Puppeteer

Author Topic: ld1 sl1 startomatic control panel parts  (Read 576 times)

martin chaplin

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
    • View Profile
ld1 sl1 startomatic control panel parts
« on: March 05, 2018, 02:26:38 PM »
hi I'm looking for startomatic control panel components or complete box I have one but cant seem to find any internal components any help where I might get replacement parts would be very much appreciated thanks martinchaplin@gmail.com

ajaffa1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 788
    • View Profile
Re: ld1 sl1 startomatic control panel parts
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2018, 03:24:16 AM »
Hi Martin, parts are hard to come by. You don`t say in your post how complete or otherwise your control panel is.
Sleeman & Hawken in the UK have some parts listed on their eBay site at http://stores.ebay.co.uk/Lister-Petter-Parts. There are about sixty pages to scroll through but they do have some relays, original rectifiers, capacitors and start switches listed. No doubt they have other items in stock if you were to contact them. The prices might shock you. Dieselgman might also have some parts.

If your control panel is largely complete but not functioning, then most of it can be repaired. I had to rewind the relay coils on my Start-o-Matic. I also replaced all the rectifiers with modern diodes. My control panel also has a small circuit board that was fried. I managed to source replacement semiconductors from a company called the little diode company in the UK. Many hours with a soldering iron later and it all works.
Good luck,
Bob

BruceM

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2312
    • View Profile
Re: ld1 sl1 startomatic control panel parts
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2018, 03:58:53 AM »
Gorgeous restoration of the SOM electrical system, Bob!  Very professional job.

ajaffa1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 788
    • View Profile
Re: ld1 sl1 startomatic control panel parts
« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2018, 05:59:07 AM »
Thanks Bruce, not sure I could do it again had to use a magnifying glass for some of the soldering. Eyes aren`t what they were.
Found a neat trick for working out the correct resistance on the damaged relay coils. Weigh them before dismantling, wind on the new copper wire until they weigh the same and your probably within a couple of per cent of the original.
Bob

glort

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2301
    • View Profile
Re: ld1 sl1 startomatic control panel parts
« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2018, 08:10:42 AM »

That is Impressive.  I can do OK with wiring but the layout and keeping it neat and tidy is something I don't seem to be able to achieve.

Looking at everything in that box, I wonder how much more simplified it could be made with something like an arduino or other modern devices?
If they could make those things work then, ought to be a piece of cake now.

That said, Imagine what a thing that was in the day! No need to go and start the genny all the time, Flick a switch, wait a few sec and you are there.
It must have been like magic because to me, it's still pretty impressive.  A modern version now might be to have some battery's, even if not great in capacity running through an inverter and the genny kicking in once the batteries dropped voltage.  A light for 10 Min might be OK where as if you turned on something more powerful, The thing would Come on instantly and the genny would come on almost straight away as well. If you had a solar feed as well, you may be able to save a lot on battery's.

ajaffa1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 788
    • View Profile
Re: ld1 sl1 startomatic control panel parts
« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2018, 08:44:50 AM »
Too right, I believe that solar power with battery back up is the way forward. The problem is the cost of storage, so a system that allows you to watch TV, use a computer, run a fridge and have the lights on should run well off a solar charged battery bank with an invertor at a reasonable cost. The problem comes when you want to run an electric cooker or AC unit after dark. You either need to spend a sh1t load of money on storage or have a startomatic which will kick in to fill the gap. How to wire this is beyond me but I`m sure some clever SOB has it figured out.
Bob

dieselspanner

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 462
    • View Profile
Re: ld1 sl1 startomatic control panel parts
« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2018, 12:20:24 PM »
Ok, I get the convenience of 'Startomatic' but surely a remote 'watchkeeping' panel in the kitchen, or somewhere, wouldn't be too much of a come down?

A simple curcuit with a glow plug in place of the COV, on a timer before the starter kicked in, a solenoid on a timer to close the rack for shut down and a couple of extra gaskets under the cylinder to lower the compression ratio a bit would be enough.

An over temp. and a 'no volts from the alternator' shut down via the same solenoid would be about all thats required for the safety of the engine, if you wanted to avoid an overnight run, after a few cans, you could add a timer to shut down after 2/3 hours or whatever.

You'd still have to go down the shed to check the oil and fuel levels, so you don't loose the legit excuse to hide from SWMBO for half an hour or so each evening.

Having just swapped the motor in an '80's Land Rover I've got a flywheel and a starter motor spare, the OD of the flywheel is an inch or so larger than the pulley of the alternator on my 6/1 CS and I've scourced a 'weld in' taper lock bush for the 1 1/2" alternator shaft.

Hopefully in a couple of weeks or so I'll have time to lash it all together, the machining and welding is being done by a mate of the local shepherds, for whom I've sorted out a petrol genny that has had lots of of it's plumbing and wiring eaten by mice over the winter, so we're running on 'Mountain Time' here!

After that I'll think of something else.......

Cheers Stef
Tighten 'til it strips, weld nut to chassis, peen stud, adjust with angle grinder.

BruceM

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2312
    • View Profile
Re: ld1 sl1 startomatic control panel parts
« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2018, 05:53:38 PM »
I think I've still got the only computerized, remote start/run Listeroid but there must be another out there somewhere. Mine uses Bimba type small air cylinders for rack closer and exhaust valve lifter, and a Gast 4am air motor for a starter with a rubber friction drive wheel.  Oil level, temperature, rpm and vibration are all monitored while running.

All the sequencing and timing is a piece of cake with these Ardunios or other controller chips with flash memory.  Mine uses the British Picaxe chip- which is a family of standard Microchip PIC processors running a Basic interpreter.  It requires no support circuitry- just power it and add a 3 pin header for serial programming. Today the Arduino Mega family would be the ticket. 

There's a learning curve for the programming of these little single chip computer beasties, though I think in the world today it's well worth learning.  I went with the Picaxe because 20 years after a serious toxic brain injury I wanted something simple enough for kiddies.  I was impressed, though I did have a great deal of difficulty with learning to program again.  Basic had been my first programming language and is a lot less cryptic than C.  I did force myself to use C for my Arduino based inverter project, but I would prefer a structured Basic, Pascal or Ada.  C was intended for operating system routines, interrupt handlers and device drivers but it's a comedy as a high level language and is part to blame for the buggy software products we all suffer with.  There is an annual competition to write a small program in C that no one can figure out what it does...it's ideally suited for that. That said it is a very capable language for embedded controllers.

One thing that is a bit disappointing in the Arduino shields and related hardware is the absence of an expansion board with loads of low side mosfets and perhaps some high side P-channels for solid state switching of solenoid valves, etc.  It seems most are just doing small things and are content with a few relays.  I was also rather shocked to find fundamental bugs in things like 32 bit integer multiply by a 16 bit integer resulting in only a 16bit value stuffed in the 32 bit result!  I guess open source compilers aren't quite all they are cracked up to be though I did like the price. :)

I'd be happy to provide some tech assistance for someone else doing their own modern SOM.