Author Topic: Winter in Northern California  (Read 802 times)

glort

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Re: Winter in Northern California
« Reply #15 on: January 05, 2019, 08:28:50 PM »


I think you did well with your new 300W panels. Last time I looked I -might- be able to pick some up for $200 ea but not sure of quality.
Yes or regs are stupid and clearly designed to keep an industry ticking over. Al lot of systems get removed to add larger ones. They make it so that is cheaper/ more viable.  If you add to an existing system you miss out on the tax credits which are substantial so people take off older perfectly working systems and put on complete new ones. So much for the enviro benefits but hey, money has to come first.

The green flavour of the month here atm is batteries.  Everyone though advertising hype seems to think if they spend 10 or $15K on a battery they will be saving money. Some think they will save the environment and some think that spending  $15K so they have power for a couple of 90 min blackouts every years makes some sort of sense.

You should be designing power systems for space stations and critical off grid applications with your knowledge and skills in this area. 
Seems to me like power has gone the way of the internet.  Once you hard coded everything with a site to make sure it was as lean and fast loading as possible.  Now there is so much superfluous code in everything it's a nightmare.  Often so many " packages" that do 10 things even if you only need one but all the code is still there blowing out the download size for no reason at all other to make fast connections slower than what they could be.

The aerobic Septics are HIGHLY preffered here now. Due to whingers going on about contamination of the environment, septic pit systems are almost outlawed unless you have 1000 acres in the middle of the outback  50 KM from a river. The Biocycle type are also highly regulated the same way... inspected.  Mate who lives further out had to put in a new system after he collapsed his septic pit. Running 20 Ton back hoes carrying 3 ton rocks will tend to do that. He is on 20 acres and the amount of rules and regulations he had to jump though was unreal.  He dug the hole himself and the council wanted the company putting in the unit to certify the hole Met specifications.
Only specification would be the thing fit.  Was a $30K exercise doing most of the work himself which was probably a $10K saving.

Excatly like you said, he got a load of attitude and veiled threats from the inspector for Commissioning the thing before the guy had passed it. He had the company come ut and to all the initial setup ready for it to be inspected but then as his septic was no longer working and things were backing up, he did the final connection and started using it.  the inspector took a Month to get out there and mate asked what he was supposed to do in the mean time? Reply was should have hired a porta Loo.
Yeah right.  threats were made to fine him for using without permission. Suggestions were made about counter suing council for breaching state laws of inspections having to be done within 3 days of request date.  Charitable inspector conceded that as the system was properly commissioned and mate had all certificates and work signed off on bar his final approval " He'd let it slide this time." 
Mate was not intending to put the things in on a regular basis!

The only servicing these systems really need is Chlorine tablets in between the second to last chambers. These have to be topped up about every 3 Months.  had a guy servicing mine but after a couple of times where he broke stuff, I didn't continue the contract and manage it on my own..... which is allowable if you get the costly inspections... which I and the guy next door don't.  I did get a mates son who works for the water board to get a sample of my water tested earlier in the year and it was spot on so once we get over this setback I'm sure it will be again.... now the majority of incompatible cleaners have been removed.

The solids also need removal every 5 years or so and I get the feeling mine is about due. That's a fortune to have done when it's no more than filling the chambers with water and then Pumping out the solids with a regular holding tank pumper the same as people in the street here get every week. I'll do mine gradually to get the levels down as I can dispose of the sediment that is removed.  The top of the tank is concrete and has access ports for putting Pickups into the chambers for the job.



BruceM

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Re: Winter in Northern California
« Reply #16 on: January 05, 2019, 08:58:48 PM »
i sure woudn't want my anaerobic system leachate perking into a shallow water table or area where there is surface water.  No worries of either here in the high desert. If I was building again I'd look into aerobic systems like yours...and i'm impressed that you are even finding appropriate use for the resulting sludge.   


glort

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Re: Winter in Northern California
« Reply #17 on: January 05, 2019, 11:30:08 PM »
i sure woudn't want my anaerobic system leachate perking into a shallow water table or area where there is surface water.

From what I have looked up and had confirmed by testing, the output of these systems is pretty benign. My mates son said of the sample I gave him " I wouldn't like to drink it but there is no Biological reason you couldn't. "  He also went on to say that it was better than a lot of the samples he gathered from natural watercourses for various reasons of contamination.  His job is largely going Bush into various areas especially around water catchment areas and taking samples for testing and then investigating sources of contamination if found. He does basic tests in the field and then they go to the lab for more through examination.


