Author Topic: A new British Iron Project  (Read 37373 times)

BruceM

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Re: A new British Iron Project
« Reply #45 on: August 13, 2012, 02:23:48 AM »
A masterpiece, Bob. Glad you were able to get her ready in time for the show.  I'm sure there was a lot of drooling going on around your trio of restored British Iron gems. 

Quinnf

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Re: A new British Iron Project
« Reply #46 on: August 13, 2012, 04:26:24 AM »
You've assembled a nice collection, Bob.  It's great to see and hear them all running.  Almost like being there.  I guess until some genius invents digital scratch-'n-sniff I'll just have to imagine the fragrance of diesel smoke . . .  ;)

Quinn


Ashwamegh 6/1, PowerSolutions 6/1 "Kit" engine, and a Changfa R175a that looks like a Yanmar I once knew

rleonard

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Re: A new British Iron Project
« Reply #47 on: August 13, 2012, 01:18:20 PM »
Thank you all for the kind words.  Those special people that appreciate these engines and the work that goes into a restoration are becoming fewer and further between. 

The Oblong show was well attended and I was paying attention to the attendees.  The under 20 group were mostly grand kids dragged along by Grandpa.  Whenever they could, their attention was back into sending text messages. 

No one has the "knack" any more.  I sure did as a kid.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FlJsPa6UwcM

A 30 something man and his son were looking over my equipment.  He had the dazed look like he hadn't a clue what he was looking at. 

I have wondered what will become of the things I have collected and worked on.  No one in my family could care less so probably off to the auctioneer.

Bob
Faster - Better - Cheaper  You can have any two, but not all three

38ac

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Re: A new British Iron Project
« Reply #48 on: August 13, 2012, 01:46:41 PM »
It was my pleasure to spend a day with Bob before the show and help him get things ready.

  Although I had warned him early on about the ability of a Bamfords engine to put one to sleep he didn't pay heed to my warnings. Here is Bob who is SUPPOSED to be watching the displays while James and I walked the show. In fairness he didn't have a chance! Sitting between 3 running Bamfords will put anyone to sleep in just a few minutes.

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Thob

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Re: A new British Iron Project
« Reply #49 on: August 13, 2012, 02:59:57 PM »

...

I have wondered what will become of the things I have collected and worked on.  No one in my family could care less so probably off to the auctioneer.

Bob

I'm available for adoption ... ;D
Witte 98RC Gas burner - Kubota D600 w/ST7.5KW head.
I'm not afraid to take anything apart.
I am sometimes afraid I'm not going to get it back together.

Quinnf

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Re: A new British Iron Project
« Reply #50 on: August 13, 2012, 09:36:25 PM »
[snip] Sitting between 3 running Bamfords will put anyone to sleep in just a few minutes.


Carbon monoxide will do that, too.   ;D

q.
Ashwamegh 6/1, PowerSolutions 6/1 "Kit" engine, and a Changfa R175a that looks like a Yanmar I once knew

Quinnf

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Re: A new British Iron Project
« Reply #51 on: August 13, 2012, 10:09:34 PM »
Bob,

I know what you mean.  My kids just say, "Cool, Dad," and, "Can you fix this?"  But there's no curiosity as to what makes something work.  I can't relate to that, because I have always HAD to know how something works.  When I was in college studying biochemistry all my friends - every last one of them - were engineering majors.  Those were the people I gravitated toward.  I was the only non-engineering major in the college ham radio club, too, and one of only a few who actually diddled around with making electronic gadgets.  When I took the test in order to use the engineering department's shop equipment, I argued with the TA who was administering the test, explaining to him why you don't use a miter gauge and a rip fence on a tablesaw together to cut off short pieces of wood, and if you must do so, why you don't stand directly in line with the blade, and why you don't cut fiberglass on a bandsaw.  The shop super agreed that was an oversight, thanked me, told me I passed, and modified the test.  

Flew to Steamboat Springs to go skiing with girlfriend.  Her girlfriend and hubby drove in from Indiana.  When they got there, hubby explained they hardly made it up the hill; they had the (old Volvo) engine tuned up just before they left and it ran like crap the whole way.  It was dusk, and it was snowing, but I had a couple ideas, so I asked him to flip the lid.  The exhaust manifold and header pipe were glowing dull red.  I looked around and found that plug wires #2 and #3 were swapped.  Next morning as we left, it was 10 degrees and had snowed during the night.  The driveway out of the rented cabin went down into a gully then up a steep grade to the main road.  It's hard for a cold carbureted engine to transition from running in compression mode to full throttle.  The cold engine died in the bottom of the gully.  The driver couldn't get it to start.  Thick black smoke and smell of raw gas.  From the smell I knew what the problem was.  Asked him to flip the lid, then found a forked stick and jammed it in the top of the carb (they had those things in 1983) to hold the automatic choke valve open in the thin high altitude air.  Got back in the car, engine started and we were off for a day of skiing, rather than waiting for AAA.  Yeah, I got laid that night.  My girlfriend (now my wife) says her friend and hubby still talk about that and wonder how I knew what the problem was.  The guy's now an attorney; a smart guy, but knew nothing about cars.

Those things shouldn't be unusual, but like Bob says, they are increasingly so these days.  I was raised in a family of schoolteachers.  Never had any money to pay someone else to do anything for us.  My dad taught math, science and industrial arts.  Changed his own oil, replaced his own brakes, and showed me how to do so.  He built cabinets nights and weekends and usually worked on a house with a few of his teacher-buddies every summer.  They don't teach autoshop at our local highschool anymore.  Neither is there woodshop or metal shop.  Kids aren't taught how to build crummy birdhouses or how to bend and solder sheet metal into a tool tray festooned with meathooks to give to their Dad for Christmas.  One wonders how we'll survive in an economy dominated by fast food joints and banking service centers.

