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Author Topic: Anyone know what this is?  (Read 331 times)

ajaffa1

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Anyone know what this is?
« on: August 30, 2018, 09:53:11 AM »
Found this on Gumtree in Australia. For anyone wanting to power a small town she

ajaffa1

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Re: Anyone know what this is?
« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2018, 09:56:19 AM »
Sorry, computer sh1t itself half way through typing. Anyone wanting to power a large village or small town would be happy with one of these:https://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/somerville/farming-equipment/lister-90-kva-generator/1193731503

What would it cost to rebuild and what would it be worth after?

Bob

ajaffa1

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Re: Anyone know what this is?
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2018, 10:01:14 AM »

glort

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Re: Anyone know what this is?
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2018, 12:52:39 PM »

I reckon youd make good money on that thing even if you just scrapped it.
Engine may be cactus but the genny could probably be repaired.

I see the same guy also has another big unit in running condition for sale. perfect for the man on the land who has always dreamed of running their own power company.

The big gennys always seem much better value per KW $ than the smaller ones. Spose there is a limited market for them. I see a lot with very low hours as they have been emergency units in buildings and only ever fired for their monthly test run.  I think they have to replace them anyway after a good number of years regardless of how little work they have done.

ajaffa1

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Re: Anyone know what this is?
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2018, 01:28:58 PM »
Hey Glort, your probably right, scrap the engine and sell on the Dunlite head.

The best value in generators always come out of hospitals and etc where they have been back up to critical systems. Monthly maintenance and no work, a lot of them even have heating systems built in so the oil and etc are at working temperature the moment they kick in.

The only worry is that the bores may have a bit of glazing due to low load testing, easily cured by a long run under heavy load.

Bob

glort

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Re: Anyone know what this is?
« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2018, 02:05:13 PM »

Have seen the ones that were heated.  Quite warm too. Can only think of the amount of energy pumped into those things over the years sitting there.

I always thought the load testing was flat out. I played High rise babysitting ( Building Manager)  for a while for a couple of places in town. The tests for the back up gennys and the fire Pumps were wide open from the first hit and stay like that for up to an hour while the output was monitored.  Spose different tests for different applications.... or the guys doing the tests on the engines where I was were just hoping to bring on a failure to sell the building owners a new setup!   :laugh:

My mate is  state manager for an IT backup company. They have a place in Brisbane that has a couple of V12 backup gennys. Again, have to be up to speed and carrying full load in 10 sec after being initiated.  I forget the output but it's massive.  they have enough fuel on site to run the things full tilt for 72 hours.  They are in teh basement and he said when they fire them for testing and bring in the trailer mounted Dummy loads, the whole building vibrates and hums.  Given each engine alone is the size of a car, I can see why.

Hate to think what those things will cost to replace!

ajaffa1

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Re: Anyone know what this is?
« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2018, 02:39:39 PM »
Hey Buddy, the protocols for testing back up power vary enormously from one jurisdiction to another and from state to state and country to country. In some areas just checking that it fires up and runs is adequate, while in other areas it is mandatory to have a full dummy load. Hospitals have regular runs on full back up generator power but these are often cancelled due to emergencies and patient requirements.
 
You wouldn`t want to be the victim of an RTA, be taken to hospital on life support only to find that half way through surgery some maintenance engineer decided to test the back up generator and it tripped out.

Hence a lot of systems don`t fire up as and when they should. Always blamed on maintenance never on management and overloaded public services.

Bob

glort

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Re: Anyone know what this is?
« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2018, 05:22:48 PM »

The IT place where my mate is has a full battery back up as well.
I forget the exact time but from memory it was good to supply the place full power for 7 Min.  Just needs to be there so there is no interruption between the power going off and getting one of the gennys up and firing.  If the first one fails, the second one is supposed to kick in with in 2 Min I think it was.

The UPS is there to make sure that the place is never without power as their whole business  is holding and backing up the data for major corporations and Businesses.  Loss of a minutes data or being off line could cost them fortunes.

I bet their battery bank would run your place and mine at full tilt for a week and still not be too deeply Discharged.

BruceM

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Re: Anyone know what this is?
« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2018, 06:09:46 PM »
The global power requirements for data centers just keeps rising.  From Forbes:

U.S. data centers use more than 90 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity a year, requiring roughly 34 giant (500-megawatt) coal-powered plants. Global data centers used roughly 416 terawatts (4.16 x 1014 watts) (or about 3% of the total electricity) last year, nearly 40% more than the entire United Kingdom.Dec 15, 2017