Puppeteer

Author Topic: How are you pre-heating your WVO before the injector  (Read 9682 times)

veggie

  • Keep Calm and Start the Lister !
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 293
    • View Profile
How are you pre-heating your WVO before the injector
« on: September 26, 2013, 03:15:46 AM »
Hi Everyone,

This is for my GM90 Listeroid:

I now have my WVO fuel tank mounted and the fuel supply lines are divided by a 3-way ball valve close to the Injector Pump.
I am ready to set up my VO pre-heating system and I would like to know what systems have worked for many of us members.
In my inventory I have some 30" long ni-chrome heating wires (120 vac).
I also have a small plate heat exchanger which I could tie into the coolant lines for a supply of 180f heat if needed.
My initial plan was to just heat the injector line with the heating wire an see how that worked.

How are you doing it ?
Suggestions welcome.

cheers,
veggie
- 6/1 GM90 Listeroid - Delco 33si Alternator
- Changfa R175 - ST2 Generator
- Kubota Z482

bschwartz

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 321
    • View Profile
Re: How are you pre-heating your WVO before the injector
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2013, 04:30:30 AM »
Veggie,
I ran my listeroid 6/1 for several years with a nichrome injection line heater like you are suggesting, and preheating the oil by wrapping the supply line (from the tank to the selector valve) around the exhaust.  http://listerenginegallery.com/main.php?g2_itemId=6626
I had the head off several times over the years for leaking head gaskets (original type) until I started using the gaskets-to-go type.
Each time I had the head off, I never saw significant carbon buildup, so I'll call my heating method successful.
-Brett

1982 300SD, 1995 Suburban 6.5, 1994 F250, R170, Metro 6/ sold :( , Witte CD-12 ..... What else can I run on WVO?

jfgalaup

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Re: How are you pre-heating your WVO before the injector
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2013, 07:19:14 AM »
Veggie,
I ran my listeroid 6/1 for several years with a nichrome injection line heater like you are suggesting, and preheating the oil by wrapping the supply line (from the tank to the selector valve) around the exhaust.  http://listerenginegallery.com/main.php?g2_itemId=6626
I had the head off several times over the years for leaking head gaskets (original type) until I started using the gaskets-to-go type.
Each time I had the head off, I never saw significant carbon buildup, so I'll call my heating method successful.

Hello,

I use VWO with non pre-heated fuel line.
I added only kerosene (1/5 of volume).
I beginn running the 6/1 (Vidhata) with diesel. After 5 minutes, via a by-pass, the Listeroid run well with mixture VWO (4/5) and kerosene (1/5).
10 minutes before shutting down (at full load), I closed the mixture-line and the Listeroid run only with diesel.
That procedure allow a cold-start without pre-heating in any weather and in any circumstance (but I'm living in Tahiti... French Polynesia, near Bora Bora).

Best regards.

jfgalaup
« Last Edit: September 28, 2013, 07:26:56 AM by jfgalaup »

listeroil

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 164
    • View Profile
Re: How are you pre-heating your WVO before the injector
« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2013, 04:23:11 PM »
Veggie

I use no form of preheating at all. I use liquid WVO and start and stop my engine on it. I have fitted a thermostat in the water system to get the engine up to temperature quick and keep it there. I am not sure if I could hand crank the engine to start on WVO. I have a SOM with electric start and sometimes it does take a bit of cranking.

Mick

tyssniffen

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 89
    • View Profile
Re: How are you pre-heating your WVO before the injector
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2018, 04:57:19 AM »
this is an old thread, but I'll throw in here.   

I do exactly what jfgalaup does, I run my WVO along an extended exhaust pipe, in an aluminium tube for good heat transfer.  I have the exhaust and tube wrapped together.

what I wanted to see if I could get a reply about was the comment about 'not seeing much carbon build up'...  I have a TON of carbon build up when I run WVO... could it be that I'm simply not getting my WVO hot enough??

glort

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1205
    • View Profile
Re: How are you pre-heating your WVO before the injector
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2018, 02:30:24 PM »

Oh boy, bad one to get me started on. Make coffee or go to next thread now.   :P

The whole concept of heating veg other than to make it flow through filters in freezing conditions is a load of garbage perpetuated by people who don't know better.

