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Author Topic: WMO load test  (Read 35483 times)

rbodell

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Re: WMO load test
« Reply #30 on: January 22, 2008, 08:43:54 PM »
I thiunk the expansion chamber makes a lot of difference. Also the expansion chamber being deadened by the dirt works pretty good too. Actual engine noise like the valves and alternator would probably take an engine cover of some sort or maybe some bushes between you and the neighbors.

The expansion chamber helps with exhaust noise but does nothing about the characteristic diesel knock of the engine.

Jens

that will probably take an engine box or shed with insulation
The shear depth of my shallowness is perplexing yet morbidly interesting. Bob 2007

vtmetro

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Re: WMO load test
« Reply #31 on: December 17, 2010, 12:44:11 AM »
Just noticed a couple of errors early on in this thread where sodium hydroxide is mentioned for raising pH of WMO.

One poster said Drano was lye. It isn't Drano contains lye (which is sodium hydroxide in the States) but also contains salt, aluminum pellets and sodium nitrate.

Another poster says you can obtain "NaO" instead. The proper formula for sodium hydroxide is NaOH.

Lye is still available in bottles in Vermont at the hardware store, so it seems to more a matter of low demand these days than unavailability for any security reason..

buickanddeere

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Re: WMO load test
« Reply #32 on: December 17, 2010, 03:23:24 AM »
2000 rpm on the engine and 1800 rpm at the head. I am currently running the engine at 1625 rpm and 1800 rpm at the head. This gives me a maximum of 6kw with lots of smoke but it is so quiet at this speed the sacrifice is worth it for now. The pulleys are 3 sheave using B series belts. Maybe come summer I'll dig up a water pump and install a turbo.

John

  Difficult to beat the simplicity and reliability of direct drive.

buickanddeere

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Re: WMO load test
« Reply #33 on: December 17, 2010, 03:28:31 AM »

Quote

Yeah mine is like that. You can stand beside it and talk in a normal voice. The noise is the valves and alternator. Nice chug from the exhaust but you have tio get within a couple of feet to hear the exhaust.
Quote

 Any noise from the intake manifold/filter? Air compressor are notoriously noisy on the intake side.A diesel engine is little different.
 I used to flip the breather lid over to hear all four barrels open up on a 350 Chev. What a howl. Used to imagine the noise was worth another 10-15HP.

rbodell

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Re: WMO load test
« Reply #34 on: February 03, 2011, 02:39:28 AM »
There are thousands of emergency standby generators in Washington State. Some of these sites must pay to have their WMO disposed of. I have sources that donate their oil to me. I don't even charge them for it!

The answer to would I use oil that is of unknown quality? Only during WTSHTF times. But then any oil will be like gold.

I will say this. If I found a source of WVO I would not use WMO. And I would not make BioDiesel out of it. I would filter it and use it as is.

John

I charge people $1 a gallon if they drop off small amounts. I don't make anything on that because not much comes that way but it does pay for oil changes, engine degreaser and grease. If they have a 55 gallon drum I pick it up for free. The best part is that unlike gasoline or even diesel fuel which eventually goes bad, WMO is forever. I have enough that it sets for a year before I even process it so there is already almost nothing in it. It has already settled to the bottom. Whenever I want some more, I just put a "WANTED" request on freecycle.

The shear depth of my shallowness is perplexing yet morbidly interesting. Bob 2007

rbodell

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Re: WMO load test
« Reply #35 on: February 03, 2011, 02:42:23 AM »
I just did a 4 hour load test of my 195 with an ST10¬  on 15-40 WMO today. Nothing fancy, started on diesel and when the engine temp got to 185 degrees¬  I changed over to WMO. No pre-heat. Oil temp was at 70 degrees. No smoke at all until I reached 9kw then it was a light gray up to 10kw where it started to turn black. The engine seemed to like it. Less noise. Engine temp at 10kw was 210 degrees. I switched back to diesel for 30 minutes prior to shutdown. I think the WMO makes more horsepower than diesel. On diesel the HZ is 62.5 unloaded and 56.0 full load. On WMO the HZ is 62.5 unloaded and 59.3 full load. Not very scientific but educational for me.

John

As an update, I now use 100% wmo. It works fine down to 10 degrees F without starting it on diesel.

I have used wmo in my engine up to 50%. At almost 500 hours I had the head off and found little coking, no corosion and no cylinder damage.

I run my wmo through a dieselcraft centrifuge filter. I do run it a lot longer than necessary, about three hours for around 7 gallons. I process about 7 gallons at a time. I am still running my original Goldenrod 10 micron fuel filter on the engine. I check the PH by taking a little oil and adding some distilled water and shaking it up and let it settle, I then check it with litmus paper. I bring down the PH by adding some Sodium Hydroxide and water and letting it recirculate. Before I found a source of Sodium Hydroxide, I used draino.

I have had no problems so far.

The shear depth of my shallowness is perplexing yet morbidly interesting. Bob 2007

rbodell

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Re: WMO load test
« Reply #36 on: February 03, 2011, 02:52:01 AM »
one of the coolest things i ever saw in regard to nitrous and a diesel engine
was at seattle international raceway about 5 or 6 years ago

a couple of old dudes brought a single axle Kenworth with a twin turbo 8v71 detroit with an mt40 allison 5 speed with two 120lb
nitrous bottles.

super single rear tires capped as slicks

ran low 11's in the quarter in exhibition

pretty cool, not a top fuel dragster, but it got all us diesel mechanics up off the bleachers :)

bob g

Shuckins, This is my kids school bus leaving the bus stop in the mornings.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4fgymQBwHIo
The shear depth of my shallowness is perplexing yet morbidly interesting. Bob 2007

rbodell

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Re: WMO load test
« Reply #37 on: May 18, 2012, 01:54:34 AM »
Quote

I am a little confused on why you would adjust the ph in WMO? Adding lye to the oil doesn't seem right to me. And also where do you get litmus paper for WMO?

I think he adds only water for testing, and if it's too acidic, adds both Water & Lye for adjusting and , and uses ordinary everyday litmus paper to test the water.   When the water tests fine, he de-waters the fuel.  At least that's how I'm understanding his process.   WMO tends to acidify while it's in use in the engine (combustion byproducts)

That is exactly correct
The shear depth of my shallowness is perplexing yet morbidly interesting. Bob 2007