Author Topic: heating the injection line  (Read 25763 times)

jimmer

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heating the injection line
« on: February 03, 2006, 07:56:52 PM »
The title says it all.

Is anyone heating the line from the injection pump to the injector when using WVO?

I am setting up a WVO system and am not sure if I need to include that line in the heating circuit.

Thanks,

Jim

sb118

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Re: heating the injection line
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2006, 12:01:45 AM »
If you are running on WVO or SVO, you should only switch over from pump fuel once the engine is up to working temperature. This will mean the injecto line is aleady heated.
First love - 1975 Lister SR1, gone to a better place (running a saw bench actually ;))

True love - unknown vintage CS6/1 with SOM flywheels

linkie to the project so far --- http://jestersltd.com/pics/index.php

Lister owners do it at 650 strokes a minute ;)

jimmer

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Re: heating the injection line
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2006, 12:40:50 AM »
Why must the engine be at working temperature?

My WVO tank and lines will be heated.

These engines take quite a while to reach working temperature.

Thanks,

Jim

sb118

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Re: heating the injection line
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2006, 02:05:39 PM »
Trying to start a cold engine, with cold oil in the pump system is hard, the oil isn't viscous enough to spray proporly from the injector, once the eingine is warmed up, the oil "melts" a bit and is then suitable for the injector to use.

I'm running my van on WVO and even with heated fuel lines, the oil that is in the pump when the engine cools overnight, is enough to give me serious problems to start in the morning if i forget to switch back to pump fuel before i park up.

I've been doing the WVO thing for years now, it's great when it's warm, but cold nights mean cold engines, cold engines mean cold oil, cold oil means you can dislocate your shoulder before your eninge will fire!
First love - 1975 Lister SR1, gone to a better place (running a saw bench actually ;))

True love - unknown vintage CS6/1 with SOM flywheels

linkie to the project so far --- http://jestersltd.com/pics/index.php

Lister owners do it at 650 strokes a minute ;)

jimmer

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Re: heating the injection line
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2006, 02:32:48 PM »
sb118,

I know you don't start or stop on WVO. I was asking about the working temperature statement.

I'm still not sure the injector line will be heated enough by the engine alone.

Are you running WVO in your Listeroid?

Thanks,

Jim

sb118

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Re: heating the injection line
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2006, 02:41:01 PM »
Ahh sorry, didn't mean to teach you to suck eggs, new to the board, not worked out who is doing what yet!

The engine heat will be sufficient to warm the injector line, the heatsoak from the cylinder head will do the job, adding extra heating will be wasted.

Still running my aircooled single on dino diesel right now, working on my engine room (soundproofing the shed basically) so i can put two tanks in place properly. (got a big supply of used engine oil lined up too)
First love - 1975 Lister SR1, gone to a better place (running a saw bench actually ;))

True love - unknown vintage CS6/1 with SOM flywheels

linkie to the project so far --- http://jestersltd.com/pics/index.php

Lister owners do it at 650 strokes a minute ;)

jimmer

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Re: heating the injection line
« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2006, 06:21:27 PM »
After running my 8/1 (185 deg. thermostat) under load for 3 hours today I observed the following:

Building 45 deg. F.

Head too hot to touch (no surprise).

Radiator good and hot.

Injector line not even warm to the touch. I assume that the cool diesel fuel is keeping the line cool.

It seems like heating the injector line might be a good idea.

One thing for sure, the block is not heating the injector line.

Comments??

Thanks,

Jim

sb118

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Re: heating the injection line
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2006, 06:55:09 PM »
Must admit, i'm amazed. Normally the oil gets masses of heat from the fuel pump and that seems to be fine.

If you've got surplus heat to put towards the injector line, go for it.

Are you hoping to cut down the "switch over" time between fuels?
First love - 1975 Lister SR1, gone to a better place (running a saw bench actually ;))

True love - unknown vintage CS6/1 with SOM flywheels

linkie to the project so far --- http://jestersltd.com/pics/index.php

Lister owners do it at 650 strokes a minute ;)

jimmer

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Re: heating the injection line
« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2006, 07:10:45 PM »
Yes, currently my daily runtime seldom exceeds 3 or 4 hours.

Thanks,

Jim

GerryH

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Re: heating the injection line
« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2006, 07:55:35 PM »
If I can get enough WVO to make it worth doing I have been thinking of using a large 45 gal drum for cooling and putting a 20 gallon day tank mounted inside the coolant tank. If you start and stop on diesel the coolant will keep the WVO liquid. I had thought of using WVO as the coolant, but the mess every time I took the head of would be a rel pain.

kyradawg

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Re: heating the injection line
« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2006, 03:03:02 AM »
I run start and stop on un heated wvo in my 1987 Ford f-250! Its only mandatory to switch over if you are running wvo with a high fat content a easy way to get rid of the fat is to decant the oil. Bottle the oil while it is warm or warm it then simply let the fat settle to the bottom and pour off the golden good juice!

Peace&Love :D, Darren

sb118

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Re: heating the injection line
« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2006, 10:08:54 AM »
Does the F-250 have haeter plugs? I'm running a 95 Transit (without heaters) and it refuses point blank to start from cold with asistance.

First love - 1975 Lister SR1, gone to a better place (running a saw bench actually ;))

True love - unknown vintage CS6/1 with SOM flywheels

linkie to the project so far --- http://jestersltd.com/pics/index.php

Lister owners do it at 650 strokes a minute ;)

kyradawg

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Re: heating the injection line
« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2006, 04:16:08 PM »


Peace&Love, :D Darren
« Last Edit: August 03, 2006, 05:19:42 PM by kyradawg »

sb118

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Re: heating the injection line
« Reply #13 on: February 06, 2006, 01:01:18 AM »
heh, not here it doesn't! i cold filter mine, and high melting point fats get caught in the filters (read that as clog the hell out of the filters :(), so all that goes into the van is the good stuff, it just gets too thick overnight for me not to have to swear at it.
First love - 1975 Lister SR1, gone to a better place (running a saw bench actually ;))

True love - unknown vintage CS6/1 with SOM flywheels

linkie to the project so far --- http://jestersltd.com/pics/index.php

Lister owners do it at 650 strokes a minute ;)

FreedomFried

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Re: heating the injection line
« Reply #14 on: February 10, 2006, 12:56:07 AM »
I'm planning on running WVO in my lister and was going to wrap some copper tubing around the exaust pipe to heat up the oil before it hits the injector pump. Does anybody see a problem with this other than maybe the oil getiing too hot?
John
Mooresville, NC
6/1 GM 90
1982 WVO Mazda B2200