Quote
...and i'm impressed that you are even finding appropriate use for the resulting sludge.

I'm just cheap!

There are conflicting rules here.  In some states the water is allowed to be used on Fruit and veg and in other states it is not. It seems more of a regulation issue than a biological one. I tend to avoid using the tank water for anything that we may eat. That's only a small bit of the garden so I use the tank water for that as I believe the lack of chlorination may help the plants thrive as well. That said, the Chlorine in the bio water doesn't hurt anything, the stuff is like vegetation Dynamite but they do say the resulting chlorine levels are lower than that of tap water.

 I have loads of hedging on my borders plus a lot of decorative garden area I have just dug up and removed a lot of trees and plants from. The soil here contrasts from heavy clay to sand that has difficulty taking water.  I'm not about to do a Chinese market garden and put the Sludge on any fruit or veg areas but for the hedges and where I want to now grow grass, should be great.
Given the size of the tank and the amount I estimate in the bottom, I can't see there being more than 1000l, probably closer to 500 at best  in settled form.  I think I'll be pulling that out and wishing there was more to go further.

I might also get my Natural Fertiliser mix from the local equine park and cover the sludge with that then plough it in.   The horse manure with the straw and shavings they have for bedding or floor covering makes a good blend.  I put this through my garden Chipper which blends it up and turns it into coarse powder which is easy to spread and breaks down easily unlike the turds in raw form that can sit on the top of the soil and not break down for a year after they go hard no matter how much water they subsequently get.   

I'm surprised there is ever any of this stuff to be had and everyone with a garden round here, of which there would be thousands, isn't  picking the pile clean.
Guy next door got some from a nearby race track which I was going to do. He freaked and said don't touch it. Apparently he and the guy over the road went and filled his truck some years ago. He said the stuff was full of plastic syringe caps, a few needles and ampules.
He said obviously what they were dosing the horses came through and he reckoned it was 2 years before his garden came back good after he took off the top layer of soil and replaced it.  Guy over the road had the same problem. Rather than fertilize things, killed them.
he said he paid a lot to have his soil tested again before he was game to eat anything out of it.

Pitty, they will load it with a Bobcat for you which would save a lot of effort but as the guy next door said, with all the farms and gardens around, there is a reason why they have 30 Ft high piles of the stuff and have trouble getting rid of it.

I have to admit, embarrassingly, since coming here I have become a lot more environmentally Conscious. Of my own environment that is.
My old place was on a main road and the amount of rubbish that used to blow in, even in the back yard, was depressing.  I bought a yard Vac when I first went there and running the place initially as a business I used to go out ever day or 2 Trying to clean up the bags, papers, cans, drink bottles and even bits of clothing.

Eventually I gave up to once a week or so when I mowed the lawn. When doing something myself, I'd just drop small pieces of stuff and not worry thinking either I or the rain will wash it away eventually down the long concrete Driveway.  Stuff would hang around but nothing like what blew in.

Here I Strip a piece of wire and will pick up every last bit of insulation and piece of tape... whatever. I'm particularly conscious of plastic because that never goes away.... Although the sacks I bought a while back to put the manure in lasted about 3 weeks in the sun and disintegrated much to my annoyance.  I have a Vac here for the leaves when they cover the place when they fall in Autumn but use it for cleaning my own things too.  If I know I'll be doing something in a particular area, I'll vac it and put all the plant material on the garden, do the job and then Vac again and put everything I get in the bin. At least that way I can just drop the bits and pieces as I go and then not have to worry where they will end up.

Feel guilty now for what I did before but in the big picture was the very minor problem from all the rubbish that did come in there.
Often if I'd move a trailer that had been sitting for 3 months or so at the back of the driveway, I could half fill a bin with the accumulated papers and crap that gathered up underneath and then fused together with some dirt and water.  Here my Biggest problem is trying to clean the gutters once a week from the accumulated leaves. Time for the big tree to get a haircut.

The dust there was bad as well. Very bad.  It was black which meant it was all soot and probably brake and clutch dust seeing we were just up from a busy set of lights.  You could dust the place and a matter of hours later barley looked like it had been done in a week.  That did always worry me for the effects on our health. Maybe we will be better off now, I tend to think after 20 years the damage would be done however.