The thing is where are you getting the carbon buildup? In the exhaust, the combustion chamber or the ring lands? Some of it is irrelevant and expected, other parts it's a worry. Determine if you DO have a problem or not before you go trying to fix it.

Real short answer is the carbon has NOTHING to do with heating the oil. The whole heating thing is when you look at the physics, totally ridiculous.
There may be several reasons why you are getting carbon build up.  First candidate is veg oil burns a lot different to Diesel.  The ignition timing for want of a better term is 5-10o later in the Cycle.  Bet my backside you haven't re timed the engine to suit Veg oil have you? No, I haven't either and I don't know any one that has.  :0)

Second reason could be loading, another could be oil cleanliness and if it's been dried or has a lot of dissolved water still in it.

What I'll tell you with absolute certainty is that the preheating of the oil has NOTHING to do with the way oil burns in the engine.
Nothing!

Lets look at a couple of FACTS to back that up.
Have a look at the specs of the fuel pump and injector in regards to the viscosity of the fuel they can handle. From memory it's called centistrokes.
Then have a look at the density of veg at various temps.  You will see ANY mechanical fuel pump has the capacity to pump fuel much thicker than  veg ever gets.  Even when it's cold it don't matter because it will gell and stop flowing through the lines and filter before it excedes the pump viscosity tolerance.

This info isn't easy to find ( probably because people just follow the parroted poppycock rather than ask questions) but if you do find it you will see exactly what I found and have related. I did have the info once but it was lost many HDD crashes ago and now I know it, I don't need to have it documented myself.

Another reason preheating is ridiculous is heat transfer.
Lets look at the likely path the oil takes. Out the tank, into your exhaust wrapped coil, into the fuel filter, into the fuel pump and into the injector.
Oil has significantly less thermal capacity than water for a start. That means it heats up faster and has less ability ( density) to retain that heat. It will go a lot hotter than water but that's a different and in this case irrelevant thing. You don't want 200oC fuel going through your filter or pump trust me.

If your engine is cold, you can put the fabled 80oC oil in it and the first thing is it hits a mass of cold oil in the filter.  The filter is attached ( usualy) to the side of the block so if the filter even as hot, it would be shedding heat to the block unless the block was hotter then it would be gaining heat.... to the temp of the block less some.

Next the oil hits the fuel pump. not sure of the weight, maybe a Kilo but again, if the pump is cold it will suck the heat out of the fuel. Whatever temp the pump is the fuel passing through it will be too, less a bit.  Next it goes up the line into the injector.
The injector that is embedded firmly and with significant surface area contact to the head. A 10? KG mass of metal.  Crunch the numbers on how much oil it would take to heat than mass of metal. The injector has small passages and lots of surface area contacting the oil which goes though in tiny amounts.
Only someone kidding themselves ( or a veg oil laws disciple)  would profess that the oil going through that injector is not going to be the same as the injector itself regardless of the temp it was when it entered.

The head is a massive heat sink which is why the injector does not run at some screaming hot temp even when it is exposed to combustion temps where  the flame front impinges on it.  If the head is cold, the oil going through the injector will be. If the head is hot, oil coming out the injector will be near as dammit the same.

Back in the heyday of veg, some bright sparks figured out yet another way to fleece the veg sheeple of their hard earned and add some complication and failure points ( very successfully!) with the creation of " Injector line heaters". These were designed to keep the heat you put in with teh 2 x 20 plate heat exchangers warming your fuel  from escaping out the injector line by wrapping around it and electrically heating it.  :laugh:
In ultimate stupidity, some of the makers of these things claimed they were low wattage and wouldn't overload the electrical system.
You can't have heating capacity with out using more power.

It didn't take much to look at the draw of these heaters, divide it by the number thereof and then see the total electrical input each one had.
Next was too look at the fuel consumption of a vehicle, divide time, rpm etc and come up with an amount of fuel injected per minute per line.  This was easier than it sounds as there were quite a few sources referencing this including commercial stationary engines for fuel burned per HP hr.  From that I took the heat density of oil ( how much power to raise the temp ) and showed that these things had at BEST, the capacity to raise the temp of the oil flowing through the injector line a MAX of 2 oC.  Yep, a whopping and completely insignificant TWO Degrees.
And what i couldn't calculate was the losses from the air flowing over the heater itself or if said air may be hotter than the heater temp and if in fact under certain conditions if the things would not be inhibiting the line temp.

