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Author Topic: MIG Welder, what to look for?  (Read 323 times)

glort

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Re: MIG Welder, what to look for?
« Reply #45 on: May 18, 2019, 09:19:54 AM »
Hi Guys, when I was on the tools in the UK, I would only buy Makita tools.

My mate that Does AC has a huge collection of makita. Used to use Dewalt but like a lot of other people I know gave them away.
He is very happy with them but far as I know are all battery units. The battery chainsaws he has are VERY good.

I have a whole big Kit of Makita tools.  Were bought, unpacked out their Boxes, put in the carry bag and have been untouched.  They sit in my office cupboard and that's where they are going to stay just as they are.

I spose buying a new toy would be exciting for most blokes. Just seems like a chore the way I'm feeling atm but I pushed myself today to do some things so I'll try to keep pushing  next week to find something. 

BruceM

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Re: MIG Welder, what to look for?
« Reply #46 on: May 18, 2019, 04:01:48 PM »
Thanks Glort, they will be relatively small values and not high enough current for welding.  a 3000 watt inverter with 230vac output will have filtering chokes for 15-30 amps. The needed 150amp or better for a 24vdc welder is going to make for big wire and a big core.  Expensive commercially because of size and weight in electrical steel and copper.  Since there will be a strong stray magentic field from an E-I core, with changes in current, I'll stick to the tedious gapped toroid, wound in two layers for better self cancelling.  If I ordered one to be made, I'd be out near $1000.  I can make it with a surplus core for about $70 worth of copper. I might be able to get a puny 250 uh without saturation at 150a.

I have doubts about the project- no telling if the welding fumes will be more than I can handle, or if the variations in welding current which the researcher noted are rapid and will cause substantial AC magnetic field.  I hate failed expensive projects, though often much more is learned.