I'm surprised how dusty it is here too. Thing is it's brown dust so I tend to think if anything we are breathing dirt. There are no main roads round here  for 5km and even then they are nothing like the one that was out the front of the last place. That road was one of the Busiest arterial roads in Sydney and had thousands Vehicles an hour.  I also notice that the prevailing winds are from the west here which  is nothing but bush and farms .... forever Virtually. The city is in front of us a long way off and all the air we get is the country air from inland.  I'm sure we are breathing much better air now.  The prevailing wind at the last place was from the road towards us so we copped the lot.  Always makes me laugh when people talk about car exhaust. Not the exhaust I think needs to be worried about, it's all the clutch and brake dust which is full of asbestos and lord knows what else along with rubber dust.

Particles are always far more damaging than diluted gasses.

BruceM

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Re: Winter in Northern California
« Reply #18 on: January 06, 2019, 01:10:02 AM »
I think spending $15K on batteries might be OK if they last 40 years but is otherwise impractical.  My set is $1000. and lasts 4.5 years. Designing for low power pays off big, and forever.  When the sky rains gold coins in my yard I'll upgrade to AGM batteries.


mikenash

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Re: Winter in Northern California
« Reply #19 on: January 06, 2019, 02:19:03 AM »
The human excrement component of household waste to the septic system is not problematic at all

It's the other stuff:

The grey goop from the "in-sink-erator" type of waste disposal

The alkaline-and-fat-heavy waste from the dishwasher

The vast volumes of "grey" water from washing machines & showers that dilute the poos-and-water mix in the septic system

The household cleaners, bleaches, shampoos, oven-cleaner residues - all that stuff

I have worked on drainage systems for over four decades and watched them develop in complexity as residential sections have become smaller and the burden of water and aggressive chemicals become larger

It doesn't have to be that way:  Once the inspector has gone there's nothing to stop you bypassing the system for the "water" from showers, dishwashers, washing machines - just attach it to a hose and let it water the grass somewhere . . .

I have lived on rural small-holdings all my life and can tell you, hand on heart, that if all you put into your septic tank is shit, water, urine & toilet paper (and don't use chemicals to "clean" the toilet bowl, or run the water from the small wash-hand-basin into the toilet line to  the septic tank) then you can have a simple, single-chamber, old-fashioned septic tank AND it won't need to be cleaned out for 20 or 30 years

I have seen the insides of dozens of them where old houses had toilets only into the septic tank and "grey water" through a fat-trap and sediment-trap system and then out to soakage.  The "solids" in the septic tank build from the bottom up, the "floaters" sit on the top and are very soon full of worms.  It can take 30 years for the solids to work upwards and the floaters to work downwards until there's only about 100mm of vertical space in between them - and the tank STILL works fine

What comes out into the soakage is a nutrient-rich liquid that is very low in volume as it's basically only a dozen or so toilet-flushes per day - maybe 100 litres?  All you need if a few metres of soakage & some flax bushes for transpiration

Shit isn't a problem

Chemicals that kill the bacteria in your tank are a problem

(That, and Council's insistence that everything must pass through the "septic tank" system including shower & laundry water you could probably drink if you were stupid enough to)

In my own, un-permitted property I have what is effectively a hole-in-the-ground downstream of each of the two toilets. The soil is very free-draining and the water from a flush drains away in seconds.  All that's left is shit and paper and worms.  Each hole is the size of a Mini.  I guess it might take 100 years to fill either of them up?  The grey water just goes to keep some grass green

Excuse the rant  :(

glort

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Re: Winter in Northern California
« Reply #20 on: January 06, 2019, 12:47:37 PM »

It was a very informative and interesting rant if thats what you want to call it.

I would have thought that the " cleaner" water would have been helpful. Apparently not.
If all my plumbing wasn't set into a slab and then under a concrete verandah all the way to the tank, I'd direct the grey water straight to the yard as you say. Only thing I could access is the laundry water and that i don't think would be all that much of our normal use.

 As it is I have 2 IBC tanks I put the effluent from the biocycle in untill they are near full. I then water the garden or lawn with this. Garden gets priority.  Most people pump it straight to the lawn but I feel it's too valuable a resource just for that especially  with the extremely dry weather we have had till the last month.
 I like to save up a decent amount so I can go out and water and know what I have done and how much I have put in to any part of the garden.

