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Messages - dieselspanner

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1
Listeroid Engines / Re: Skip (miss)
« on: January 22, 2019, 07:11:43 AM »
Invented by George Dowty, one of the last 'generalist' engineers.....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Dowty

Cheers
Stef

2
Listeroid Engines / Re: Good price?
« on: January 21, 2019, 09:29:04 PM »
+ another 1!

Have a read of the stuff on the WOK, especially the sand stuff, take all your own tools, and a torch, in order to pop the inspection hatch at the minimum, make sure you have sockets, attacking it with a monkey wrench won't make you look very professional, be nice and if you can, show the seller some of the stuff from here that details the pitfalls of Rajkot iron on a tablet, fix your top price and take that much - and no more - in cash, when you are getting close flash the cash and ask which he would prefer you to walk away with, remember that lister(iod)s are like nurses and buses, there's always another one coming down the road, eventually......

Cheers
Stef

3
Original Lister Cs Engines / Re: injector pump
« on: January 21, 2019, 11:53:19 AM »
I had one of those, Bob, both the injector and the pump were full of the best preservative known to man. Sadly it was almost insoluble in diesel!

Ask me how I know about stripping CS pumps and injectors..........

Cheers
Stef

4
Original Lister Cs Engines / Re: injector pump
« on: January 20, 2019, 08:26:40 PM »
Hi John,
I've used the same drawing for reference when stripping down the pump for my 6/1, It's a good start point. See this YouTube clip for the details of the 'jerk' type pump in action.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FgCi66BqUE

It's not a big thing to strip down, but make sure you get the rack in the correct position when you reassemble it. There may be a 'witness mark' on the rack as you look into the pump body from underneath, before you pull it all to bits see if you can relate the mark to the plungers position as you move it back and forwards, the first pump I stripped had one, and I only found it when I had all of the pieces in a shallow pan (Fray Bentos steak and kidney pie dishes are good!) of diesel.

If you have no mark, don't worry, study the video and in a couple of minuets you should be able to work it out.

When you refit the pump wind the adjusting bolt down to the bottom and gradually raise it until the timing is right, and rock the flywheel back and forth to make the pump 'spit'. Don't over do it or you'll crush the pump and bugger it.

There's loads of stuff on here, on the WOK, from 38ac - Butch - and I seem to remember something from Ed Dee using the inside tube from a ball point pen or something similar. Use the site search engine.

Clean the bits with injector cleaner and a soft cloth, don't use anything abrasive, don't scratch it with a screwdriver either!

Cheers
Stef

6
Other Slow Speed Diesels / Re: Another shop project
« on: January 20, 2019, 09:30:54 AM »
Hold on there. Bob!

I suspect that there's still a lot of 'engineers' out there, someone has to make the machines that make the 'Chinese crap'!

Given a choice between working on a farm, in a foundry or down a coal mine, a career sat in a nice warm office with a keyboard and a mouse, working with technology you grew up with, don't seem too bad an option, add in the lack of mashed fingers - or worse - and then scrubbing the dirt off at the end of the shift..........

We only repaired those Mini's, Cortinta's, etc. and the rest of them 'cos we were skint, and they were somewhere near the forward edge of engineering, at the time.

In much the same way there's guys out there today that can change the battery on an IPhone 5 or whatever, on the kitchen table.

Think about the vast increase in reliability in small cars from the time of our youth. In 50 years time, when electronic equipment goes that far up the scale of dependability, there's bound to be another generation, on a forum like this, bemoaning the lack of mechanical skills in the young and their complete reliance on the domestic robot to change light bulbs and toilet rolls.

Butch making Whitworth nuts and you and Bruce buggering about with generators, mosfets and soldering irons, will be on the same plane as bodgers, blacksmiths, wheelwrights. and the other 'generalist' engineers. Glort, veg oil and solar panels won't be in it either.

Well, unless the apocalypses we suspect is coming, actually arrives, then I hope that bloke in the kitchen has downloaded this forums WOK onto his steam powered tablet! 

Rant over, I'm off up the shed to change the exhaust on the Landy, before tomorrows snow storm sets in!

Cheers
Stef

7
Other Slow Speed Diesels / Re: Another shop project
« on: January 20, 2019, 07:40:45 AM »
Looking good, Butch, thanks very much for taking the time to post all the small details and the general information too.

The ingenuity of Victorian engineers was almost beyond belief, after all, they weer the ones who did everything first.

Check this out, the first of several 'knock down kit' boats on Lake Titicaca.....

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yavari_(ship)

Cheers
Stef

8
Other Slow Speed Diesels / Re: Another shop project
« on: January 16, 2019, 07:55:18 AM »
That's a job to envy, Butch!

Cheers
Stef

9
Listeroid Engines / Re: I Need HELP; not running
« on: January 09, 2019, 07:03:13 PM »
Looks like we got the same idea and crossed posts, Glort!!

