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Author Topic: Southern Cross ETB diesel engine  (Read 2597 times)

sirpedrosa

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Re: Southern Cross ETB diesel engine
« Reply #15 on: February 24, 2019, 04:05:55 PM »
Hi Bob

that's it Bob, nothing like having a "carcass", always on hand so the brain has to do it - a good old machine to do a "peeling".

And negotiations with "She" to drive, is only a necessary evil for a greater good. I'm in your page... she call's basement the "office", and other things "I don't remember".

Last thursday I asked for transportation assistance from a friend (82 years) to my 12/2 block, to lay it down in my parents' place, and along the way people asked the reason I wanted that engine (they see it as scrap). The only answer I could muster was that it was to preserve some history of the village.

I promised them that engine will show his smoke...

Cheers.
VP
Bernard 18A - 1968 (mama's water pump - year of my birth)
Petter PAZ1 - Jun 1967, 3HP, sn 416xxxx

ajaffa1

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Re: Southern Cross ETB diesel engine
« Reply #16 on: February 24, 2019, 09:59:03 PM »
Well done Pedrosa for being the person in your village who cares about your history and heritage. Once you have it restored and on show, the local people will stand and stare in awe at the simplicity and beauty of this old engine. They will also be ashamed and wonder why they never thought to preserve such a wonderful item themselves.

Now that you have got it home you get the joy of cleaning 60 or more years of crap out of it. When I did mine I got so dirty my wife would not let me in the house. I had to strip off all my clothes outside!

Good luck, have fun.

Bob

glort

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Re: Southern Cross ETB diesel engine
« Reply #17 on: February 25, 2019, 12:09:17 AM »

 When I did mine I got so dirty my wife would not let me in the house. I had to strip off all my clothes outside!

This seems a new and abnormal concept to you Bob.
I used to do it as a matter of habit and still have recently.  At the old place we had a shower in the laundry I could enter from out the back. Here I have to come into the house to get to any shower. I get in trouble for leaving dirt and bits of plants on the carpet even when I am stripped butt naked.
There is now a cake of soap next to the back tap as I have also been banned from washing hands and face in the laundry tubs and making them dirty.

I have already been reminded there is plumbing up the shed for a shower and a toilet and We should look at setting up a bathroom up there so I don't have to walk through the house and make the inside showers dirty when I wash off.
Thinking maybe I should just put a kitchenette up there as well and move the spare bed in the shed into the new area and be done with it!  :-\

ajaffa1

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Re: Southern Cross ETB diesel engine
« Reply #18 on: February 25, 2019, 06:38:20 AM »
Hi Glort, having grown up and spent most of my life in the UK I learned that taking ones clothes off outside was a bad idea, not because we Brits are shy or prudish but because it is too bloody cold!  :laugh:

Bob

EdDee

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Re: Southern Cross ETB diesel engine
« Reply #19 on: February 25, 2019, 07:52:10 AM »
Having 13 acres of man cave plain, a rule has come about: If you don't like what you see, look away...

Walking butt naked from the front yard through the house to my room to shower has happened before... Not because I am going to get shat out for leaving a trail of oil/grease/debris, but because I am the one that has to clean it up... One of the very few disadvantages of being a bachelor.... On occasion, particularly hot weather, the tenants bring me a beer while I am waist deep in grease and grime, closely followed by "Why don't you go have a nice cool shower...I'll clean up after you...." That usually means there are friends over, they bribe me with a frosty to avoid shocked looks from the visitors... ;D ;D ;D

Lol
Ed
12/1 750RPM/9HP Roid 5kVA- WMO Disposal/Electricity & Hot Water Gen
12/1 650RPM/8HP Roid 4.5kVa - Demon Dino
Chinese Yanmar - Silent Runner with AutoStart
Classic Komatsu 1963 Dozer/Fergusson 35 Gold Belly ...
Bikes,Cars,Gunsmithing & Paintball...Oh yes, a 5Ha open air Workshop to play in!

ajaffa1

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Re: Southern Cross ETB diesel engine
« Reply #20 on: February 25, 2019, 08:08:26 AM »
Hi Guys. I have been wondering how Butch manages to insert images in between his text rather than at the end. There is a button on the post screen called "Insert Image" it has a very small picture of the Mona Lisa on it. When I click on this icon it places IMG text on the post but does not tell me how to insert the image. I am guessing that the attachments and other options button is used to insert the first image up to 4 per post. Anyone know how this works?

