Author Topic: Another shop project  (Read 1167 times)

38ac

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Re: Another shop project
« Reply #15 on: January 18, 2019, 01:38:32 PM »
Here is the hot bulb fuel is injected here where it steams and then is ignited by compression


The outside of the hot bulb , the fuel injector mounts to the flange closest to you and the starting carburetor mounts to the angled flange.


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38ac

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Re: Another shop project
« Reply #16 on: January 18, 2019, 01:50:55 PM »
The starting carburetor, lots going on with it besides mixing gasoline and air.  At the bottom there is a handle that operates a valve that either isolates the carburetor from the hot bulb or connects it. Above it is the mixture valve and above that is the reservoir  for gasoline. The spring to the right is on the valve stem for the atmospheric intake valve. Not seen in this view but between the mounting  flange and spring is the spark plug hole. I will expond on this later  if there is interest  as it is easier understood when mounted.

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BruceM

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Re: Another shop project
« Reply #17 on: January 18, 2019, 03:34:39 PM »
The size and weight of these parts is amazing.  Thanks for showing the hot bulb details.

38ac

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Re: Another shop project
« Reply #18 on: January 18, 2019, 06:26:34 PM »
Previous owner lost most of the hardware. Making up some heavy pattern whitworth nuts.
Starting out with hex bar saves a bunch of work


The OEM nuts appear to have been made by apprentices so I tried to duplicate them.




They are the mounting nuts for the magneto bracket,  cant be seen but I know they are there and correct ;) the lever on the bracket shifts the collar back on the shaft so it misses the lever on the mag when not needed.
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ajaffa1

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Re: Another shop project
« Reply #19 on: January 18, 2019, 09:17:43 PM »
Fascinating, the weight of the components is frightening, this was built to last unlike most of the crap available today. I noticed that the big end bearing cap has castellated nuts, can the bearing clearance be adjusted with shims?

How in hell did they transport something this big back then? The logistics of trying to move this from the factory in Grantham UK to a port then load it on a ship to the USA, unload it and then transport it to it`s final destination terrify me. Imagine trying to unload this off a horse drawn cart with a block and tackle. It would be easy nowadays with mobile cranes and forklift trucks but back then? Wow!

Thank you so much for sharing this with us, please don`t give yourself a hernia.

Bob

38ac

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Re: Another shop project
« Reply #20 on: January 19, 2019, 12:45:31 PM »
Bob ,
There is a surprisingly large  amount of documentation about how they were moved about and assembled. My information tells me that  this size engine is about the largest that was shipped in one piece unless it was sold local to the factory.  With the empire  being what it was back then large engines were hauled to and assembled some very remote and difficult installations. Luckily some of the men that performed the task were also fluent  writers and also took photos.  I dont have any links saved but will spend some time looking soon.
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38ac

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Re: Another shop project
« Reply #21 on: January 19, 2019, 06:52:45 PM »
Some easy work today,  cleaned up and mounted the oilers. One for the big end lubrication one for the piston. The mains  each have their own oil sump and other points are manually attended to.  Manual says 9 drops per minute for the big end, 6 for the piston another lesson for those who think that things must be submerged in oil to be lubricated.
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ajaffa1

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Re: Another shop project
« Reply #22 on: January 19, 2019, 09:20:38 PM »
Looks like you are making great progress, first smoke can`t be far off. I can see how the piston would be well lubricated with that drip feed system but what about the little end bearing (wrist pin), is that one of the areas that need to be manually lubricated? Might be very hazardous to do while the engine is running.

Bob

38ac

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Re: Another shop project
« Reply #23 on: January 19, 2019, 10:41:14 PM »
There is a rather elaborate system of channels on the top of the piston that gather oil and send it to the wrist pin bushings. Most of the manual oiling points are far enough away from harms way. Remeber it was built prior to the age of general mechanical stupidity and the always somebody elses  fault movement.
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dieselspanner

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Re: Another shop project
« Reply #24 on: January 20, 2019, 07:40:45 AM »
Looking good, Butch, thanks very much for taking the time to post all the small details and the general information too.

The ingenuity of Victorian engineers was almost beyond belief, after all, they weer the ones who did everything first.

Check this out, the first of several 'knock down kit' boats on Lake Titicaca.....

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yavari_(ship)

Cheers
Stef
Tighten 'til it strips, weld nut to chassis, peen stud, adjust with angle grinder.

ajaffa1

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Re: Another shop project
« Reply #25 on: January 20, 2019, 08:02:55 AM »
Thanks Butch, I can just about visualize how that lubrication system could work.

How did we get to this mechanical illiteracy in only one generation? When I was growing up, I learned from my Dad. When I was old enough to drive a car, I bought service manuals and learned everything I could about the vehicles I owned. I serviced them myself and discussed any issues with local mechanics in the local pub. Weekends were spent cleaning, polishing and servicing, what do young people do nowadays?

I will never understand how the western world, with all it`s skills and technological superiority, have allowed it`s people to be seduced by the cheap, throwaway crap from China and India. Thank god for people like yourself, who keep the flag flying for quality products and high engineering standards.

