Author Topic: Lister sheep shearing and crutching plant  (Read 325 times)

Cockie

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Lister sheep shearing and crutching plant
« on: May 10, 2019, 01:22:28 AM »
I have a lister shearing plant to restore, and I'm wondering about the date of production. Although it consists mostly of angle iron the bearing housings and tumbling tommy clutch assembly all have lister in the castings or engraved on the brass covers. I have most of the plant, frame, engine and cooling water tank, but I'm told they didn't all start life together. The complete plant photo is from a museum, not the unit I have. Any information about these plants of leads to parts such as the down tubes would be much appreciated.

Cockie

38ac

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Re: Lister sheep shearing and crutching plant
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2019, 12:12:42 PM »
Hello and welcome to the LEF.
There may be a fellow or two here that knows a bit about those but not I.  I do know that there are bits and pieces around for sale as I have seen them advertised. There is a Face book group named Stationary Engine Enthusiasts which is based primarily in England and I am certain someone there can help. You must join the group to post. You could also subscribe to Stationary Engine Magazine, another good source of parts and information. There may be other active internet forums but I am not aware of them. You can find out when the engine was built and where it was shipped by contacting Doreen Edgington and sending her the information from the data plate. Google her name for contact information.
Collector and horder of about anything diesel

dieselspanner

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Re: Lister sheep shearing and crutching plant
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2019, 10:04:47 PM »
+1 for Butch's welcome.

Nice to see a Lister project in the hands of an enthusiast.

Wherever you glean information from please return here and post updates, most of us on here are mechanically bent voyeurs,  so whatever you are doing will be of interest, honest.
Cheers
Stef
Tighten 'til it strips, weld nut to chassis, peen stud, adjust with angle grinder.

ajaffa1

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Re: Lister sheep shearing and crutching plant
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2019, 11:38:27 PM »
Hi Cockie, a nice project. recommend you contact Rob at old timer engines, he should be able to help you with information and any parts you require. https://www.oldtimerengines.com.au/contact_us/

Bob

Cockie

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Re: Lister sheep shearing and crutching plant
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2019, 11:59:59 PM »
Thanks to you all for the leads, it's much appreciated. I have the book the Lister D Story and have dated my engine to between 4-2-1937 and 14-4-1937. Also I was wondering about the colour of the cooling water tank, which had faded yellowish paint, and I am wondering if the tank may have been originally painted pea green as was the war finish paint as per the Lister D book. As I'm told the three items didn't start life together, I am thinking of painting the cooling tank pea green with the stencilled "war finish" wording.
Cockie

Cockie

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Re: Lister sheep shearing and crutching plant
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2019, 12:13:00 AM »
Forgot to say 38ac, the engine has a brass plate stating it was sold by Winchcombe Carson, Brisbane, so I know it was probably used in the wool industry, in some form. As it has the exhaust configured horizontally, I don't think it would have been on a shearing plant, as they have a vertical exhaust, to get the fumes away from the shearers. My interest in shearing plants was raised by me obtaining a 1927 Coopers plant, and my memories of my father shearing up to 2,500 sheep on the family farm when I was knee high to a grass hopper.

glort

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Re: Lister sheep shearing and crutching plant
« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2019, 04:39:45 AM »
Forgot to say 38ac, the engine has a brass plate stating it was sold by Winchcombe Carson, and my memories of my father shearing up to 2,500 sheep on the family farm when I was knee high to a grass hopper.

Wow!
He must have been a gun Shearer!  Even at 200 a day that's over a months work.  Hard, hot, back breaking work that only a real man could handle day in day out.  I'd be lucky to do 5 a day. And maybe only for 1 Day.  Damn sure my back wouldn't take bending over and working like that  for even a few hours let alone weeks at a time.

Despite all the modern advances in agriculture and the way computerisation and mechanisation has come into it, the shearer of 100 years ago would find little difference and certainly not be out of work on any sheep station of today. It's still the same hard manual job it was 100 years ago and probably will be the same in another 100 years.

I'm really enjoying seeing the sheep the neighbour has next door.  They prompted me to cut down the over grown hedges they love feeding on so much. they have more than what they know to do with ATM.
Funny things, you cut down some branches and give to them and they run over to get it.  They eat till I thought they were full then walk off. You come out later and cut some more and they come running up again.  they have a chew and walk away till you put something more out then they will run up to that even though there is heaps left aon what you gave them before.

Seems they want the latest offering and will start eating it even if they weren't hungry enough to eat what you gave them an hour ago.

Might have a look at getting an Ultimate Aussie pet of my own.
 You can bring your sheering plant and give it a work out and take the fleece for your trouble.

glort

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Re: Lister sheep shearing and crutching plant
« Reply #7 on: May 22, 2019, 07:05:33 AM »

Check out the signage in the background.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=etCJimdpeno

dieselspanner

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Re: Lister sheep shearing and crutching plant
« Reply #8 on: May 22, 2019, 07:52:47 AM »

Impressive!

That's around 35 seconds a sheep, with AC DC drowning out the roar of the overworked Lister!

I could handle the machinery and the music but like you Glort, I don't think my spine would last the first half dozen sheep.

Cheers
Stef
Tighten 'til it strips, weld nut to chassis, peen stud, adjust with angle grinder.

glort

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Re: Lister sheep shearing and crutching plant
« Reply #9 on: May 22, 2019, 12:58:44 PM »

I guess some things would be a bit different to the shearer from 100 Years ago.

No gramophones playing rock music back then, no air con blowing on him probably no electric light in the shed and Certainly no women!

At the going rate of $3 per sheep, that man would be earning about $630  an hour.  Good money but he IS earning it.
I doubt he could do it for much longer than 2 Hours although at $1200 a day you probably wouldn't need to work more than 2 Hours. Average shearer can do 100 a day, gun shearer 200 so he'd be doing a good days work in 2 hours anyway.

A bloke in the UK supposedly  did 735 in 9 hours. $2205 for a days work.
No mention if he could ever walk again or was bent over like a question mark for the rest of his days but he probably has a nice Plaque to show for it.   :laugh:

Cockie

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Re: Lister sheep shearing and crutching plant
« Reply #10 on: May 22, 2019, 10:58:03 PM »
Yes hard work shearing, I guess that's why I was an electrician!

I think the735 was achieved by a Kiwi, but it was performed in the UK, that equates to a sheep every 44 seconds I wonder if he had wide combs on his handpiece.

Dad would take about 6 weeks to shear his lot, as he had to skirt and roll the fleece himself, as he was a one man band, he also had other farm duties as well. He hated the shearing as at the end his hands were as soft as an office worker's due to the lanolin.