 13, 2019, 10:11:45 PM »
I was at the tyre shop today and I noticed he had a 50l compressor sitting in the office. A few words 20 changed hands and I have it. He said the motor was working so I took the head off cleaned the reed valves and I have a 20 compressor. The oil was black and thin so it's been drained. My question is can I use car engine oil? I have 10W40 semi synthetic and 5W30 synthetic oil in the shed. I could give the local parts guy 10 for 500 mil of compressor oil but I'd hate to do it if I didn't have to. The compressor is Bergin branded so likely Chinese. Any ideas?
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38ac

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Re: Compressor oil grade
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2019, 11:26:22 PM »
 Not familiar with that brand but if it is recipricating (piston and crankshaft) compressor I used 10w 30 motor oil for 50 years before I read on the internet that it could not be used. Thus I ran out to the shop and drained it real quick before my compressor went up in flames!!!😁

   it is best to use non detergent if one is going to buy the oil anyway but since you have the other on the shelf Id dump it in and fret it not one little bit.  Lubricating a compressor is far from rocket science.
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glort

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Re: Compressor oil grade
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2019, 11:51:24 PM »

 I have an old one lunger compressor with a separate motor, the way they all used to be.  Literally decades older than me.  I went to change the oil when I got it and spent a lot of time running round to find the " Right" oil  Till a family friend and guru mechanic came round, Laughed and said put engine oil in it.
Knowing this guy walked around with a pair of Micrometers in his pocket and was pedantic, I knew if it were good enough for him it would be as good as it got.

Of course thinking about it, thing is the same as an engine only with out the combustion and stresses. If the oil is good enough for an engine it has to be good enough for a compressor.

Only thing I do different now is use Diesel oil although given they use ATF in gearboxes, I have no reason to think that wouldn't work fine as well and may even be better from having less drag.

Johndoh

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Re: Compressor oil grade
« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2019, 12:01:56 AM »
Thanks guys! I'll go with the 5w30 it's turbodiesel oil. Glort I like your logic!
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38ac

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Re: Compressor oil grade
« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2019, 01:38:01 AM »
 Some of the experts on the internet really make me laugh. Read once that engine oil could not be used as it was not designed to take the heat generated by an air compressor ::)
As said the multi grade woukd be beneficial for starting up.
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mikenash

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Re: Compressor oil grade
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2019, 09:08:44 AM »
Probably because there a many kinds of compressors?

The expensive modern screw ones that have a mix of compressed air and oil mist and which catch the oil "on the way out" with a separator are fussy buggers, expensive to maintain, unforgiving if not maintained properly, and extra expensive when they blow up.

With one of them, using the right oil is a must IMHO

It's probably folks thinking about them that are finicky about the oil

glort

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Re: Compressor oil grade
« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2019, 11:56:02 AM »

I doubt there are many people that have screw compressors at home. Probably not a lot that have scrolls or vane types either.
Screw compressors in industry would most likely be serviced by some maintence person that didn't have to ask about the oil or be on a service contract and looked after by a factory tech. 

As far as those screaming, annoying POS little chinese things go, wouldn't matter what you put in them. Things ship themselves in about 10 hours of use no matter what. Mate of mine bought one years ago and we were in his shed and he fired it up.  i damn near soiled myself at the noise. I had never heard one like that and didn't know what the feck had happened. Couldn't believe it was a compressor going that fast and making such a feverish racket. 

I Couldn't say how many of those Little things I have seen at scrap yards, by the side of the road and sitting in the open abandoned over the years. must be 100 and the airtanks are often on all sorts of other DIY setups being the most well built part of the whole pathetic machine.   OTOH,  I have seen precious few " Traditional"  long stroker, slow revving compressors thrown away and the couple I can recall were monsters at least 50 yo from factorys that were closed down.

 I remember a couple at a scrap yard that were triple Cylinder, had 2" outlet pipes from the head and were taller than I am.  Must have weighed several tons each.  I doubt there would be much use for things that big any more in this age of battery tools.

