Author Topic: Lister D Banjo Bolt Size(s)  (Read 371 times)

perthlisterfan

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Lister D Banjo Bolt Size(s)
« on: March 06, 2019, 11:39:25 AM »
Hello all,
I have come across an interesting issue when trying to find a replacement banjo bolt for my Lister D carburettor. The carburettors on my two Lister D carburettors use a banjo bolt with a 16 tpi / 55 deg thread and have a thread OD of 9/16". A replacement banjo bolt I got from the UK has a 19 tpi / 55 deg thread and an OG of 1/2"
My carburettors AMAL float bowl has an ID of 5/8" where the banjo bolt goes through the fuel transfer ring.
The UK banjo bolt only has an OD of 1/2" where it fits into the AMAL float bowl.

So my question is. When did Lister change the size of the inside diameter of the AMAL float bowl connection rings and the banjo bolts? Did they supply the Australian market with a different specification carby/float bowl?
Looking forward to your knowledge.
Cheers
 

cobbadog

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Re: Lister D Banjo Bolt Size(s)
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2019, 02:30:34 AM »
Have you contacted the seller to see if he had the correct thread size?
Coopernook - the centre of our Universe.

ajaffa1

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Re: Lister D Banjo Bolt Size(s)
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2019, 09:06:29 AM »
Hi Perthlisterfan, I`m pretty sure the banjo bolt you describe is a BSF thread (British Standard Fine). I suspect that what you have received is probably a UNF banjo bolt. What you require should be available from the UK. If not please get in touch and I will turn you a couple on the lathe.

Bob

perthlisterfan

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Re: Lister D Banjo Bolt Size(s)
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2019, 12:03:58 PM »
I measured up my banjo bolt that fits my carburettor and it does appear to be BSF 9/16" as its major diameter is 0.56 inches diameter and has 16 TPI thread.
I think the one from the UK looks to be BSP (BSPP) as it has a major diameter of 0.518 inches and has 19 TPI thread.


ajaffa1

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Re: Lister D Banjo Bolt Size(s)
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2019, 12:41:23 PM »
Hi Perthlisterfan, so we agree on what it is that you need, no point buggering about trying to identify what you have been sent. Do you have dimensions from the original? I would recommend going to your local Land Rover dealership, all old land rovers had oil pumps, coolers and etc that were connected using 9/16" BSF fittings.

Bob

mikenash

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Re: Lister D Banjo Bolt Size(s)
« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2019, 10:46:23 PM »
FWIW I have bought Banjo & Doughty fittings from the hydraulic guys recently - Hydraulink, Dewtec, etc.  Cheers

perthlisterfan

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Re: Lister D Banjo Bolt Size(s)
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2019, 08:43:43 AM »
Bob and Mikenash,
Thanks for the heads up as to where to get 9/16" BSF banjo fittings, and thanks for putting up with my dumb questions. I'm afraid that I grew up in the metric era, I'm not a mechanic and have never had anything to do with a Land Rover. That's why restoring this old stuff intrigues me. I get to learn new stuff.
Cheers
Richard

ajaffa1

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Re: Lister D Banjo Bolt Size(s)
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2019, 10:17:12 AM »
Hi Richard, welcome to the learning curve. Old machinery was designed and built using the British imperial scale of feet and inches still used in the USA. It works on a base 12 system which can be divided by 2,3,4 and 6. Unlike the metric 10 based system which can only be divided by 2 and 5.  The beauty of the old system was that engineers and builders could do the maths in their heads, while to work in base 10 you need computers and calculators. So much for progress, we now have a system that no one can do in their heads consequently we are reliant on technology and have to pay through the nose for it! If you can learn you 12 times table and count to one thousand everything in imperial measurements makes perfect sense.

Good luck, enjoy the learning curve.

Bob