I showed all the maths and calculations on  forums, several times,  and not one person challenged it or found fault in the evidence of my conclusion, yet so many people who had these things still stuck to the notion that it made cold starting easier and the vehicle run better and other fantasy and imagination.
And at the end of the day, you still have that injector jammed in this great cold lump of metal with oil already in it that could not possibly be heated so how in the hell would it make the engine fire better in those first few compression cycles to make the thing start instantly as so many claimed?
I also asked why the hell everyone wanted instant starting in the first place? I had manual glow plugs on the merc I had at the time and i'd wind the thing up then hit the GP's so the thing had a chance to get the oil flowing through it a bit before the thing lit off and had some oil pressure rather than the dry bearings being slammed.


Now I do have a religion/ cult belief with veg oil use and that's water injection.  Very simple, straightforward, uncomplicated, cheap as can be done get some water in the cylinder.  It does NOT have to be put in as a microfine vapor as every commercial manufacturer of WI systems will tell you in order to sell their $1000 500PSI pumps and glorified fittings,  you can drip it in there in a regulated fashion and that will work better for Cleaning purposes.
I prefer pumps for metering and ease of locating tanks and stationary engines are real easy to set up because their load and rpm range is a lot narrower than cars.

Now rather than me just repeating what someone else said who repeated what the guy before him did who went by the guy before him.... I have been running veg oil in my vehicles for 15 years.  A little longer ins stationary engines.  I reckon I have spent more hands on testing time than about 99% of people out there. been running water at least 13 years.  I have used it, experimented with it and know it.  Never had an engine failure on veg yet.
Water is simple, effective and WORKS at keeping engines clean ( even petrol engines) and I would not run a diesel on any fuel without it myself, especially veg.

For a stationary engine all you need to do is drip the water into the intake.  You can also use a pump and a spray. A windscreen washer pump on a micro mist irrigation sprinkler fitting served me well for many 10s of thousands of Km. Till I worked out it was over kill.  Now I use a bit of flattened copper 1/4 tube through a compression fitting screwed into the manifold just after the turbo.
Only 2 things you need to do with WI:
1. control the amount,
2. make sure the water cannot run into the engine when it's stopped.
Even that's not really a big deal, done it a few times and cleared it just by bumping the engine till the water ran past the rings then fired the thing as normal.  Cleared the Cylinder and the water evaporated out the oil soon as the engine got hot.

The amount of water is not critical but you can have it going harder to start to speed up the cleaning process then back off when that is done ( you'll see the engine performance level out) for maintaining and so you don't have to fill your water up so much.  You only need a little to keep the buildup from  becoming significant. Don't even need to run it every time the engine runs, the more regular the better. You need to run it when the engine is under load. I also suggest it's best to let the engine warm up to temp first.

The water going in to the Cylinder in droplets is better for cleaning as it phase changes under the heat and compression on the cylinder and cavitates ( look up true definition of cavitation) which dislodges carbon with micro explosion like events that are enough to dislodge carbon but not enough ( by a long way) to erode metal. The water vapor will get into the ring land area and clean them as well as the ports and the cylinder itself.
On a vehicle, I also believe it is possible that the exhaust, especially the muffler passages are also cleaned and aid in gas flow and subsequently performance.
That was the only possible explanation I could come up with for things I saw on different vehicles with different experiments.  On a stationary engine, probably not that significant.

How much water to add and what if I add too much and hydro-lock the engine?
Hydrolocking is yet another of the baseless fearmongering of the veg world.  With teh exception of dumping a load of water in teh engine through a 1" or larger pipe, you'll well know something wrong before the engine locks up with too much water.  It will probably stop itself.  The thing will be missing, blowing clouds of steam out the exhaust, maybe some water and will barely manage to run...before it stops all together.

I had a mate once who somehow got confused with my recommendation of 300Ml / min injection rate for his 3L  pickup engine. he was telling me as soon as he hit the water the thing lost all power, stuttered, blew steam and water out the exhaust and was undriveable.  I told him this was impossible and he must be adding too much water. He was adamant he was putting in 300ML Min. After a couple of days the penny dropped when he went to refil the water container he was using and worked out the 20 sec he had the thing on should not have half emptied the 2l water bottle he was using. Checked his numbers again and realised he was pushing 3 LITRES of water a minute not 300 Ml!