Johndoh

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Re: Compressor oil grade
« Reply #7 on: May 14, 2019, 04:34:29 PM »
I searched on the interweb for Chinese compressor manual and I got one for a similar size machine. The manufacturer recommends 10-40 oil. I put 5W30 in it and I hope it will do ok. The motor was filled to the top with used engine oil no wonder it didn't work and had oil all over it. Now it's at correct level in the little window and it fills the tank and then shuts off. I haven't had luxuries like that in a while and now I can use my rattle gun as well.
It runs at 2800 rpm and there's no ignition or combustion so Glort is again annoyingly correct! I have no idea what these guys on forums get their information like use only non detergent oil and so on. My fully synthetic oil has to be way better than the non detergent oils. I only use cheapo 10W40 in the lawnmower and generators never had any issues.
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LowGear

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Re: Compressor oil grade
« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2019, 05:31:32 PM »
The "logic" or guideline head set I hear and am now repeating is that non detergent oil is less likely to suspend particulates which might make a difference in a filter-less oil system.  In reality, non detergent isn't always easy to find and oil is cheaper by the case.  I'm betting you all know what I use in most everything.

I'm currently running ATF for chain/bar oil in my pruning chainsaw as the vegetable oil I was using on some high sap trees kind of solidified.  A bit of gasoline and elbow grease later I got the high detergent ATF to flow.  So much for brainstorms.  Once I go through the liter of ATF I'll go back to the rather heavy bar oil.  But even there I save at least 50% buy purchasing it in 2 gallon bottles rather than the 2.8 oz premix bottles.
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Johndoh

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Re: Compressor oil grade
« Reply #9 on: May 14, 2019, 06:06:07 PM »
The "logic" or guideline head set I hear and am now repeating is that non detergent oil is less likely to suspend particulates which might make a difference in a filter-less oil system.  In reality, non detergent isn't always easy to find and oil is cheaper by the case.  I'm betting you all know what I use in most everything.

I'm currently running ATF for chain/bar oil in my pruning chainsaw as the vegetable oil I was using on some high sap trees kind of solidified.  A bit of gasoline and elbow grease later I got the high detergent ATF to flow.  So much for brainstorms.  Once I go through the liter of ATF I'll go back to the rather heavy bar oil.  But even there I save at least 50% buy purchasing it in 2 gallon bottles rather than the 2.8 oz premix bottles.

You use ATF as a chain lubricant or do you mix it in a 2 stroke engine?
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glort

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Re: Compressor oil grade
« Reply #10 on: May 15, 2019, 12:27:35 AM »

Not that I have seen every engine out there but the ones I have seen that don't have a filter are generally splash lube.  i have severe doubts that any particles are going to remain settled in an engine with a dipper rod or slinger thrashing through the oil. In the case of small industrial engines the sump is not usually very deep either so I find the ability for the particles to settle and remain  undisturbed in any oil to be very remote.

Engines with pressure lube do tend to have filters or screens at least.

I'm sure there are exceptions but thinking of the variety of engines I have which are all " Modern" designs of the last probably up to 40 years barring the roid which would fit the thrashed oil category anyway, I can't see non detergent oil making a difference.
I don't know what other additives are or are not in non detergent oil but I know there are a lot of friction modifiers and other things that will help any engine and that I want in there.

As I have long said, the brand or grade of oil is far less important than changing ir regularly and keeping it clean. I have no doubt a supermarket no name brand of modern oil with all the additives and detergents would do better in any engine if changed regularly than a non detergent oil that was run longer.
Or gut feeling says even run for the same time.

I also find the ideal of an engine oil extending engine life pretty laughable.
How long does a specific engine last in the first place? How do you know if you got better or shorter engine life to know if that invariably more expensive oil paid off or you could have got the same result if you put walrus blubber in the thing?

There are a heap of variables to how long an engine lasts like load, operating conditions, Maintenance and Id suggest production tolerances and the way the thing actually came off the line would have a bigger influence than the oil yo put in providing it was decent and changed at the right interval.
Many people whom are into performance engines know you can get a brand new one, pull it down and plenty of components will be out of spec before the thing is fired.  I have done the same thing on small engines. One reason I have a passionate disdain for anything with Briggs on it and would take a Chinese engine over one any day.

Again, I'll stack up an engine running on supermarket brand oil that is changed more regularly to reflect the price difference of a Brand name oil to last longer.  And lets face it, the supermarket chain don't own a refinery so the greatest odds are you are buying a name brand oil that could be sitting next to the cheap stuff on the shelf in a different package.

When it comes right down to it though, I usually buy whatever is on sale at the parts joint because that's usually cheaper than the supermarket stuff anyway. It's always Multi grade oil so I pay no attention to grade either. Don't even have to worry much about Diesel and regular oil either now as the regular stuff covers Diesels anyway.