Steft

10
Listeroid Engines / Re: I Need HELP; not running
« on: January 09, 2019, 07:00:38 PM »
Has any one mentioned stuck piston rings yet? (I'm doing this on my Kindle, as I'm travelling, it means I'm worse than usual! )

The check for this is to pull off the air inlet get the piston just past TDC, with the inlet valve open and squirt a spoon full of oil on to the top of the piston. Then start cranking. If you then feel increased compression and the afford mentioned water in the inlet with the engine running and loaded up doesn't help it's time to pull the piston for a look.

Cheers
Stef

11
Engines / Re: Lister engine leaking coolant
« on: January 06, 2019, 04:59:16 PM »
Letting any engine overheat ain't a good idea!

However, if you can monitor it, every 30 minuets or so and can leave the pressure cap off, a few hours running down to the nearest yard shouldn't present a problem.

Look up on the web the systems I described and try to work out what you have, the more you know the more you can do for yourself, at the end of the day, boats of this type aren't too complicated. Note everything you do in the log- oil and water top ups, oil and filter changes, 'fan' belt sizes, it helps to build a 'picture' of the state of your craft. Carry spares for all the consumables and a small tool kit. Even if you can't use it, maybe someone else can.

Cheers
Stef

12
Listeroid Engines / Re: Video of current setup
« on: January 06, 2019, 02:49:11 PM »
It's the upside of Ade's attitude to topic management!

As Glort  (sort of) said, a few days ago, when you log on here and there's a few posts it's quite cheering, you know you're going to learn something, even if you didn't need it, couldn't use it, never wanted it and can't see the point of reading the post anyway.

I don't even mind if they are taking the piss out of me - you know who you are, Johndoh

The anally retentive that would like everything under a different topic can always skip ignore or delete the bits they feel are irrelevant........

Thanks again Ade.

Cheers
Stef

13
Engines / Re: Lister engine leaking coolant
« on: January 06, 2019, 01:48:34 PM »
Thinking further, the pump could be circulating water between the engine and a 'skin tank' a sort of radiator welded to the hull - skin - of the barge, or a keel cooler, pipes under the barges hull, to transfer the heat generated by the engine into the canal without bringing canal water in to the hull. These are good systems for small engines, as they have no risk of blockage from weeds, poly bags, etc. associated with the raw water cooling intake.

None of this will affect your problem!

Cheers
Stef

14
Engines / Re: Lister engine leaking coolant
« on: January 06, 2019, 12:45:16 PM »
Hi 'Felt' and welcome

It's not too clear from your photos, but that looks like the 'Jabsco' water circulating pump.

It's job is to circulate 'Raw' - canal - water to cool the engine, or to cool the 'Fresh' water in the engine via a heat exchanger, in the same way that air cools the radiator, that cools the water in your car. If you have a pressure cap then yours is probably the latter.

Check out this video for details of how it works

https://www.xylem.com/en-us/support/video-library/jabsco---how-does-an-impeller-pump-work/

If the leak is between the pump housing and the cylinder block then it's the rear seal, looking at the setup it'll be hard for a novice to sort it out in situ, there are service kits and spares available on the web but be aware there are umpteen different sizes and as many different drive shaft types.

The pump will leak more with the motor running, mainly due to the pressure it's creating

Best bet is to get someone in a boatyard to sort it, whilst it may seem expensive, given the longevity of the pumps and the aggravation of 'learning as you go' it'll be cheap at twice the price! Jabsco impeller pumps (and their clones) are used worldwide and are almost infinitely rebuildable.

As for the motor it's hanging off, I have no idea! With a bit more information and a few more comprehensive photos I'm sure someone on here will identify it. Which ever yard to choose to do the repair will certainly know. Once you have that information, along with pump and impeller details fan belts, filter types and makes record it in the barges log. It'll save hours later.

Same as above for the pressure cap....

Cheers
Stef

15
Listeroid Engines / Re: Video of current setup
« on: January 06, 2019, 09:13:05 AM »
I can't remember the numbers but Sikaflex literally holds the boat building industry together. Their products aren't cheap but they do what it says on the tin and are extremely durable in a salt water environment

They also do - or maybe did do - a clear liquid called Sika 5 that when mixed with pure cement causes it to harden in less than a minute. It's really useful when you have to deal with water seepage in concrete cellars or cracks in vitreous pipes.

If the pressure was more than the mix would seal we used to put a short length of pipe over the leak, connected to a suction pump, bond the pipe in place then wait five minutes, disconnect the pump, and cap it off, not a lot of use for flat belt alignment 'tho!

Cheers
Stef

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