Bob

ajaffa1

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Re: Southern Cross ETB diesel engine
« Reply #21 on: February 25, 2019, 08:26:34 AM »
Hi Ed, I very much doubt I will be able to persuade the Wife to do the "clearing up after me while I have a shower" bit. If we have guests and I am dirty I just get banished to the shed until they leave. In the past some of the guys have come down to my shed to see what is going on, it`s usually more interesting than the conversation the Ladies are having. One cold refreshment leads to another (all quality home brewed beers), before you know it all the men are in the shed drunk as skunks and all the Ladies are furious with us for our bad behavior. No wonder we don`t have many visitors these days.  :laugh:

Bob

ajaffa1

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Re: Southern Cross ETB diesel engine
« Reply #22 on: February 28, 2019, 10:13:07 AM »
Hi Guys, sorry it has taken me so long to post an update. Even when I was a young man, I was never the quickest worker. Now I am old and buggered up things take forever. That said I have completed the tear down of my ETB engine. Not an easy task for a man who can`t pull on a spanner, every nut and bolt involves beating the spanner with a rubber mallet!  >:(

While this rebuild will take me months I will post some photos as I go.

My first impression of the engine was that a 2.5 HP four stroke diesel engine is rather pointless, my push mower has a 6 HP petrol engine! I have changed my opinion, I can see how a farmer in the 1950`s might want a small cheap and reliable engine to run a small irrigation pump or charge battery storage, it could also have been use for driving conveyor belts or even cooling fans.

I am astonished at the build quality, that a small foundry in rural New South Wales could produce such good castings and then machine them so well in 1950 is extraordinary. Where did they get the foundry men and machinists from, who put up the capital for what must have been state of the art production equipment back then.

A few early observations are that this engine has a duplex drive chain to run the camshaft and a simplex drive chain to drive the oil pump. The crank shaft and all bearings are pressure fed with only the cam followers and open camshaft bearings being splash lubricated. Very advanced for an agricultural engine that must have been designed in the 1940`s.

While I have cleaned and primed the outside of the crank case, I am in two minds about painting the inside. This engine was built in 1955, so, working on the basis that the original owner was lazy and only changed the oil every year, this engine has had 50 plus changes and that should have flushed out any casting sand and other detritus. It has been degreased and pressure washed, there is some rust which I have mechanically removed, should I treat it or not?

Anyway a few photos to keep your interest.

Bob

glort

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Re: Southern Cross ETB diesel engine
« Reply #23 on: February 28, 2019, 12:43:32 PM »

You sure have brought it up nice already Bob. Looks good just in undercoat!
I have no doubt it will look better than new when you are finished.

The chain drive sure is a long way from todays engines.  New engines like Briggs & shitten have PLASTIC cam hears and blower vanes on the flywheel.
Always have been garbage IMHO.
I wouldn't be worried about sand. Thing is not made in Rajakot and what sand if there was any in the first place isn't going to do much now.

I think you are doing well with it. I have no physical problems but I struggle every day to things just to overcome what's in my head.

Your observation about the limited power is interesting. I have been looking at a few things lately like guys putting 6 HP motors in cars and small tractors and through gearing they can do work you just wouldn't credit. Sure they may not break the speed limit in a school zone but you can do a lot with a little power if you are in no rush and gear the power you have Correctly.

I was out using my little plough today readying a garden bed for the winter crops.  8 Hp motor I run at a fast idle and the only way the thing stops is if some thing breaks.  Sure it moves slower than walking pace but if you had it driving something that weighed 2 ton and was on tracks, it would go through brick houses.

Have you any idea what you want to do with it when completed?  I could bring you up a 12V 80A self reg alternator if you wanted to make a battery charger out of it.  The alts have serpentine Pulleys but I could bring you a larger one to drive it with but I have found the 7 rib serpentine's drive pretty well with a B series V pullly.  I doubt 2.5 Hp would drive the alt to full amps but even  50A is one hell of a battery charger and a little engine like this would be economical to run all day when a battery/ bank is tailing off and you can only trickle charge the thing anyway.
My Roid is flat out pulling 2 of these alts at max throttle but they would still make good power with 2.5 Hp input I reckon.

I think back in the day everything worked on low power because people weren't in such a hurry for one thing and economy was an even more important factor that it is today. Also things tended to be over built and under stressed back then where as now days things are pushed hard and built as light as possible. When your engine was built it was intended to still be going now, when a new engine is built today they know exactly how many hours the thing should run and not an hour longer. Instead of repair, rebuild and re use, now it's simply throw away and buy new.
You don't put plastic gears in anything you really want to last a long reliable life.

Coupled to an inverter, I reckon you'd get at least 500W from an engine like this driving an alt. Probably quite a lot back in it's day when most light bulbs were  25 and 40W.
Even more now when LED's are 4 and 6W  :0)

Johndoh

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Re: Southern Cross ETB diesel engine
« Reply #24 on: February 28, 2019, 10:27:12 PM »
Did you have much trouble taking out the head bolt?
It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness

ajaffa1

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Re: Southern Cross ETB diesel engine
« Reply #25 on: February 28, 2019, 11:01:41 PM »
Hi Guys, I was expecting terrible trouble with that corroded cylinder head stud but I think that the thing was so wasted that it had stretched and was loose. All the bolt are UNC or UNF, the head studs are UNC into the block and UNF at the head end. I`ll probably have to make replacements. I only broke one stud during disassembly (timing gear cover) fortunately there was enough stud left protruding to get a wrench on it. The engine came with one stud that had sheared off below the surface of the crankcase, I drilled it and got it out with an easyout, happy days!  :)

This engine  is intended to run at around 1500 RPM but the power take off is from the camshaft which will only be running at 750 RPM so Glort`s idea of running a car or truck alternator to charge a battery bank looks like a good one, just got to get the gearing right. I think that I will probably make a small trolley for this engine, it is small enough to easily take to a show.