We don't have an insinkerator or a dishwasher and I did ban all bleaches from the place. Mrs is now aware only to use "septic Safe" marked products which aren't a problem getting round here as so many people have these systems.
I guess this is another case of bad design with these things .

The councils do have a policy as you describe here are are pretty Draconian on every stupid part of it.  Mate had to go out and get purple hose and Purple Coloured sprinkler heads as the Bio guys warned him it would not get passed.... even with the exact same sprinkler type he was using in shiny gal instead of the purple.  As he said, Building his 25x15M shed involved less regulations and inspections than putting in the shitter.


BruceM

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Re: Winter in Northern California
« Reply #21 on: January 06, 2019, 01:13:34 PM »
Certainly a lot more should be done with gray water systems, especially in water poor arid areas.  I had a lot on my plate when designing a home for off grid but did research gray water systems.  The trick is to keep them dead simple and not try to store it or they quickly turn into a nasty maintenance headache;  stored gray water quickly turns black and smelly, and pumps need filters.  Because of the slope of the land and my desire to locate the house in a hollow between two hills for reduced microwave levels I had limited options for gray water use by gravity alone.  Likewise the septic is downhill in the direction of view so using a Watson wick

https://permaculturenews.org/2017/11/14/watson-wick-flush-toilet-system/

 was not viable.  I have some old hippy friends who went that way 30 years ago and it has worked very well for them for a nice growth of fruit trees.

I really had no use for the sink and shower water in the house as downhill (N) of the house is the view of huge rock outcroppings so was a poor location for trees.  I was able to use the laundry and roof gutter water for the house and shop/utility building to water two Siberian elms located between and just below the house and shop.  This allowed me to use a much cheaper top loader washer and not be concerned about water "waste".  The trees get nothing else since the first year and have done fabulously well.  I use a relatively benign ''natural'' laundry detergent and no bleach.  I've found that just eliminating the washer is a huge burden off the septic, as the rapid pumping of 25 or so gallons of water to drain the washer causes stirring of the solids tank and too many fine solids spilling into the leachfield.  Likewise fast backwashing filters i have always put into separate drywells. 

It would be nice to have more shade trees near the house but without the dreaded graywater tank, filter and lift pump there was just no way to make that work for my site in an inspection friendly manner for a slab on grade home.    If I had been designing for a large family, I might have attempted it.  Building a superinsulated house as a -55 dBm shield room for radio/microwaves and a no latex paint interior was about all the challenge I could manage on my limited budget and sweat equity plan.
 
http://www.eiwellspring.org/emc/HighlyShieldedHouse.htm

The figures listed are for dBm, a measurement of decibles of milliwatts of radiated power, though they are listed as dB.  The measurement of radiated power is often listed in decibels of volts, such as dB mV/m.  This is double the power reading, so -55dBm worth of shielding is equivalent to -110 dB volts.  This is an extraordinary amount of shielding for a home, higher than any other home in the world at this time.  It's more than I need at present, at around -80dBm (absolute) I can sleep and function well.  The ambient levels near the house are around -63 dBm presently, and -52 dBm in other areas from two towers at 5.5 miles.  The shielding added about $10K in labor and materials cost.








glort

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Re: Winter in Northern California
« Reply #22 on: January 07, 2019, 08:01:35 AM »

Parts arrived and repaired my air pump for the septic this afternoon. nice simple and straightforward job that only took about 10 min.  They are just glorified Fish tank Pumps.

Thing was blowing up a storm but didn't do much when I reconnected it to the tank. Heard one chamber bubbling but there are another 2-3 that are not. I have a feeling the sludge is blocking them.  I'll bring down the air compressor tomorrow and  give the lines a higher pressure blow out.  Thinking about it as I type. Cant see any reason I couldn't give them a shot with the garden hose.  then again, electrical box is inches away so air might be better.

Looks like I'm going to be needing some PVC pipe to connect to a hose on the fire pump and suck this stuff out sooner rather than later. 
Hopefully I can get away with blowing out the air line for the time being and the pump will keep them clear till I can have more ...fun... playing in the shit tank.   :(

Going to get one of those grey water hoses for the washing machine next time I go to the hardware.  There is a garden few meters outside the laundry door so will have to go on a Wife/ daughter educatio9n program. I can see one laundry flood before they  learn and ensuing argument s  but.... If she does not want a stinking shit tank, sacrifices have to be made.