Corrected the problem and the car was fine, no damage, not even water in the oil and ran perfectly on the recommended 300 MILILITRES a min .  He did not see the slow improvement I said would happen though. reckoned it happened straight off. Probably thanks to the bulk treatment at the beginning. NOT something I recommend but it did show that getting an engine to hydro-lock would take effort and you would know about it well and truly before anything did go bang.

So how much water with your lister? Try 50Ml a min and see how that goes. A ledgend that contributes here, Ed, runs his engines on " sump gunk" being well overused motor oil. He also run WI to stop his engines fouling up and swears by it as well. I forget the water rates he uses now, maybe he'll chime in here.
I'd start with 50Ml / min and see how you go. I'd say 100ml min would be closer to the mark but you'll probably be nervous about it so see how little 50Ml is to put your mind at rest and work up.  if the engine starts to stutter or miss, you'll know to back off a bit but it's not about pumping the max you can in, it's about regular treatment.

You may be able to see an improvement in performance, you'll probably see easier starting if it's a bit hard  and the effect will be more noticeable over time till it gets as good as it's going to and levels out.  In a car you can feel the difference, on a stationary engine it's different.  The exhaust will always be black on a diesel but it's whats happening where you can't see that's the benifit.

Water WON'T give you better fuel economy. In fact when it's set right, it will give you fractionaly less. there is a scientific reason for this I won't bore you more than I already am but getting 10% or whatever better economy is a crock. You will get a touch more power, a lot more potentially if you add 50% Meth to the water ( real fun in my 4WD) you may see easier starting in time ( depending on engine condition you start with) and the engine will run cooler if it's on the limit already. Not usually a problem with Listers.

Forget about wasting your time with fuel pre heating. It's a bogus concept dreamt up by those wanting to make a quick buck selling heat exchangers and " kits" to appease those with the mindset that nothing can be simple, easy, cheap and reliable. These people think adding expense, complication, and failure points is a necessity for anything to work at all.




tyssniffen

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 89
    • View Profile
Re: How are you pre-heating your WVO before the injector
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2018, 11:58:34 PM »
wow. you're blowing my mind here.   this is a bit much to take in. 

just to answer your early questions quickly, before going back to read again:

I get carbon build up on my injector... to the point where I don't seem to be getting fuel injected the next time I cold start (after shutting down on store-bought diesel).  I pull the injector and see the baked on, built up black gunk... I clean it off, put everything back together and it gets running.

so, gotta figure in the cylinder too.

and, while my WVO isn't perfect see-through stuff, I've been running veg in my Dodge for 10-12 years, and I'm putting this better stuff in my lister than I do in my truck.   

Now, I have also just started doing some chemical adding - someone gave me some gasoline with a bit of diesel mixed in, so I'm doing about a cup per gallon... so, what, 1 in 8?  Do you think would be a problem, or a solution?

Tys


BruceM

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1809
    • View Profile
Re: How are you pre-heating your WVO before the injector
« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2018, 02:11:24 AM »
+1 on adjusting your injection timing-  this helped with the injector deposits I got on biodiesel and I suspect it would on WVO, as Glort recommended.  I don't have experience with WVO, but I think the physics (thermal dynamics) of what Glort says on oil heaters is correct.  Especially with a low fuel flow rate like the Lister CS, there is no doubt that the injected oil will be injector body/nozzle temperature regardless of incoming temperature. Ditto the fuel injection pump.  Heating is to have fuel flow in the supply lines.

Watch your loading-  keep it at full operating temperature...don't let it run at less than 1/2 full load. 

+1 on water injection-  beats carbon scraping by a mile.  Spray bottle into the intake of a hot engine at every 3rd or 4th 8 hr lube service or when the knock after starting sounds more pronounced works for me.   A nice black cloud comes out of the exhaust.  Water injection seems essential when burning any fuel that's leaving crud on your injector (and elsewhere less easy to see). 


