Author Topic: Project Roid  (Read 3513 times)

BruceM

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Re: Project Roid
« Reply #45 on: April 03, 2018, 03:20:57 AM »
A marvelous display setup.  Loved the pnematic cylinder driven wheel.  Thanks for sharing your video!

2Ton46

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Re: Project Roid
« Reply #46 on: April 07, 2018, 02:56:43 AM »
You're welcome. That little pneumatic engine has provided way more fun than the 3 hours it took to make. In fact, I think I'm going to paint it so it looks pretty. I might even consider making another one. The C-channel steel used to make it is so rusty you can see through it in places, hopefully it doesn't fall apart too soon.  It garnered a lot of comments last weekend at the party. It might not be a very efficient use of power, but its quite interesting to watch and will chuff happily along at about 65 rpm with a very pleasing rhythm. The wacky wavy arm-flailing inflatable tube man and his fan was a gift from a friend and is very much appreciated and is also pretty fun to watch.

2Ton46

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Re: Project Roid
« Reply #47 on: May 05, 2018, 01:11:39 PM »
Made the whole mess a little easier to get in and out of the barn. It now doubles as a train!? This way I only have to make one trip to get it all in. Also built a rack on the back of the engine cart for the driveshafts. Takes about 5 minutes to setup for operation.



My brother hosted a party at his place just down the road last weekend with a bunch of folks he works with, and it was a warm and wind still day. Perfect for the yard fan I said. Pulled the train down the road, set everything up and fenced it off to keep em out of the moving bits. The setup was a hit, everyone loved the fan and the noise level still allows for conversations.

2Ton46

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Re: Project Roid
« Reply #48 on: July 04, 2018, 08:11:02 PM »
Figured I'd share a clip of the setup I had in the yard this past weekend for our annual barbecue. Finally remembered to grab a clip just before I took it all down and headed for the barn after the event was over and cleanup was nearly complete. We have a string of 105 lights around most of the yard that it was powering during the event, as well as working the yard fan in front of a mister and animating the tube man and the air engine. On the day of the event she cranked up at 4:55 am, ran the whole works until noon when we stopped it to address the crowd for a minute and top up the fuel tank. She then ran until a little after 10:00 pm when the last of us decided to move indoors.

https://youtu.be/GxIs-YR-e2E 

2Ton46

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Re: Project Roid
« Reply #49 on: August 13, 2018, 03:24:49 AM »
With all the recent governor spring activity on the forum, I thought I would give a sneak peek at my latest part of the project that is now in the needs to be cleaned up and painted phase. Since I have found a spring solution that gave me a much better speed regulation I decided to tackle something I had planned from the initial start of the project, but never did implement because with the original spring the regulation was all over the place. I have found over the past 6 months that depending on the loads I have connected and even the ground I have the unit parked on (sometimes it still likes to vibrate excessively at certain speeds/loads/ground hardness) I need to tweak the speed set point to suit the conditions for the day. So I decided to fab up a variable speed control for the engine.  This way I can fine tune the speed set point without needing to get out some tools to move the spring hook.  I have also returned to one spring, instead of the two in series as I had been experimenting with.  The response is just slightly less aggressive, but its still a huge improvement over what I had with the old spring and perfectly acceptable for the uses I have. I used some parts I had around and so its a little over built in some areas, but its functional.  The mechanism is calibrated to give a speed range of about 475-675 rpm on the engine, over about 30 turns of the crank handle to give a fine tuning control, but keep it from being able to be carelessly taken far out of the safe operating range.