I actually wanted to put some edible crops in that garden, Guess now I can!

mikenash

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Re: Winter in Northern California
« Reply #23 on: January 07, 2019, 08:37:27 AM »
Shower water is a good candidate too - especially if one has teenage daughters - as there is so much of it.  If the shower waste comes through the wall in a 40mm or 32mm pvc pipe & elbow to a gully trap it's easy to divert, depending on elevation above a lawn or garden . . .

glort

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Re: Winter in Northern California
« Reply #24 on: January 07, 2019, 09:43:17 AM »

I went pipe checking today.
As I suspected it's all through the slab and under the concrete verandah.  NFI what we'd do is a pipe became blocked but I think it would involve a jackhammer.

How do these things cope with hair? Does that dissolve or just Build up in the tank? Mrs has always had long hair and it ends up everywhere, particularly in the shower. She moults like a persian cat, always has. I'm wondering if that is going to cause problems down the track?

Mentioned the grey water hose to the Mrs and also as expected, got grief over that.  Told her if the effing thing stinks, don't blame me. Told her I had spoken to an expert about it but she insists it was fine when we got here.... with 2 old people that were on holidays half the time anyway.  You can tell some people but........

I told her I'll clear the air pipes, throw some actizyme in it and the rest is up to her because that's all that can be done.

Only time I notice any odour is when I lift the lid on the thing briefly but she reckons she can catch wiffs of it when she is out the back.  I wonder how much is real and how much is imagined?

ajaffa1

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Re: Winter in Northern California
« Reply #25 on: January 07, 2019, 11:51:46 AM »
Hi Glort, I too live on a property with a septic tank. The very first thing I did when I moved here was to divert gray water from showers, basins and sinks away from the septic tank. That grey water now keeps the grass green.

The biggest problem with our septic system is that the soak away meets the regulations regarding the rate of fall from the tank. Consequently, in a storm event the water flowing through the paddock, will back fill the septic tank. We then get bad smells until the ground dries out and the soak away starts working again. I have seen it so bad that raw sewage is running down the hill into the creek, but this is Australia where the rules out way good practice and common sense.

Where we live is the water catchment area for Grafton and Coffs Harbour, so the council are for ever sending out inspectors to check our sewerage arrangements. They can`t get to where I live when there has been heavy rain so they have no idea how much sh1t gets washed into the rivers and gets drunk by the residents down stream. I could never understand why it was OK for cattle, pigs, chickens, kangaroos, dogs and etc to sh1t in the catchment area but human waste had to be treated. I recently had a conversation with a local Ranger who told me that the inspector is n`t interested in my septic tank, he just wants an opportunity to come on my property and have a look for any improvements I may have made which would allow the council to jack up my council tax!  Sounds about right to me, I`ve been illegally using grey water for six or seven years and the inspector has never noticed, too busy taking photos of my house and shed to inspect anything.

About 30 Km from here there is a small town called Coutts Crossing, there is a water purification plant which feeds Grafton and also a sewerage treatment plant.  After heavy rainfall events, these facilities are under many meters of water, the sewage and drinking water wash out into the local river and run out to sea. Once the flood water resides they quickly start pumping drinking water to Grafton, despite the fact that it is contaminated with the river water and the effluent from the sewage plant. As far as I am aware we have never had any outbreaks of cholera, typhoid or other water born infections.

Next time that I get a letter telling me the council would like to inspect my sewerage facilities, I might just lock the gate and tell the useless snooping b*stards to go f*ck themselves.

Rant over,
Bob

BruceM

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Re: Winter in Northern California
« Reply #26 on: January 07, 2019, 03:51:21 PM »
That sure is an interesting approach to water treatment, Bob.  Chlorine is used to cover a lot of sins, but it's hard to imagine that there isn't a serious public health cost to such incompetence.

I found one local small town water supply that had been dripping motor oil into the deep well and pump to lubricate, but the EPA inspector told them no petro oil, it causes colon cancer. They had a 50 gallon barrel feeding the drip. They switched to white mineral oil; no one told them that white mineral oil is the same.