Depending on what I'm cutting, I use either Veg oil for the bar in the chainsaw or engine oil. If it's something I want to use I'll probably go veg, if it's fire wood, engine oil, used or new, whatever I have on hand is what goes in.  It's only really to lube the bar you have to worry about because the chain will be worn down and replaced many times before the bar is worn out.  Taking care of the bar looks after the chain by happy co incidence.

And to upset the Purists, I have used veg oil as a lube oil  in 2 strokes for years now. Mainly in some larger mower engines that are easy to strip down and de coke because they can clag up depending on how they are run.  The ones I use it in I have rebuilt over 100 of so I enjoy doing it now for old times sake.
 As with any oil I tend to run it at a higher ratio than recommended to make sure the engine is getting all the lubrication it needs and more.  If it blows a bit of smoke, who cares? I don't understand this  proclivity people have that a 2 stroke shouldn't blow smoke. In my book, Yes it should!

When I see a bit of smoke it's a visual indication the engine is getting lubed so it's a plus not a drawback to me.
The one thing I won't use in 2 strokes is oil designed for mowers and garden equipment. That has to be bottom of the barrel 2 stroke oil and is far worse than the veg I use. In commercial oil I will only use stuff designed for motorcycles and the like that is higher performance stuff because the cheap oil in 2 stroke is in fact crap that will shorten engine life enough to be very noticeable.  It will form carbon and deposits faster than the veg will and that's saying something.  For chainsaws and things I'm not wanting to tear down I always use racing grade 2 stroke.

A lot of chain oil is just Veg oil based now anyway with the stuff taken out to stop it polymerising.
It's a very simple lubrication task. Once more walrus blubber would do the job just fine and I don't see the need to pay a fortune for bar oil that is essentially one shot and it's gone anyway.  I have the oiling turned up anyway because I'm not worried about the cost of the bar oil so again i believe the thing is getting better lubed with the incorrect oil the way I use it than it would if it was set right with the correct  ( expensive) oil.

When cutting Dry Australian hardwoods,  I don't think you can ever have doing much oiling!

LowGear

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Re: Compressor oil grade
« Reply #11 on: May 15, 2019, 05:38:30 PM »
Yeah, Oops.

Quote
I'm currently running ATF for chain/bar oil in my pruning chainsaw as the vegetable oil I was using on some high sap trees kind of solidified.  A bit of gasoline and elbow grease later I got the high detergent ATF to flow.  So much for brainstorms.  Once I go through the liter of ATF I'll go back to the rather heavy bar oil.  But even there I save at least 50% buy purchasing it in 2 gallon bottles rather than the 2.8 oz premix bottles.
Quote

I forgot the sentence about both bar oil and 2 cycle mix.  Bulk is the way to go as long as your using ICE equipment.  Of course all of my savings were eaten like cheap candy on Halloween when my wife got angry with the frozen chain saw and bought a Ryobi battery unit.  Sometimes we be just too cleaver for our own good.
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glort

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Re: Compressor oil grade
« Reply #12 on: May 15, 2019, 11:51:18 PM »

I was only looking at Ryobi electric Chainsaws yesterday.
First thing I discovered is that the US at least has a model that has been available for over a year and all the reviews I found said it was a great improvement on the old model.  Seems they are unloading all the old ones here before we get the new and improved one as it's not even on the local site nor is the 40V one that's also been around a few months in the US.
I did see on the Ryobi site they have put a " Limited Stock" tag on the 18V model we have here so perhaps the new model is due shortly.

Another thing I noticed is a lot of the reviewers saying Ryobi sent them the saw to do a vid review on. The interesting thing is many of these Channels had less subs than mine has, some less than half so I'm thinking maybe I should be looking at a new angle for my YT vids and approach some companies for tools and equipment to do some reviews on?

Would be different to mucking round with burners all the time although I wonder if the Australian branch would be as keen for Publicity in this medium as they seem to be in the US?

BruceM

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Re: Compressor oil grade
« Reply #13 on: May 16, 2019, 12:43:52 AM »
I'm sure sheeple are global.

mikenash

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Re: Compressor oil grade
« Reply #14 on: May 16, 2019, 08:53:28 AM »
The electric chainsaw is a wonderful tool for women, older folks or people with big gardens

Once you own one you won't be without it I would guess.  Just like me and the 18V battery angle grinder