Bob

 

ajaffa1

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Re: Another shop project
« Reply #26 on: January 20, 2019, 08:14:35 AM »
Hi Stef, I was wondering about how they transported Butch`s engine from the UK to the USA. The idea of building an entire ship as a kit that could be hauled by donkeys and then reassembled is mind blowing. I guess that is the definition of an engineer, identify the problems and then find a way to overcome them. I take my hat off to them.

Bob

dieselspanner

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Re: Another shop project
« Reply #27 on: January 20, 2019, 09:30:54 AM »
Hold on there. Bob!

I suspect that there's still a lot of 'engineers' out there, someone has to make the machines that make the 'Chinese crap'!

Given a choice between working on a farm, in a foundry or down a coal mine, a career sat in a nice warm office with a keyboard and a mouse, working with technology you grew up with, don't seem too bad an option, add in the lack of mashed fingers - or worse - and then scrubbing the dirt off at the end of the shift..........

We only repaired those Mini's, Cortinta's, etc. and the rest of them 'cos we were skint, and they were somewhere near the forward edge of engineering, at the time.

In much the same way there's guys out there today that can change the battery on an IPhone 5 or whatever, on the kitchen table.

Think about the vast increase in reliability in small cars from the time of our youth. In 50 years time, when electronic equipment goes that far up the scale of dependability, there's bound to be another generation, on a forum like this, bemoaning the lack of mechanical skills in the young and their complete reliance on the domestic robot to change light bulbs and toilet rolls.

Butch making Whitworth nuts and you and Bruce buggering about with generators, mosfets and soldering irons, will be on the same plane as bodgers, blacksmiths, wheelwrights. and the other 'generalist' engineers. Glort, veg oil and solar panels won't be in it either.

Well, unless the apocalypses we suspect is coming, actually arrives, then I hope that bloke in the kitchen has downloaded this forums WOK onto his steam powered tablet! 

Rant over, I'm off up the shed to change the exhaust on the Landy, before tomorrows snow storm sets in!

Cheers
Stef
Tighten 'til it strips, weld nut to chassis, peen stud, adjust with angle grinder.

glort

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Re: Another shop project
« Reply #28 on: January 20, 2019, 11:45:26 AM »


Thank god for people like yourself, who keep the flag flying for quality products and high engineering standards.


Here here!

I frequently feel embarrassed at how little I know about things especially in the company of the caliber of people here.
The thing is, many of my friends and people I know think of me as some genius Mr. fixit.

As Bob says, the ability of people to be self sufficient has gone out the window.
There are many angles to that.  When looking for houses 18 months back, to find one with a shed garage that you could put the car in and anything more than a lawn mower and a folding picnic chair was far and few between.  There just isn't room for any tools in most newer, 20 years  or less places.

The other thing is the professional status of people.  Brother in law round the corner is entirely useless with anything DIY.  He tells me all the time, his greatest and all purpose tool is his chequebook.  As he says, he earns more an hour than the people he pays so it's not economical for him to do it.  I have found a few things like that myself lately and I'm certainly not pulling down what he does. Sometimes by the time you pay the costs you have to yourself you can pay a bit more and get some monkey to do it for you or cheaper as i have found on occasion.

Yesterday I amazed some friends that came over for a BBQ.  One of the old ceiling fans on the back verandah had carked it so we went and bought some new ones and replaced them.... all by myself.... and didn't call a tradie.... or die in the process.
Yep, undid 2 bolt head screws, undid 3 wires, put up a new bracket with the screws, sat the assembly on after I attached the blades, reconnected the wires, Changed the wall plate.... Miracle!
First thing one mate said when Mrs mentioned we bought them that morning and they looked good was where did we find an electrician to come on a weekend???  Say what???   :o

I don't feel smart or clever, I feel embarrassed I can't do a lot more but mostly I feel a bit sad and worried that other people are so much more useless than I am. I have never known any "father Figure" who c ouldn't do this stuff for themselves.
Dad was always repairing cars when I was a kid for extra money and what little he couldn't do around the house someone in the family or a friend could. Grandad had a thing against trades people and likewise my father in law had never come across a problem he couldn't fix including Moving his own house back on the block and completely renovating it.

So many other people however are hard pressed doing much past changing a light bulb and if you look that up on the net there will be endless saftey sissys telling you it's a job fr professionals but if you are going to attempt it yourself, make sure you are wearing PPE and have someone watching you at a safe distance with teh paramedics on speed dial just in case the only possible scenario of such wreck less behavior happens and you electrocute yourself.

There are still some young people getting their hands Dirty thankfully and as I always used to tell my son, the tradies are going to be the future wealthy because everyone else regardless if they earn $10M a year down will not be able to do without them and there will always be a shortage of practical hand's on people.

Sorry for the diversion, just brought back a lot of thoughts and memories after spending the day (again) planning out renovations here and what i'm going to have to do.

I wish there were people I could learn from to do things like this. If I ever came across anyone they would have an unpaid apprentice for the rest of their lives... or a week till they told me to piss off and stop asking so many goddam questions.  :embarassed:




LowGear

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Re: Another shop project
« Reply #29 on: January 20, 2019, 01:04:05 PM »
This grasshopper is truly impressed.
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