Quinn
« Last Edit: August 13, 2012, 10:26:21 PM by Quinnf »
Ashwamegh 6/1, PowerSolutions 6/1 "Kit" engine, and a Changfa R175a that looks like a Yanmar I once knew

sid

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Re: A new British Iron Project
« Reply #52 on: August 14, 2012, 01:02:54 AM »
quinn. I know where you are coming from..40 years of collecting and no one in the family is interested in anything except a cell phone.ipads etc.large collection of engines,corn mill and antique tools and not one of the family can start a lawn mower,the common thing is,I will get some one else to fix it...it is sad to see a generation that can not understand how something works and are afraid to get their hands dirty...so sad //sid
15 hp fairbanks morris1932/1923 meadows mill
8 hp stover 1923
8 hp lg lister
1932 c.s bell hammer mill
4 hp witte 1917
5 hp des jardin 1926
3 hp mini petters
2hp hercules 1924
1 1/2 briggs.etc

dieselgman

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Re: A new British Iron Project
« Reply #53 on: August 14, 2012, 02:32:45 AM »
Same thing with my kids and grandkids as well... sure would be wonderful to hand down the business but they are lacking interest in this sort of thing. Current generations seem to be mostly about immediate gratification not so much about investments for their future well-being. Another sign of the times, sadly.

dieselgman
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OKFarmer

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Re: A new British Iron Project
« Reply #54 on: August 14, 2012, 04:56:38 AM »
Hey Fellas,

We must be an anomoly in our home. I am 39 and work as an IT Director in Banking and Information Technology. BUT! We live on the farm where we raise 1000 acres of wheat.  My daughter is 15 and never really showed a lot of interest in mechanical things, but knows her way around the place, helps with equipment moves and knows what makes the farm tick. She's a heck of a shot too!

My 8 soon-to-be 9 year old son is my shadow. He constantly is asking questions and wants to understand how things work. He loves working on the combine or tractors (we do all our own maintenance) and he understands things when I show him.  He is becoming really handy and he's only 8!  He loves tilling things and working in the garden and he loves animals.

My 7 soon-to-be 8 year old is a little less interested in mechanics, but loves building fence, he's practiced all summer and can drive a 16p nail all by himself. He's not as much on the animals, but loves the outdoors, and is very inquisitive.

I was Dilbert in the YouTube posted above. I took everything apart and back together again. I loved building things as a kid. I rebuilt neighborhood kids bicycles, and loved working on anything with an engine. I'm ad electronics and technology nut, and can wrench on about anything. Maintenance and repair on combines and tractors or implements is my forte and I enjoy working on big working-diesels.

There's hope guys! Sure my kids like their iToys and other gadgets, but they are grounded, are all learning a work ethic, and are learning the arts of mechanics and construction. They are all educated and comfortable around a firearm, by driving age will be changing their own oil and know how to change a tire.  Most important they love Jesus!

What more can a guy ask for?

rleonard

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Re: A new British Iron Project
« Reply #55 on: August 14, 2012, 09:38:21 AM »
OK,
Your note is a breath of fresh air.  The values and skills that your family is developing is a reflection of what you have shown them.  

You have every right to be proud of them.  Congratulations.

Bob
« Last Edit: August 18, 2012, 12:26:58 PM by rleonard »
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contaucreek

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Re: A new British Iron Project
« Reply #56 on: August 14, 2012, 11:23:16 AM »
I dont mind one bit when I get to explain how the equipment at a show works. Thats what I like the best.I dont know anything about under the hood of a new car but my friend who is an automotive whiz hand picked for the GM tech helpline didnt know how a hit and miss engine worked.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2012, 11:24:57 AM by contaucreek »
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38ac

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Re: A new British Iron Project
« Reply #57 on: August 14, 2012, 01:28:24 PM »
I am in agreement that there is less interest in mechanical things than in the past but I also think that preservation and playiing with old equipment has always been the hobby of "older types" not young men.  I am in my mid fifties and remember my father saying the same thing 40 years ago, nobody has interest and the hobby will die with us (them).  Personally my interests in antiquities and preservation was pretty much zilch until I was in my mid 40s. While most young people cannot explain hit miss governing they can do things with an I-phone so fast it makes my head spin. Of what importance is that? some might say.  Those with no interest in our hobby will rightfully ask  of what importance is your old flywheels going round and round?  Some will get it at some point in life, some wont, there are older types today who don't know diesel fuel from gasoline don't ya know?  I have two sons, 21 and 22. One gets it when it comes to old flywheels going round and round the other doesn't. Both are mechanics by trade and damn good ones I must say. One goes with me to shows, the other plays with an I-phone in his spare time.
What's all this ramble about? I don't think I know for sure, LOL but I don't think there is reason for panic over who is going to carry on. Many of the guys who collected when these things were available for scrap price are passing on and many huge collections are being sold and the prices will make a person's head spin. Somebody has interest for sure ;)
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rleonard

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Re: A new British Iron Project
« Reply #58 on: August 18, 2012, 03:06:57 AM »
I am getting this setup in the shop.  I had to bolt it to the floor to keep the rig from creeping.  I guess that makes it a semi-permanant home. 

All hooked up and running except for the electrical tie in.  That will happen tomorrow.




Bob
Faster - Better - Cheaper  You can have any two, but not all three

BruceM

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Re: A new British Iron Project
« Reply #59 on: August 18, 2012, 04:19:43 PM »
I find the black flywheels with green stripe very attractive. Something I haven't seen before. It's just the right amount of bling for the vintage. A very classy restoration!