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Author Topic: Identify this Bamford?  (Read 3296 times)

basewindow

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Re: Identify this Bamford?
« Reply #30 on: December 19, 2018, 10:53:55 PM »
Video link to youtube.

https://youtu.be/hUJXb6-WZt4

Takes 3 attempts to start.

Then a quick view running.

Thoughts?

Cheers,
Cam.
1953 CS Lister 3.5hp, 1938? Bamford SD1 3.5hp, 1962 Fordson Super Dexta, 1969 International 434.

basewindow

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Re: Identify this Bamford?
« Reply #31 on: February 02, 2019, 10:19:54 AM »

Pretty much the last update on the BAMFORD SD1 3.5HP. Seems the starting issues are beginning to resolve themselves as time goes on. Also seems there is a bit if technique involved with the first start. Maybe I'm just used to the relatively easy start of the Lister CS. Overall I'm pretty happy with the result. A couple of before and after pics. Thanks all for you help and suggestions,.


 
1953 CS Lister 3.5hp, 1938? Bamford SD1 3.5hp, 1962 Fordson Super Dexta, 1969 International 434.

mikenash

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Re: Identify this Bamford?
« Reply #32 on: February 02, 2019, 06:04:06 PM »
Looks really good Cam - a great bit of work!

BruceM

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Re: Identify this Bamford?
« Reply #33 on: February 02, 2019, 06:09:17 PM »
She looks great,  I have a fondness for Bamfords since 38ac did a project engine for the forum.

38ac

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Re: Identify this Bamford?
« Reply #34 on: February 02, 2019, 10:15:57 PM »
 Yup, looking great. I'd love to have an SD type.
Collector and horder of about anything diesel

glort

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Re: Identify this Bamford?
« Reply #35 on: February 03, 2019, 01:24:46 AM »

Thoughts?

Looks like you did a brilliant job on it . Really nice with all the original stickers as well.

I wonder if you are priming the thing before you start it too much or too little.  I have found with a lot of engines there is a sweet spot on them.

I was having trouble getting a new 2 stroke Brushcutter started. I pride myself on setting up 2 strokes to start first pull but this one had me about ready to pulverize it.  Set the carb a heap of times and it ran perfect but starting was more frustrating than I could stand.  Turns out the thing does not want any priming with the swueze bulb and one pull with the choke on and the next with it off and it fires right up.

All of my diesels start very easy but I have come across those that can virtually flood and then have very hard starts.

I'd experiment with the priming and don't pay too much attention to any manufacturers instructions. They have lead me well astray.

basewindow

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Re: Identify this Bamford?
« Reply #36 on: February 04, 2019, 08:30:13 PM »
Yes, in the video, I was priming it quite a bit, and as you say I think too much.  Seems now I just prime it so I can heard the injector creak, also the oiling cup, needs to be primed to get some oil down into it (Somehow when I had the head off and was cleaning it up, I missed this and it was blocked), then once cranking it needs a few more turns after the decompression lever is dropped. You can feel it wanting to start and if you give it a few more turns to help it along it will now normally start first or second time. Once its started the first time for the day, its usually pretty easy after that. As you say, seems just to be a matter of working out the best procedure and technique for yours and generally disregard whats in the manual.
From what I have read the Bamford SD are notoriously difficult starters.
The decals I got from Rally Badges Online. Was looking for some for the Lister CS originally,  thinking there would be nothing for the Bamford, but sure enough, they had some. From what I can tell it looks pretty original.
1953 CS Lister 3.5hp, 1938? Bamford SD1 3.5hp, 1962 Fordson Super Dexta, 1969 International 434.

glort

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Re: Identify this Bamford?
« Reply #37 on: February 04, 2019, 11:28:07 PM »

 Once its started the first time for the day, its usually pretty easy after that.

I have know a few exactly the same.
Had a Mercedes running on veg oil and that first start was a night mare.  You could drive it 10 min, leave it 12 hours, come back and it would fire up without fuss.  A few times when I had to be places I'd start it before I went to bed and then again during the night.  Fired in the morning OK then.

Tried everything to fix the problem thinking the fuel must be draining back to the tank or something but the only thing that got around it was  Throwing some Methanol/ Meth spirits down the inlet then firing it.

BruceM

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Re: Identify this Bamford?
« Reply #38 on: February 05, 2019, 03:34:00 AM »
On the MB 300D engine, the valve clearances and timing are reportedly critical to good starting in cold weather.  I wasn't convinced until my cold starting improved dramatically after putting in an offset key to compensate for chain stretch, and re-timing the IP.  I need to adjust the valves again, I've got one cylinder that's no catching when it's cold.

I'm not sure how veggie oil might affect that, but since it's fussy on dino...


glort

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Re: Identify this Bamford?
« Reply #39 on: February 05, 2019, 07:13:54 AM »

I was always on top of the valve clearances.
made a hell of a difference to the way they ran.  I remember doing a mates valves and I couldn't figure how the thing ran. They were that far out I was thinking the ajuster was broken or something. Just when I was about to give up after about a dozen checks they came good.

Other thing was the throttle linkages. on this car he was getting about 50% throttle. I told him they were out but he was adamant that was how they were from the factory.  He went to get his kid from school and I did them while he was gone and said nothing.  When he came back and took it for a drive  he didn't get 6 houses down the street and said to me, You did the linkages Didn't you? I said yes. Time we came back he said the thing has never gone like that before.  Wonder why?

People made a big fun of doing the valves but I got some cheap spanners, ground them down and bent them and even welded handles on them and had no trouble.

Retiming the thing with the chain stretch and the IP timing would make a big difference. So many little things adding up as they get older.
Another guy I knew rebuilt this one he had. Wasn't a turbo but geez it went like one. this thing had grunt unlike any other OM617 I have ever been in.

I would like to find another 300D in decent nick and turbo it.

BruceM

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Re: Identify this Bamford?
« Reply #40 on: February 05, 2019, 08:57:38 AM »
Almost all the 300D's stateside US are turbo'd. I didn't do it, but cranking up the turbo boost pressure and defeating the over pressure valve is supposed to have the go like a scalded cat, till the engine burns up if you don't back off.  Without the turbo at 5600ft it's pedal to the floor at all times unless stopping, dog. 

I got my hands on one that had a virgin ALDA, the altitude IP adjust.  Over time the baro bellows get weak and the mix gets too lean at altitude.   Popped the factory plastic seal and riched up the fuel mixture till it would leave a little black in the exhaust if you flat out stomped on it. That sure is a performance changer. 

They are getting hard to find in good condition these days.  I've got my '85 300D driver and a parts car with a good tranny and a bad injection pump.  Every year it loses a few more bits. 



« Last Edit: February 05, 2019, 07:33:04 PM by BruceM »