I have tracked down a man in Toowoomba, where these were originally made, he has a limited supply of spare parts including an injector and pump, saves me the trouble of trying to source suitable alternatives from Bosch.

Anyway it`s time for me to go and get dirty again, got to get as much done as I can before the end of the month when I am having the first of two surgeries on my hands. I`ll post more this evening.

Bob

dieselspanner

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Re: Southern Cross ETB diesel engine
« Reply #26 on: March 01, 2019, 07:02:44 AM »
Well done with the easy out, takes a level of calm and skill I struggle to attain!

Best of luck with the hands.
Stef
Tighten 'til it strips, weld nut to chassis, peen stud, adjust with angle grinder.

ajaffa1

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Re: Southern Cross ETB diesel engine
« Reply #27 on: March 01, 2019, 09:42:12 AM »
Thanks Stef, I am just like you, I hate having to use Easy outs, there is nothing easy about them! They generally work well if you have a steel bolt in a steel or cast iron hole where you can apply a little heat to loosen things up. They are completely useless in the case of a steal bolt in an aluminium castings where they usually just strip the thread out. I remember many years ago having exactly that scenario and deciding to drill out the damaged hole before taping a thread into it, I then made a threaded aluminium stud which I screwed into the hole, this was cut off flush with the face of the casting. My intention was to drill and tap a new hole into the now filled hole, so to secure the aluminium stud in place I got out the TIG welder. Big mistake, turned out the casting was magnesium alloy and I nearly burned the shop down, took two buckets of sand to extinguish the flames and I couldn`t see properly for days!  :laugh:

Not too worried about the surgery, it`s supposed to release pressure on the nerves. If it works then I will have no further deterioration and might even recover some of what I have lost. If it doesn`t work then I am f*cked, but since I am already f*cked it doesn`t much matter. I believe the recovery time is about a month and then I have to go for more physiotherapy. Not looking forward to having to sit and do nothing again, there is only so much Judge Judy and Dr Phil that a man can watch without going mad!  :laugh: Unfortunately as soon as I recover from the first surgery they are going to schedule the second surgery on the other hand,. This will be followed by another round of daytime television and physiotherapy. I can only assume that this is my punishment for being a horrible c*nt in a previous life.

Bob

ajaffa1

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Re: Southern Cross ETB diesel engine
« Reply #28 on: March 01, 2019, 10:58:46 AM »
Well Guys, I got good and dirty again and managed to strip and free up the seized oil pump, this is a very nice little unit with spring loaded impeller vanes, it has some surface pitting but should be OK.  I also had a lot of fun with the oil strainer which was solid with a mixture of dirt, rust and solidified sump oil, it has been soaking in a vat of petrol for a week, hitting it with a pressure washer has cleared out the last of the crap . Both are now clean and functional and have been fitted to the crankcase.

I also had a go at cleaning up the camshaft, it also has some rust pitting but I think I can polish out most of this with some very fine wet and dry paper or flour paper.

Photos attached,
Bob

ajaffa1

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Re: Southern Cross ETB diesel engine
« Reply #29 on: March 07, 2019, 10:24:05 AM »
Hi Guys, Yesterday I managed to get the crankshaft back in the ETB. It has some rust pitting on it most of which I have polished out. I did consider having it reground but having measured the journals I found the main bearings to be only a half a thou under size while the big end shows only one thou of wear. I do not plan to put this engine to work, instead I plan to get it to running condition and then take it to a couple of shows, it will probably run for less than a dozen hours a year. While I would have liked to rebuild this to as new condition I cannot justify the expense, so it is just going to be a toy, I very much doubt that the small amount of rust pitting will be a problem with those sorts of running hours.

The main bearing bushes are solid brass units with a white metal coating and are in remarkably good condition. I spent most of yesterday messing around making gaskets out of various sized material until I got the crankshaft end float down to five thou, the manual states a minimum of two thou but gives no maximum, I think five should be fine.

Today I refitted the camshaft with new bearings, the originals had corroded solid. I could not get open bearings as per the originals and had to pay for sealed bearings and dig out the seals, I also flushed out all the grease as these are going to be splash lubricated with sump oil inside the crankcase.

Tomorrow I am hoping to get the timing chain back on but I have come up against an interesting problem, the manual states that with the crankshaft at top dead center, the two timing marks on the drive sprockets need to be in line. The problem is that there are three marks on the crankshaft sprocket and two on the camshaft sprocket. Fortunately I took a lot of photos during disassembly and should be able to work it out.

Anyhow I`ve posted a few picture to give you all something to look at.

Bob