Author Topic: The rarely heard of, yet incredible SVO source  (Read 23197 times)

Halfnuts

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 259
    • View Profile
Re: The rarely heard of, yet incredible SVO source
« Reply #15 on: April 27, 2006, 05:18:18 PM »
You've mentioned aspen which is native, but there's also poplar like the Lombardy (Populus nigra) which grows fast and tall, providing good shade.  It's good in zones 3-9.  You're in zone 5b http://www.usna.usda.gov/Hardzone/hzm-sw1.html so it should be fine there.  Cedars/junipers/cypress should also should do well there.  You're too cold for Italian cypress which makes a dandy hedge/windbreak (as opposed to a breakwind) and grows tall and fast.  There might be another variety that can handle your climate.  Run a drip line around the roots and feed it slowly and the water should be cool by the time it gets there.  Alkalai in the water and soil might be a problem, though.  Some soil amendment, eg. till in some compost, is a good idear until they get established.  Last time I was through there with the kids and motorhome I didn't see anything other than grass between you and about Cody.

Halfnuts

hotater

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1557
    • View Profile
Re: The rarely heard of, yet incredible SVO source
« Reply #16 on: April 28, 2006, 12:49:02 AM »
halfnuts---   The grass was planted. Sage brush and sprouts of wire is normal. .  ;)

Lombardi's do well in deeper soils but tip over here.  I can't dig a deep enough hole.  Cedar and junipers are native to more acid soils near here but definite fire hazards to have around the buildings.   
I had great luck with "Austrees" north of here in better soil.   I've got some cuttings and will try more here. They grow more than a foot a year in dry country.

The lack of legal water and the total lack of soil is the real problem.  Dirt here is silica-rich ryholite clays and gravels for about a foot and then bedrock....OR just bedrock sticking out of the ground.  The beavers get anything planted in the wet ground around the creek and drought, locust, and range cattle get the rest.    :)

But I'm about to bring in a trailer load of peat moss and cow manure and try to fool Ma Nature into thinking 'cool Aspen glade'.    There's a natural stand of eight Aspens about a mile from here at State Line Springs.  I may have to take a day and go over and study them by taking a nap under them in the heat of the day.   8) 8)

.....and fish the creek on the way back.
7200 hrs on 6-1/5Kw, FuKing Listeroid,
Currently running PS-Kit 6-1/5Kw...and some MPs and Chanfas and diesel snowplows and trucks and stuff.

solarguy

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 240
    • View Profile
Re: The rarely heard of, yet incredible SVO source
« Reply #17 on: April 28, 2006, 03:47:48 PM »

But I'm about to bring in a trailer load of peat moss and cow manure and try to fool Ma Nature into thinking 'cool Aspen glade'.    There's a natural stand of eight Aspens about a mile from here at State Line Springs.  I may have to take a day and go over and study them by taking a nap under them in the heat of the day.   8) 8)

.....and fish the creek on the way back.

Doing the right thing, being observant, taking care of the planet for future generations...

I see the tremendous hard work you are doing in this area and hope you are able to withstand all the stress and strain.

Finest regards,

troy

ixtow

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 69
    • View Profile
Re: The rarely heard of, yet incredible SVO source
« Reply #18 on: May 09, 2006, 03:44:43 AM »
Back to Chinese Tallow...

I live in a County of Florida that shows to already be 'infected' by this plant.

http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Florida&statefips=12&symbol=TRSE6

How might I go about locating these little buggers?  I've never hunted a tree before...

No harm in fooling with something that's already here.  May as well see if I can put it to use.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2006, 03:46:38 AM by ixtow »

solarguy

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 240
    • View Profile
Re: The rarely heard of, yet incredible SVO source
« Reply #19 on: May 10, 2006, 11:35:20 PM »
The two places I would start asking are:

1.  Your county almost certainly has a county agricultural extension agent.  If they don't know, they know who knows.

2.  Call the nearest college/university and ask at the biology department who the local invasive species expert is.  If they don't have an expert, they'll have somebody who knows something and can point you in the right direction.

Good luck and keep us posted.

troy

SHIPCHIEF

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 726
    • View Profile
Re: The rarely heard of, yet incredible SVO source
« Reply #20 on: May 10, 2006, 11:45:55 PM »
Is there anything useful in Japanese Knotweed? Out here in the Seattle area the Knotweed fights the Himalayan Blackberry, another unwelcome pest. I'd love it if they would fight each other to a standstill...oh, and kill the morning glories in the fracas.  Mabe wipe out the Starlings too? (one can hope)
Ashwamegh 25/2 & ST12
Lister SR2 10Kw 'Long Edurance' genset on a 10 gallon sump/skid,
Onan 6.5NH in an old Jeager Compressor trailer and a few CCK's

Thomas

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 83
    • View Profile
Re: The rarely heard of, yet incredible SVO source
« Reply #21 on: May 11, 2006, 07:13:29 AM »
Hay Shipchief is the devils club  still alive and well ther ?  It ysed to be a big problem in the valley around Kent.  Tom T