Humans baffle me.



glort

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Re: Winter in Northern California
« Reply #27 on: January 07, 2019, 11:21:19 PM »

Bit like when my father moved his wrecking yard to his home.

Not one single thing about any concern for oil and grease dropping into the ground or being washed into the creek and river, all they were concerned and gave him grief about was the increased traffic flow on the road.

He pointed out he was a wrecking yard not a Kmart and had to have someone come sit at the gate of the other place for 3 days recording how many vehicle movements there were.
Not long after he moved everything to home, they put a crematorium down the end of the road and did no improvements to it what so ever.  There are hundreds of cars going up and down now yet they were worried he might have 5-10 on a good day and he lives less than 1 KM from the corner where the cemetery is right down the end 4km away.

He's pedantic about oil and fluids going into the ground and you can see there never has been any by the grass growing everywhere but was just ridiculous they should have no concern for this what so ever.  I go into yards here in the city and the ground is that contaminated the dirt is like concrete.  They wreck cars in the yard and all the fluids go on the ground and they just have no concern what so ever for it.

They talk a lot of tight regulations but certain foreign groups whom are prevalent in the industry either threaten the inspectors or feign not understanding and they get away with it. Same thng happens in the building industry. That's why we have a tower block completed 4 Months ago starting to crack up and all the residents have been evacuated. Probably be a common thing in 10 years time.

In a lot of european countries they MUST use Veg oil based lubricants in their chainsaws. This started with bar oil but I believe now they are pushing for the 2 stroke fuel component as well. The veg is natural and breaks down where as the mineral oil is just a contaminant.

I know the council my wife works for Bob uses google earth and Six maps to look at streets and check for illegal constructions , tree removal, unapproved swimming pools etc.  Apparently the council next across does this as well most aggressively. My mate has already come up against it.  He cleared land for his shed before he put in the DA.  Someone turned up about it carrying the before and after pics.  I was surprised they had info so up to date but apparently they can do imaging much more regularly than the public sees. He has been working on removing all teh smaller trees under the canopy now so the density does not get worse and then he can over time drop the bigger ones and say they died or got blown over in a storm.

Luckily by the time the inspector came the DA had been approved so he got away with a finger waving. Where he is is nothing but bush till you hit the other side of Australia but they are tree pedantic.

They also wanted him to locate his new Bio in a natural wash area where it turns into a creek when it rains. You can see it's a natural water course when there is no water but that is where they insisted it go.  Unfortunately mate hit rock only a meter down and had to come back 5 meters to get past it.  There are a LOT of sandstone formations in the area which can be tens of meters wide and almost flat. Great for building a house or shed on, not so great for tanks. One side of the pit was solid rock which he wasn't un happy about.
Had he put the tank where they insisted, he said it would have been a toss up between it getting full of run off water and the shit washing into the creek below or the whole thing popping up like a cork and washing into the creek.

ajaffa1

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Re: Winter in Northern California
« Reply #28 on: January 07, 2019, 11:57:59 PM »
Hi Glort, when I was working in the UK construction industry we used to fit glass fiber septic tanks made by a company called Klargester (see photo). These were set in the ground and then surrounded with concrete, the trick was to fill them with water BEFORE back filling with concrete. I saw one crew forget this step and the tank launched itself out of the ground like a ballistic missile, still makes me laugh just thinking about it.

Bob

glort

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Re: Winter in Northern California
« Reply #29 on: January 08, 2019, 02:42:35 AM »

Yes Bob, I have read many warnings of this. Much is made of filling the tanks before sucking the sludge as well.
I'll be sure to turn the pump off and let the last Chamber full which is normally near empty for counderweight then do one of the other chambers at a time and fill that before doing the next one. I'll also fill the 2 IBC's  So I have a good amount of water available rapidly so I don't have to wait forever to fill with a hose  and I have water to wash the sludge around and thin it out if I need to.


I Just blew out the air lines with the compressor. Seemed to take a lot of pressure to do that.  Give it a few runs at 50-80 PSI and seems to have cleared everything out. Air coming up now where I have never seen it before so either I broke something ( unlikely) or cleared outlets that haven't been working since I got here. That would not surprise me.

I'll chuck some Enzyme pellets down all the drains and see how we go. Hopefully no more problems for a good while.
I'll keep an eye out for a cheap spares kit for the air pump as well. I was surprised how easy and hassle free that job was.