Tom

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1744
  • Green power is good.
    • View Profile
Re: How are you pre-heating your WVO before the injector
« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2018, 02:27:06 AM »
 There were carbon deposits on my injector, similar to what you describe, when running alternative fuels. I never did resolve the issue and gave up. Diesel prices got cheaper too.
Tom
2004 Ashwamegh 6/1 #217 - ST5 just over 3k hours.

glort

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1205
    • View Profile
Re: How are you pre-heating your WVO before the injector
« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2018, 06:46:05 AM »

I get carbon build up on my injector... to the point where I don't seem to be getting fuel injected the next time I cold start (after shutting down on store-bought diesel).  I pull the injector and see the baked on, built up black gunk... I clean it off, put everything back together and it gets running.

so, gotta figure in the cylinder too.

Might be some buildup on the head and around the valves but i'd say the rings are your real worry! If you are getting that much carbon on the injector, for sure the rings are getting fouled.

I think the timing would be the thing to look at. If you have a clone engine then the thing could have been late in the first place.  Whatever the engine, I'd say it's pretty clear the timing is not suitable for the fuel you are using so I would either be adding 55 ULP at least or better still bringing the timing forward. You may also want to check compression after you put some decent hours on the thing running WI or pull the cylinder and clean the rings as I'm sure will need doing in order to get a proper compression reading.

Some years ago I met up with a chap whom was riding a veg fueled bike around the world on Veg.  he had a chinese type engine in the thing and got a very long way before an accident Rock through sump or something similar) killed his engine. He got another but had endless problems with the thing fouling.  It was needing to be pulled down every day or two's riding.  Changing the timing on these things a great degree is not easy but he brought if forward as he could and also had the engine machined to raise the compression.  There was something else different with this second engine I now forget in the head as well  and he did something with that. In the little port these things have in the intake for squirting oil in for faster starts, he put a fitting in there and dripped water in.

The result was a great improvement but the thing still fouled in a week. He also added ULP and that helped again but this engine just wouldn't run the same as the other and in the end he finished the trip on 50% veg/ Dino as time was starting to get short for his adventure.
I think somehow the timing as different between the 2 engines. There was something different about the 2nd one, something to do with emissions or something and that was where the problem lie I believe.

Had he the time and the heads up at the beginning he could have worked out the timing and set an engine up as needed but from memory he lost the first engine in Africa and of course had to get another engine shipped from home and make up time best he could.
had he been able to machine the pump base to get the timing forward i'm sure the thing would have been OK.

Quote
Now, I have also just started doing some chemical adding - someone gave me some gasoline with a bit of diesel mixed in, so I'm doing about a cup per gallon... so, what, 1 in 8?  Do you think would be a problem, or a solution?

I have read a lot of poppycock about petrol having octane which resists ignition where diesel has cetane which is the opposite. It's said that adding petrol makes the oil harder to light and therefore retarded.  The suggestion is a lot more retarded than the timing would be.
A GOOD petrol engine with modern injection could run 11;! compression, maybe 12 if it was really out there.  A low compression diesel run 16:1.
Trying to say that petrol that won't hold together much more than 10:1 will be slow to light off in an engine with 16:1 or better compression is, as usual, ridiculous and ignorant.

What adding ULP  will do in my very well tested and closely observed experiments is bring the timing of the oil FORWARD and closer to that where normal diesel will light off.  It stands to reason as well as performance testing I have done.
On my old merc  I picked up .5 of a second 0-60 KMH ( wasn't a road long enough to do 60 MPH within 100 km of me) with 5% ULP in the oil and .75 sec with 10%. I did 15% as well but that was a bit dicy with the thing starting to nail under full power so I didn't push numbers.  max ULP they will take is determined by the engine timing, injection rate and other factors.
I also got a .5 sec decrease in 0-60 kmh time with straight water and a full second I believe it was with 50% meth in the water injection. May not sound much but the way thing thing was you really felt the difference and it was way beyond wishful thinking as the stopwatch repeatedly showed.

Doing the timing would be the fix, the WI would be the treatment and prevention of the condition recurring over time.
It would be real easy to test the effectiveness of the wi.  give the thing it's normal run then pump as much water as your fingers can bear down the intake with a spray bottle as Bruce suggests. If the injector is cleaner, there you go.  I really believe a drip into the intake over a loner period of time would be much better but if you see a carbon decrease with a spray, then you have the evidence you need.

