Author Topic: How best to set up a Lister A  (Read 356 times)

cobbadog

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Re: How best to set up a Lister A
« Reply #15 on: May 06, 2019, 06:41:08 AM »
This was a Solex (another Pommy made one). It is an updraft carby from the early 50's.

I too ahd a go at making the manifold gasket for the same tractor. It had thin sheet metal in the middle and was a real brute to cut to shape. Even with wad punches and soft wood under it was more like a mulching exercise. Using my best Wiss snips was not as good as I wanted. In the end I sent a cardboard one I hammered out and got it made down in Sydney.
Coopernook - the centre of our Universe.

glort

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Re: How best to set up a Lister A
« Reply #16 on: May 06, 2019, 09:28:15 AM »

I have made quite a few gaskets now by either scanning the original gasket or the part itself  if it's small enough to put on a flat bed scanner.  Victa lawn mower and other engine gaskets are easy as they are a simple design and you can do them easily with punches and a scalpel.
Anyone that has a flatbed scanner should give it a go. At worst you can always print on thick paper like photo paper and then glue that down on the material you want to cut out so it's perfect.

If you do a 1:1 Print you have a perfect template and on printers I have had, was easy to put gasket paper and thick cardboard in to print on.

With these new laser  cutters they have these days the things would be a walk in the park.  A place I used to deal with did cardboard mats and you could literally draw a design on a bit of paper, they could scale it to any finished size you wanted up to 1x2m  and cut the hole perfectly. Whole process took minutes. It would even do thin sheet metal. that was at least 10 years back now so I bet these things are easy to get and much cheaper to buy now.
Perfect for gasket making

I much rather have one of those than a 3D printer. 

I have seen some real high performance engines that have head gasket issues where they now machine in a ring at the top of the bore and put in a Crush copper O ring.  No more blown gaskets..... Up to a point where the bolts stretch or the head cracks or warps!

cobbadog

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Re: How best to set up a Lister A
« Reply #17 on: May 07, 2019, 07:00:47 AM »
Yes, one of those cutters would be good but it would take me the rest of my life to learn how to drive it. It was exhaust manifold gaskets only that I had trouble with all others I have no trouble even bought a circle cutter to help with the bigger size circles so I haven't bought a gasket set for many years.
When rebuilding the David Brown TVO engine which is a wet sleeve job I had to establish what size copper gasket was fitted under the lip of the liner so that the liner sat the correct distance above the block for the correct compression of the copper head gasket. The options were either 0.005" or 0.013" and I was able to measure the correct one.
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mikenash

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Re: How best to set up a Lister A
« Reply #18 on: May 07, 2019, 08:09:00 AM »
FWIW on several old stationary-type engines I have fitted (28mm?) Solex VW carbs - two of them on re-purposed Bedford engines, for example.  They are wonderfully simple carbs with an easily-removed main jet for mixture changes.  With the accelerator pump blocked off & vacuum shit disconnected they're a good donor for anything that runs at constant revs with a simple linkage movement.  I have just made intake tracts out of exhaust bends