SHIPCHIEF

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 726
    • View Profile
Re: The rarely heard of, yet incredible SVO source
« Reply #22 on: May 11, 2006, 07:35:24 PM »
Well, I think it is being crowded out by another invasive species; the high density single family home development. 50' x 70' lots, almost like Baltimore row houses!
Scott E
Ashwamegh 25/2 & ST12
Lister SR2 10Kw 'Long Edurance' genset on a 10 gallon sump/skid,
Onan 6.5NH in an old Jeager Compressor trailer and a few CCK's

Thomas

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 83
    • View Profile
Re: The rarely heard of, yet incredible SVO source
« Reply #23 on: May 11, 2006, 08:15:11 PM »
And you cant understand any of them at least I cant :(  Tom T

ixtow

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 69
    • View Profile
Re: The rarely heard of, yet incredible SVO source
« Reply #24 on: May 21, 2006, 11:06:35 PM »
I just wandered around my property for a bit, and noticed I have this dirty little Triadica Sebifera growing right in my own backyard, literally.

Hmmm..........

oldnslow

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 150
    • View Profile
Re: The rarely heard of, yet incredible SVO source
« Reply #25 on: May 22, 2006, 09:58:01 PM »
Whatever you do, be responsible ie don't just throw the seeds around anywhere. As a former Department of Agriculture inspector In Florida I can tell you that any plant declared invasive is illegal to knowingly move via seeds or cuttings for the purpose of propagating or establishing elsewhere in the state.

This may sound silly because birds move Brazilian Pepper all over the place. It is a fact though and you can get nailed by a nosey neighbor, etc so tell no one. Getting nailed probably just means a warning at first but then you are marked and will be checked once and a while. Not good.  If you intend to move a tallow plant to your yard to study, it would be best to keep it to yourself. (IE, don't call in an "airstrike")

If you concientiously develop a system where the plant can be contained and it's byproducts used sucessfully, keep it to yourself until it works perfectly. Start small. Special permits can then be applied for and a working model makes a very convincing argument. I thought of trying this myself and with a little ingenuity it might work. But know the risks before you start.
Mistakes are the cost of tuition.

ixtow

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 69
    • View Profile
Re: The rarely heard of, yet incredible SVO source
« Reply #26 on: May 22, 2006, 11:26:13 PM »
That's good advice since I'm not on the SS's good side anyway...  I shouldn't mail them some custom-made lightning-bolt armbands with a note saying I have 'evil' trees, eh?  :-P

But I'm way out in the middle of nowhere, and I just found 2 more of them along the edge of my property.  Total of 3 then.  2 of them look like they're at least 4 years old, the other is smaller maybe 2 years old.  It isn't flowering at all but the larger two are.  I'll just work with them where they are.

They aren't growing too well.  They're survivng, but that's about it.  The biggest one might be 6 years old, and is barely 8 feet tall.  Really long thin branches with sparse foliage.  I live on top of a rather high sandy ridge, Triadica Sebifera prefers lower mashy soil, and this is just a big sand trap...  I can't even grow weeds here.  I doubt I could propogate them even if I tried.

But the small size will make them nice study samples.  When the fruits/seeds produce in the fall, I'll have a nice small plant to experiment with harvesting.  And I can shoot the birds with my Son's BB gun so they don't spread it... yeah...  that's a good excuse...  ;-)

I was thinking of a large tarp/canvass that was sloped to one side and had a hole in the middle for the trunk to fit.  High side about 5 feet up, low side on the ground/in a trough to collect the falling seeds.  Maybe shake them out to expedite.  They're small and flimsy enough that I can do it by hand without a machine.  Yield won't be useful, but it's a plan for experimentation.

It seems little is supposedly know about how it propogates.  Or rather, they don't want to talk about it cuz someone might start doing it.

I have a 12 ton hydraulic shop press.  I figure I'll make up some steel tubing, capped, and a piston for a small scale pressing deal, and see how it goes come fall.  Come to think of it....  A galvanized pipe nipple with an end cap, and a piece of loose-fitting steel bar as a piston.

Now all I need is a Lister.........  I wish I had the money to snatch up the 24/2 that's for sale less than 65 miles from my house....

Thomas

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 83
    • View Profile
Re: The rarely heard of, yet incredible SVO source
« Reply #27 on: May 23, 2006, 02:30:34 AM »
What is he asking for the 24/2

ixtow

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 69
    • View Profile
Re: The rarely heard of, yet incredible SVO source
« Reply #28 on: May 23, 2006, 03:22:40 AM »
I asked, but didn't get a reply.  Most anything rational is out of my price range for the next few weeks....

binnie

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 219
    • View Profile
Re: The rarely heard of, yet incredible SVO source
« Reply #29 on: May 23, 2006, 03:29:25 AM »
Ixtow.... Have you checked into how they harvest Olives in Italy...with a net below the tree to catch what drops... It may be what you are looking for in respect to harvesting the berries. Just a thought.  Will be watching for your post on results. binnie
Listeroid 12/2 Jkson with 10kw head, for backup now on diesel. Future interests: WVO, bio,  Cogen - Heat exchangers - solar.