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Author Topic: aa1  (Read 10847 times)

mobile_bob

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Re: aa1
« Reply #15 on: July 10, 2009, 04:20:27 AM »
Jens:

i never activated the series parallel switch to deliver 24 volt until the driver started cranking on 12
and i would release the 24 just as the engine began to start.

i don't have a clue how long a 12 volt starter would put up with being force fed 24volts
but it generally didn't take but a max burst of about 10-15 seconds to get the job done.
often times a 5 second burst was enough to get the engine started.

i would think on a lister, if you are using a standard car starter like one off a chevy
it would not need 24volts to crank the liveing crap out of it.

you mention slow cranking? is your battery in good shape? cables big enough? good connections?

i can't imagine needing 24volt burst to crank over a listeroid.

maybe if it is very cold?

you might try activating both the glowplugs and the comp release and crank it up to speed
and then drop the comp release?
a bit of hot air pumping through can't hurt in my opinion.

bob g

otherpower.com, microcogen.info, practicalmachinist.com
(useful forums), utterpower.com for all sorts of diy info

mobile_bob

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Re: aa1
« Reply #16 on: July 10, 2009, 07:08:44 AM »
Jens:

you could probably do what you are after, with less costly relays
or starter solenoids rather than the expensive series/parallel switches

i havent bought on in over 25 years and i am not sure anyone uses them anymore
and iirc the smaller 2 post unit was 200bucks and the larger 4 post isolated version was about twice that.

as opposed to 10 dollar ford starter relays and a few other small automotive iso cube relays, some logic control
and you could probably do what you want for a small fraction of one of those delco units

i used one of the 4 post units because i needed "dead" leads until i hit the remote switch
and needed a way of charging both halves of the bank on 12 volts supplied by the service van

gotta be a cheaper way, mainly because you don't need "dead" leads.

bob g
otherpower.com, microcogen.info, practicalmachinist.com
(useful forums), utterpower.com for all sorts of diy info