If you are getting coking that bad though, I'd suggest you really do need a more constant application of water because the rings are more important than the injectors but the injector coking is a real bad sign of what's happening else where.


tyssniffen

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 89
    • View Profile
Re: How are you pre-heating your WVO before the injector
« Reply #10 on: January 15, 2018, 04:58:32 AM »
I will work on moving the timing up, for sure! 

are you saying you have rigged up a *water injector* somewhere?  can you post a photo?

and /or

+1 on water injection-  beats carbon scraping by a mile.  Spray bottle into the intake of a hot engine at every 3rd or 4th 8 hr lube service or when the knock after starting sounds more pronounced works for me.   A nice black cloud comes out of the exhaust.  Water injection seems essential when burning any fuel that's leaving crud on your injector (and elsewhere less easy to see). 

into the AIR intake?  and just like, a spray from a squirt bottle??

glort

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1205
    • View Profile
Re: How are you pre-heating your WVO before the injector
« Reply #11 on: January 15, 2018, 11:59:48 AM »

Are you saying you have rigged up a *water injector* somewhere?  can you post a photo?

Not at the moment I'm afraid. the engine is just sitting on some castor wheels in the shed and has nothing hooked up.

Quote
into the AIR intake?  and just like, a spray from a squirt bottle??

Yep, into the air intake.

A squirt bottle works for some, I prefer a constant spray/ drip.
A guy I saw put an elbow on his intake so the air cleaner points down. He drilled and tapped his " Injector"  * another bit of flattened pipe through a drilled out compression fitting  into the corner of the elbow and extended it down.
Basically, any water would have to be sucked into teh engine. If it were not running, IE, he forgot to turn it off, it would just run into and out of the air cleaner and leave a puddle on the floor rather than fill the engine.  Any water between pulses would drip into the air cleaner and then be drawn out more as vapor into the engine.

I saw a set-up where a guy sprayed water on his paper air filter because He wanted to go pre turbo but was worried about water hitting the compressor wheel.  He tested wetting the paper and confirmed the water was pulled through as pure vapor and wetting the paper element did no damage at all.
I don't think that is best for cleaning but it sure would be better than nothing.

You can use a small watering nozzle as I did or a bit of flattened copper. I prefer to use a pump but a gravity fed drip will work fine.
there is no right or wrong, just get a bit of water into the engine intake.  Any amount up to about 150Ml/ min will do.  You could put in 100 Ml hr or 5 litres, won't matter.  I think the constant feed is better than a spray and in your case with what you describe you would want to be spraying a whole bottle  at very least every run. I think you would be better with a more constant feed, but if a spray gets the job done, all you need.  :0)

Start with that and see how you go.

mike90045

  • Mendocino Metro
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1151
  • Mmmm BBQ
    • View Profile
    • Mikes Solar PV page
Re: How are you pre-heating your WVO before the injector
« Reply #12 on: January 15, 2018, 08:35:19 PM »
I've been using a spray bottle, I wait till the engine is well heated and running at load, then spend a couple minutes spritzing the intake.  If I time it right, the intake pulse instantly atomizes the stream, and sucks it in. Otherwise, it dribbles in, and I always let the engine run a while afterwards to dry all the parts out, before shutting down.

tyssniffen

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 89
    • View Profile
Re: How are you pre-heating your WVO before the injector
« Reply #13 on: January 15, 2018, 08:58:19 PM »
I've been using a spray bottle, I wait till the engine is well heated and running at load, then spend a couple minutes spritzing the intake.  If I time it right, the intake pulse instantly atomizes the stream, and sucks it in. Otherwise, it dribbles in, and I always let the engine run a while afterwards to dry all the parts out, before shutting down.

cool. so you're pulling off the filter while it's running? 

I'm going to try this, AND work on changing my timing.

BruceM

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1809
    • View Profile
Re: How are you pre-heating your WVO before the injector
« Reply #14 on: January 16, 2018, 12:45:10 AM »
I also pull off the air filter for the spray bottle treatment. As Glort explained, that's not necessary, but i find it satisfying.  I do it while pumping up my 500 gallon air storage tank, usually after a pumping water and laundry. 
I do about a pint, as fast as I can hand spray the bottle.  The engine doesn't stumble at all.

I intend to do a proper water injection system on of these days.